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Thread: Complaint About Me

  1. #76
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    I paper pieced dark fabric flying geese yesterday. Followed those straight lines on the paper as if laser beamed. Then Iwhen I removed the paper to attach to border on the dark fabric. eek! My poor eyes just wouldn't do the trick and I waved all over the place. Need more light and painter's tape, and a post-it note and anything else anyone knows about. Don't think it is just you!

  2. #77
    Power Poster gabeway's Avatar
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    Reading glasses at2.5 helped me.
    Wayne & Gabriele, the married quilters.

  3. #78
    ro
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    thank you, thank you, thank you. i didnt even go any further. that is me exactly. i even draw in pencil the lines and still can't get it straight.

  4. #79
    ro
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    Quote Originally Posted by wishiwerequilting View Post
    I would like to add just a few suggestions to the advice given so far (all excellent suggestions!)
    1. Before you cut, spray starch your fabrics. I like MaryEllen's Best Press, but you may use any spray starch you like, even if you make your own solution. Just use it.
    Try to make your fabrics feel like the weight of construction paper, and then cut them. That's how stiff they should be. I know it sounds like a lot, but I learned that suggestion from Debra Wagner, who is an award winning quilter, and she is right. So much easier to cut the fabrics, and to stack them together and piece.
    2. If you feel like you need to draw a seam line (probably not necessary, but if you need "training wheels" until you get the feel of things, ok), place your fabric on a sandpaper covered mat, cardboard, whatever, and then draw lightly with a fine mechanical pencil so as not to stretch the fabrics out of shape.
    3. I have used this technique when teaching kids to sew, and some adults can benefit from it as well....
    when you are getting ready to place your fabric pieces Right Sides Together (RST), put a tiny drop of elmers school glue (or applique glue...whatever you have) in the seam allowance.
    When i say tiny, i mean tiny...like the size of a quilt pin head, or bead.
    Do it in a few places along the seam allowance of the right side of one of the fabrics. Then put your next piece of fabric on top to make your little fabric sandwich that needs to be sewn RST. Heat set the glue by pressing the fabrics with your iron. This eliminates the need for any pins.
    You can assembly line sew these pieces - just stand at your ironing mat for a bit and glue and heat set a whole bunch, then feed them into the machine and cut threads after they come out the other side of your needle - typical "chain piecing".
    You should have accurate 1/4" seams, and the pieces should be exactly one on top of the other with edges aligned.
    4. Lastly, it's my opinion...(i'm not a machine tech, so i could be wrong, but i swear this is the case) that some machines "kick" the fabrics out of alignment. It's as if the feed dogs are mis-aligned. I can sew on some of my students machines and i can't sew straight either, then sit down at my machine and i am fine. sometimes it is not the sewer but the machine. if all else fails, get yours checked out, and/or try sewing on some other machines to see if there is a difference.
    Hope this helps. Love all the suggestions here!!
    i loved suggestion #3 to use the glue. i follow the needle, put lines on the seam allowance; however, sometimes the bottom fabric isnt exactly next to the top layer. but the tiny dot of glue should do it. thank you for that suggestion

  5. #80
    ro
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    why don't you bring it back to where you bought it. or to a certified brother dealer. they should be able to look at it and tell you what's wrong with it.

  6. #81
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I took a precision piecing class and the most important thing I learned was to sew S L O W. Very S L O W. We started with counting the stitches 1 stitch 2 stitch 3 stitch......while sewing. I was amazed how much better my piecing was by sewing that slow.
    Got fabric?

  7. #82
    Junior Member quiltnchik's Avatar
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    It took me a while to learn and get in the habit, but always look at your destination and NOT at your needle. Try it - it works!

  8. #83
    Senior Member madamepurl's Avatar
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    I do the same thing. Have to unpick ends on occasion. I'm still working on training myself to not watch the needle to watch the line. Ugh!
    - Rose

  9. #84
    Senior Member madamepurl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    I took a precision piecing class and the most important thing I learned was to sew S L O W. Very S L O W. We started with counting the stitches 1 stitch 2 stitch 3 stitch......while sewing. I was amazed how much better my piecing was by sewing that slow.

    Very interesting. I'm going to try it! Great tip!
    - Rose

  10. #85
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Another tip I learned from a dress maker who worked for several fashion designers was to lay your finger against the left edge of your foot when coming to the end of the seam. The seam will not veer at all. It's a habit now and I forget I'm doing it. Another tip she gave me was always hold the top piece of a long seam up off the bottom fabric, the two fabric only going together under the foot. The two fabrics is cut the same size will always sew exactly the same length.
    Got fabric?

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