Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 60

Thread: Do you double stitch your seams

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    315

    Do you double stitch your seams

    When you piece your quilts, do you double stitch your seams?
    (On some quilts I have bought seams will come open and fray making
    it hard to patch some quilts, so frequently I double stitch on my piecing of
    my quilts.) Just wondering how many of you do that, or am I just wasting my time double stitching.
    And do you backstitch at the beginning and ends of your pieces?
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Super Member DOTTYMO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    England Alton Towers
    Posts
    6,641
    Blog Entries
    1
    I do. On long pieces I always do but I must admit if I chain piece I tend to forget. With this new machine it has a fix button few stitches in one place and I use it far more. Like yourself I have found seams coming undone . I do like paper piecing and I hand stitch and always double stitch when working by hand. I think I must follow the same practise.
    Will be interesting hearing from the very experienced quilters.
    Finished is better than a UFO

  3. #3
    Super Member petthefabric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Eastern Madera County, Ca
    Posts
    1,038
    The short answer-no. I do use a shorter than normal stitch length. I've not had any problems. My king size quilts have been to the cleaners several times. At first, they didn't want to take them. I signed something about them coming apart at the seams, they weren't responsible. After the first time, they've never hesitated again. Mine do not come apart. I've heard of problems with store bought quilts coming apart. Could be lots of reasons: thread count, raveling fabric, poor seam width consistency, Top stretched when quilting putting undue stress on the seams. Quilting helps stablize seams and most storebought are so loosely quilted, they probably don't help the integrity of the seams.

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Far NW
    Posts
    209
    I don't unless there is an urgent reason. Generally speaking the more stuff (thread) you try to stuff into a small area (your block piece) the more trouble you are going to have controlling it and the stiffer the fabric (the quilt) will end up. ( I used to be a hand weaver, too.)

    I sew everything on the machine, and I use about 10-12 sts /in. If the stitch line is going to be intersected by another line I don't back tack. And this is talking about good quality quilting cotton, too.

    In 30 years I've never had any horror stories.

    I do have a friend I have to re stock with quilts about every 5 years, but they have a big family with dogs and cats and the quilts get loved hard and dragged around the house and washed in the washer every week. I have the fabrics for her next 2 quilts picked out and ready to go as soon as I get my niece's wedding quilt done (which has had the pattern and colors chosen, but not bought till the start of the month) and the wedding was last weekend. HA! Not slow here.

  5. #5
    Super Member SherriB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Quilting somewhere......
    Posts
    2,846
    Blog Entries
    40
    I don't double sew my seams nor do I back-stitch. I was sewer before I started quilting and it took me a bit to stop back-stitching every seam. I have made several quilts for my grandchildren that are washed weekly and no seams have come undone yet. I try to use good quality fabric and threads.
    Sherri

  6. #6
    Super Member 117becca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    dayton OH
    Posts
    1,878
    I don't either. I hand quilt my quilts, and I get an additional up close looksie. I have been known to fix a rare seem and use some fray check to keep it in place.
    my name is becca and i'm a quilt-a-holic :-)

  7. #7
    Super Member hopetoquilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    2,873
    No... It woul take forever to finish a quilt. I use good fabrics and threads and have not had a problem. My sons daycare quilt was washed ever week for 2 years and held strong the entire time.

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Central NJ
    Posts
    4,621
    I do not. Most all seams in the quilt intersect. Those that don't - and if I remember - I, too, have a 'fix' button on my machine which is a computerized version of back-tacking.

  9. #9
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    11,194
    Blog Entries
    1
    the only time i double stitch seams is for flannel raggy quilts. i do either backstitch or take a couple tiny (in place-locking stitches) at the beginning of seams that are not crossed over (so locked during constuction). I do (stay stitch) a line of stitching all the way around a finished quilt top to keep the edges secure so no seams are pulling apart along the outer edge when quilting
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  10. #10
    Super Member NikkiLu's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    So. Central MO
    Posts
    2,640
    Blog Entries
    1
    I don't but was gifted my BFF's fabric, etc. after she passed away and she had some unfinished blocks - two different fabrics sewed together in two's - I did not like the two together so decided to take them apart and had the most difficult time picking out the seams as she had sewn them together with two lines of stitching. They were juvenile prints so maybe she double stitched them because a child would be getting the quilt.
    Nikki in MO

  11. #11
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Cadillac, MI
    Posts
    6,582
    Blog Entries
    19
    No to both. If your tensions are well balanced, the seam is 1/4" (no slippage underneath) and the stitches are 10-12 to an inch, that seam will hold unless the fabric is too coarse, but most people don't quilt with loosely woven fabric.

    I worry when I see a quilt pictured that has the tension off so the thread shows from the right side.

  12. #12
    Super Member Tink's Mom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    chicago, IL
    Posts
    9,692
    No, no double stitching...
    I recently found one of my first quilts and nothing is wrong with it...suprisingly. I made it for my younger son before he was born, 29 years ago....and it was washed weekly for about 4 years.
    This was before I knew what I was doing...so no free motion quilting.
    Tink's Mom (My name is really Susie)

  13. #13
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    central Indiana
    Posts
    1,164
    No. Never. I do, however, reduce my stitch length to 2.

  14. #14
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Monroe, IN
    Posts
    2,285
    I do not sew a double stitch line, nor do I backstitch. If the pieces are smaller or being cut down to smaller pieces, I will use a smaller than normal stitch. Otherwise, all of the stitch line ends will be stitched over and secured when I put the blocks together. Once finished blocks are together and top done, I stay-stitch around the outside edge so I don't pull any seams loose while quilting. My quilting is dense enough (but never dense enough to make the quilt stiff) to secure the seams as well. I have made quite a few utility quilts for the house and those get washed often. I have never had a seam pull loose.

  15. #15
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outer Space
    Posts
    9,839
    Double stitching would only lead to bulk in the seams. Like all the above posters who chain stitch, and lower the stitch count...that takes care of any possible issues.

  16. #16
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,661
    Blog Entries
    2
    If I use a small stitch length when I piece and if I have to rip out a seam it's a pain and time consuming. I like to backstitch at the start and end of each seam using a #2 stitch length. The only time I double seam is when I have a wobble in my seam and I have to make it straight.
    Got fabric?

  17. #17
    Super Member pumpkinpatchquilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    1,374
    Nope never. Only if I have a weak spot or an area of fraying - but I am pretty meticulous about removing areas or restitching so that those types of situations don't occur. I do back stitch on borders and I often use smaller stitches if I know I'm going to long arm quilt the top.
    Valerie Smith - pumpkinpatchquilter
    Obsessed Quilter and APQS Long Arm Machine Quilter
    www.pumpkinpatchquilter.com

  18. #18
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    The Colony, TX
    Posts
    3,364
    I don't do either. Like a lot of the posters above I do shorten my stitch length. Newer machines come preset with a larger stitch length than they used to. I.E.: The new (last 10-15 years) Berninas come with a preset stitch length of 2.5, I dial that back to a 2. I remember on my older Bernina (can't remember the model) 2 was the standard. I think that we forget sometimes that sewing machines are not built/set up for quilters, they are set up for sewers (garment/home dec). Try lowering your stich length and testing your tension (upper and lower) until you get a good stitch - just play for a little bit. If you take 2 pieces of fabric sew a line down them and then open it up you should be able to give them a tug without seeing any thread in the seam. Superior Threads I believe has some good info on tension on their website. Sorry I don't know how to explain it.

  19. #19
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    The Colony, TX
    Posts
    3,364
    Forgot to mention, I have a quilt on my bed that I made about 15 years ago (yes it is tiime for a new one). We used to have a dog who would get on the bed a lot so it was washed once a week for many years. Now not as often but the only real wear on it is on the binding and that is mainly because my husband like to tuck it under the mattress and I like to pull on it.

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    315
    Hi Ladies,
    Thank you for all your answers. Looks like I may just be wasting time double stitching.
    Pumpkinpatchquilter, why do you need to make a smaller stitch if it goes to the long arm?
    I send my out to a longarmquilter to machine quilt. Do you machine sew them on stitch length of 2?
    Thanks.

  21. #21
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Upland CA
    Posts
    18,361
    No i never have.

  22. #22
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Small town in Northeast Oregon close to Washington and Idaho
    Posts
    2,733
    Blog Entries
    5
    I don't double stitch or lower my stitch length and I've made well over 50 quilts and not one has come apart. I don't back tack even though my Bernina comes with that option. I override it.
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
    Strong people don't put others down...they build them up."
    "Remember that your instincts are more important than rules"

  23. #23
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    9,385
    I don't double stitch. I think one of the reasons store purchased quilts "come apart" is that many of the quilts made in China have so little seam allowance. Many many years ago I was given a "store/China" quilt as a gift. All it took was one wash and about 10 percent of the seams opened up , and not just a little.

  24. #24
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    1,257
    No. Using good quality fabric and a normal stitch length it is not necessary to double stitch seams.

  25. #25
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    11,926
    Blog Entries
    1
    I think double stitching is a waste of time. Shortening your stitch slightly would be much more efficient.

    Also, don't cut your threads too close to the edge; I always leave at least half an inch of thread hanging, sometimes more. (I have an older machine that does not have an auto cut feature. Not sure how close auto cuts would be.)

    Edit: Also, check the balance of tensions for your stitch. Some older machines never achieve a good, even balance and that may be part of your problem. If upper and lower tensions are unbalanced (or if both are too loose), stitches will unravel much more easily. Still, shortening the stitch length should compensate even for that problem and save you a lot of time.
    Last edited by Prism99; 03-20-2013 at 09:20 AM.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.