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Thread: Does anyone else? - straight line quilting

  1. #1
    Super Member notmorecraft's Avatar
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    Does anyone else? - straight line quilting

    Is it just me? Or does anyone else find straight line quilting a design take longer than fmq on a dsm? Im currently straight line sewing a design and Ive definitely spent more time doing this than I do fmq, this is the second quilt I've felt this happen with. Don't get me wrong I'm enjoying and it will be nice when finished, this is just an observation. Happy 2015 everyone.

  2. #2
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
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    It's harder to keep the line straight when doing FMQ, plus using the feed dogs with the walking foot probably pulls the fabric along faster.

  3. #3
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    A nice wandering kind of pattern is so much quicker mostly because it doesn't require all that marking. Last night I tried using some painters tape to mark my straight lines. Why didn't I try that earlier? It was quicker, it doesn't brush off while I'm working and I can see it easily.

  4. #4
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    it's hard to say - definitely - one way or the other.
    i think it would depend a lot on how often a quilter used each method compared to the other.
    i'm not at all fast using either method.
    my results are not spectacular either way, either. LOL

    i can usually get one done in less time doing a basic cross-hatch than i can doing FMQ.
    i use a "domestic" machine, though.
    if i had a long-arm rig i assume that [after lots of practice] FMQ would go much faster than straight lines & curves on the regular machine.

    anybody want to donate $30 - 50k so i can test my theory? LOL
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  5. #5
    Super Member bjchad's Avatar
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    I think you turn the quilt more often in strait line quilting than in FMQ which would add to the time it takes.

  6. #6
    Super Member sewmom's Avatar
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    I find a basic stipple or meander is quicker than grid work or SITD.
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  7. #7
    Power Poster ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
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    I have always preferred the look of hand quilting when I machine quilt my quilts. If I am doing a straight line, I always use my walking foot. Last year I was lucky to buy a brand new older version of a Bernina walking foot. I think it is important to quilt a quilt the way to give depth and perspective to the piecing of the quilt.
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  8. #8
    Super Member franc36's Avatar
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    I use my walking foot for as much straight line quilting as I can do comfortably; but I find that I end up doing up at least half or more straight line quilting with my BSR. That is slower, for me, as I want to be sure my stitching is straight. I am not yet to the point that I can FMQ a straight line rapidly.

  9. #9
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    The quilts I've worked on have been straight line on the diagonal. I used the painters blue tape with the light adhesive. Anytime I see it at the home improvement stores, I pick up a couple roles. I have also done cross hatch. Small child's crib size quilt.

  10. #10
    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
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    I have only don straight line quilting. I have don a small amount of meandering but I am not good at it YET. If and when I can stipple good I will probably say it is less time consuming.
    Suzanne
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  11. #11
    Super Member quiltedsunshine's Avatar
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    Yea, it might take longer. But sometimes, it's just what the quilt needs.

    Happy 2015!
    Annette in Utah

  12. #12
    Super Member soccertxi's Avatar
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    straight lines on a long arm are a bear...DIAGONAL straight lines on a long arm make me crosseyed and give me a headache!! Love FM...SID not so much

  13. #13
    Super Member faykilgore's Avatar
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    I've tried to do straight line quilting free motion, but it looks like I'm either drunk or have severe palsy. It is slower using the walking foot and a huge pain to wrestle large quilts under the small throats of DSM's, but for SID and straight lines, I have to accept the tradeoff.
    Fay

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  14. #14
    Super Member DOTTYMO's Avatar
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    I find I can straight line on a domestic machine very quickly. I'm afraid I personally dislike an all over pattern which doesn't have any respect for the patchwork.
    straight lines using the walking foot and moving needle makes varied stripes on a quilt.
    Finished is better than a UFO

  15. #15
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DOTTYMO View Post

    I find I can straight line on a domestic machine very quickly. I'm afraid I personally dislike an all over pattern which doesn't have any respect for the patchwork.
    straight lines using the walking foot and moving needle makes varied stripes on a quilt.
    I so agree with you!!! Love quilting that emphasizes the piecework and all the time that took.
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  16. #16
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    I just wish I could master fmq, lol

  17. #17
    Super Member wendiq's Avatar
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    That blue painter's tape is a Godsend! I have 1" and 2". Love using it and it can be used over and over on the same quilt.

  18. #18
    Senior Member leighway's Avatar
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    SLQ is easy for me because the Bernina walking foot has a guide right down the center front. I just follow the seam or whatever mark I"ve made.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ManiacQuilter2 View Post
    I have always preferred the look of hand quilting when I machine quilt my quilts. If I am doing a straight line, I always use my walking foot. Last year I was lucky to buy a brand new older version of a Bernina walking foot. I think it is important to quilt a quilt the way to give depth and perspective to the piecing of the quilt.
    I'm so glad you mentioned this. I do love the look also but have forgotten about the hand quilting look feature. I've never tried this but I so want to now! I will have to figure out how to do it I guess.

    I do sometimes quilt SiTD with a walking foot or use the little bar to line up the walking foot next to a seam or previously quilted line, and yes it seems to go slower but I try to let the quilt determine how it should be quilted. I also like to quilt simple designs with gentle curves with my walking foot. But I agree, the FMQ seems to go faster most of the time.

  20. #20
    Super Member JudyTheSewer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sewmom View Post
    I find a basic stipple or meander is quicker than grid work or SITD.
    Yes, me too.

  21. #21
    Super Member applique's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wendiq View Post
    That blue painter's tape is a Godsend! I have 1" and 2". Love using it and it can be used over and over on the same quilt.
    Some of the 'frog' brand painter's tape has curved and other edges that can be used for mor variety.
    Debbie
    Machine It

  22. #22
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    I think straight line takes much more time. I know when I have tried it, I have to completely turn the quilt aound several times and I seem to quilt closer together. A fmq meander is quick and easy once you get the hang of it.

  23. #23
    Super Member Ariannaquilts's Avatar
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    Doesn't anyone use the straight line guide that you attach to the walking foot? I have used this to make sure that my lines are straight no chance of tape residue on my quilts. Besides it allows me to determine the width between the lines.
    Maria
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  24. #24
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    I can cross hatch a quilt in no time. I bought the Stanley six foot and four foot straight edge from Lowe's. They are exactly 2 1/2'' wide. I can mark the lines easy and straight using those. I start in the middle of the quilt and stitch out, flip and start in the middle out again. Turn the quilt and do it the opposite way. It's a little boring but it's easy and looks great for the majority of my pieced quilts.

    Oh forgot to say it's very important to start marking from the middle, corner to corner then mark out to the edge. I mark diagonal.
    Last edited by Onebyone; 01-11-2015 at 11:10 AM.
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  25. #25
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    I like to do curving designs achieved with templates on borders and sashes where it is effective. generally, do SID or straight lines to do my machine quilting on my domestic machine. Love, love, love the Frixon marking pens.

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