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Does Machine Applique Fray?

Does Machine Applique Fray?

Old 01-03-2009, 11:40 AM
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This New Year's Day quilt is turning into a real project! I now have all these quarter-circle curves that should have tape on the edges but I'm thinking I might machine applique the edges down. I have never machine appliqued before, and tried one edge to see how it will look. My question is - will the edges fray out from under the stitching? Does this mean the quilt is not washable?

Here's a picture of what it looks like. I don't have a micro setting on my camera, so it's hard to get close-ups, but hopefully you can see the threads coming out from under the stitching. Help, please.
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Old 01-03-2009, 12:47 PM
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I sure hope not, because I did a bunch of quilts this way!

I used steam a seam tho and them appliqued it.
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Old 01-03-2009, 01:00 PM
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Steam a seam says it will not fray when washed but I haven't tested it.
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Old 01-03-2009, 02:08 PM
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Barbara,

If you are going to machine applique you either have to use a satin stitch which is a zig zag very close together or stabilize the edge somehow. You could iron the raw edges under before you stitch or if you use fuseable. Fuse a bigger piece of fabric than you need and then cut it down to the right size. That way the glue will go all the way to the edge. Raw edge applique is usually only used for wallhangings or things that you want to fray.
I save used dryer sheets and make my appliques have turned edges by stitching the fabric right side together with the dryer sheet. By sewing the two together on what was the cutting line I now have the perfect shapped applique. Then I can cut a slit in the dryer sheet and turn the applique to the right side. The dryer sheet is thin enough to not add much bulk and it keeps the raw edges turned under. I can then stitch the appliques to the quilt by any method. Hand or machine.
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Old 01-03-2009, 04:21 PM
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There is a product called Fray-chek in the same section as sewing notions or basting spray. It comes in a squeeze botttle with a dropper tip that allows you to trace the edges in the fluid. I've used it for years on all types of fabrics and it's never let me down.
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Old 01-03-2009, 04:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Moonpi
There is a product called Fray-chek in the same section as sewing notions or basting spray. It comes in a squeeze botttle with a dropper tip that allows you to trace the edges in the fluid. I've used it for years on all types of fabrics and it's never let me down.
This is a great product and I've used it on patched holes in my jeans. I'll have to say that as often as jeans are washed, I had to reapply every few months though.
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Old 01-03-2009, 09:50 PM
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This has all helped. Thanks so much.
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Old 01-03-2009, 10:46 PM
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Fray-Check is great stuff!!!
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Old 01-06-2009, 08:00 AM
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That is the way my mom did all her applique on quilts. Even on the baby quilts that were washed frequently the seams did not fray.
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:11 PM
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I like to use buttonhole stitch for machine applique;At first glance, it almost looks hand sewn. Not all machines have a buttonhole stitch, though. If I am going to fuse my pieces down, I use the Ultra Bond Light or Steam a Seam Light fusible webs (both can be purchased at JoAnn's). Be careful not to purchase the ultra/heavy weight products for bonding, as they are difficult to sew through and will result in stiff appliques. I find it is easiest to use Titanium coated needles, since they are less likely to gum up with the fusible web. If you choose to sew your appliques and then to turn them inside out, use Quilt Smart for your interfacing. It is very thin & delicate like the dryer sheets suggested, but can be purchased off the bolt and therefore you are not limited to the size of a dryer sheet. Hope this helps. Nita
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