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Cutting on point

Cutting on point

Old 08-31-2012, 05:54 AM
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Question Cutting on point

I just bought "501 Rotary-Cut Quilt Blocks" by Judy Hopkins. The instructions for many of the blocks call for making a template and having squares or rectangles cut on point resulting in shapes cut on the bias. Is there any reason I couldn't cut these on the straight grain? Sub-cutting a long strip seems much easier than cutting squares or rectangles from a template. Does the bias cut square make the block more stable?
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Old 08-31-2012, 06:02 AM
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I prefer to cut strips
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Old 08-31-2012, 09:51 AM
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I think the block is more stable if all your grain lines go the same way. So a square might be cut on bias, and then set into a square-in-a-square setting - with the resulting outer edges on straight grain and the straight grain of the block you cut on bias then running straight across the square. Does that make any sense? It is the only reason I can come up with for cutting something on bias - to end up with the block on-grain.
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Old 08-31-2012, 11:32 AM
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Originally Posted by kristakz View Post
I think the block is more stable if all your grain lines go the same way. So a square might be cut on bias, and then set into a square-in-a-square setting - with the resulting outer edges on straight grain and the straight grain of the block you cut on bias then running straight across the square. Does that make any sense? It is the only reason I can come up with for cutting something on bias - to end up with the block on-grain.
After reading your response, I studied the diagrams in the book and it makes perfect sense! Cutting the squares and rectangles on point makes all of the grainlines in the block run in the same direction.
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Old 08-31-2012, 01:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Elaray View Post
I just bought "501 Rotary-Cut Quilt Blocks" by Judy Hopkins. The instructions for many of the blocks call for making a template and having squares or rectangles cut on point resulting in shapes cut on the bias. Is there any reason I couldn't cut these on the straight grain? Sub-cutting a long strip seems much easier than cutting squares or rectangles from a template. Does the bias cut square make the block more stable?
Do the instructions tell you to cut on the bias or are you just assuming the pieces are bias since they are set on point? Anything I've ever done SET on point, has been cut square.
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Old 08-31-2012, 06:42 PM
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I agree with GrannieAnnie -- most of the patterns I have seen have the squares cut on the straight of grain and just set on point.
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Old 09-01-2012, 02:24 PM
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Originally Posted by GrannieAnnie View Post
Do the instructions tell you to cut on the bias or are you just assuming the pieces are bias since they are set on point? Anything I've ever done SET on point, has been cut square.
The instructions actually say cut on the bias. The templates have a grain line that definitely indicates a bias cut square or rectangle.
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Old 09-02-2012, 10:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Elaray View Post
The instructions actually say cut on the bias. The templates have a grain line that definitely indicates a bias cut square or rectangle.
I've had pieces that were cut on the diagonal and I've placed blue painter's tape close to the stitching line to keep the bias from stretching. OUtside of that, I avoid bias cuts like the plague.
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Old 09-02-2012, 11:24 AM
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If you are going to use the bias, do yourself a big favor and starch the dickins out of the fabric to stablize it or you could have a nightmare on your hands.
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Old 09-02-2012, 11:59 AM
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Just to chime in - if you want the straight grain on the edges............... Add 1 1/4" to the long side of the triangle. Cut a square that size and cut on both diagonals. Four triangles result. Ta da!!!!
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