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Thread: Does this method of preparing binding help avoid puckers???

  1. #1
    Super Member copycat's Avatar
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    Question Does this method of preparing binding help avoid puckers???

    I read in the tutorial on the web address listed below, that after you fold your binding strip in half, that you can zig-zag the raw edges together before attaching the binding to the quilt. By doing this method, you avoid puckers and pleats in your binding . Has anyone tried this method? copycat

    http://www.redpepperquilts.com/2009/...-tutorial.html

  2. #2
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    I don't find that I have puckers in the binding I fold it, iron it carefully and hold it in place while attaching. If you make sure both layers are flat, this doesn't happen. I also put the binding on with the binding foot. This probably helps. for me to zig zag is just another unnecessary step

  3. #3
    Super Member snipforfun's Avatar
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    I starch my binding strips then fold them in half and press dry. Starch pretty much "glues" them together so they dont separate. This is on Sharon Schambers youtube about her gluing method of binding which is all I use.

  4. #4
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
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    attaching the binding to the quilt with a walking foot keeps my binding pucker free.
    I have chosen to be happy because it is good for my health - Voltaire

  5. #5
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    I simply fold and press the binding in half. I've never had a problem with puckers.
    Nancy in western NY
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    Super Member mimom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Holice View Post
    I don't find that I have puckers in the binding I fold it, iron it carefully and hold it in place while attaching. If you make sure both layers are flat, this doesn't happen. I also put the binding on with the binding foot. This probably helps. for me to zig zag is just another unnecessary step
    same here, I never have a problem

  7. #7
    Super Member Quiltngolfer's Avatar
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    Just be sure to use the walking foot and you won't have puckers.

  8. #8
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    I've never had a problem with a binding unless doing curves or scallops with bias binding. I do bias binding a little more carefully but never had any puckers with it. I use straight of the grain binding on all straight edge quilts with no problems. If the zig zag edge helps you, then go for it.


  9. #9
    Super Member grammy Dwynn's Avatar
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    IMHO I think it is just a extra step (zig-zag) that I would not care to do. Possibly it would keep one from stretching the fabric to much.

    I put my binding on with my walking foot, after I fold and press.

    Since the walking foot does not have marks/guides, I have worked out a method, for me, to get the seam allowance that I want by moving my needle and using the edge of the foot.

    One method that works for one person may not work for another. Find one that you like and go for it.
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  10. #10
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
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    I usually do a serpentine stitch instead of zigzag around the edge when I am done quilting. I've done them without and prefer it with, so that's what I generally do. I also starch my binding strips as I am pressing in half and attach with the walking foot. I never have puckers. Try a couple of ways and do what works best for you.

  11. #11
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I zig zag around the whole quilt edge before sewing on the binding. An overlock stitch works too. This step really helps to have great looking binding. I use the Simplicity binding machine to make non bias folded binding. It's always perfectly straight.
    Got fabric?

  12. #12
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
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    IMHO....if you are getting puckers perhaps you are not holding the binding even, pulling on side more than the other....perhaps pinning more would help.

  13. #13
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I have never had a need to zigzag the binding edges together. My binding never puckers. However, I do starch the binding fabric heavily before cutting into strips -- whether doing straight grain binding or bias binding. Bias binding will definitely have more of a tendency to pucker (from stretching while you are handling it), so it is especially important to starch that yardage before cutting. My starching method is to mix a 1:1 solution fo Sta-Flo liquid laundry starch and water, "paint" this onto the yardage until the fabric is saturated, toss in dryer, then iron with steam. This results in a very heavy starch that stabilizes the fabric so it does not stretch while sewing. (I do the same for quilt backings to prevent puckers while machine quilting.)

  14. #14
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Try seveal ways on sample sandwiches, making sure to include a corner on each, so you can find what works best for you. I've never had puckers or stretching in a binding or anything else, bias or straight of grain, and I haven't had any starch in the house since maybe 1982. Find what works for you and stick with it until something works better.
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  15. #15
    Super Member SewExtremeSeams's Avatar
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    Several years ago I ran across this Connecting Threads tutorial on Crossgrain Binding. Crossgrain, meaning you cut straight strips on the width of the fabric.

    http://www.connectingthreads.com/tut...ideo__D43.html

    I have been using this method without a walking foot, zigzagging or starching. The only place I pin is when I have stitched down to a corner and then, I pin it to hold the fold while I reposition the needle. It works for me. I try not to pull/stretch the loose binding as I am sewing down the edge. Guess I should add that I try to carefully fold the binding fabric (almost always 2.5") when I am pressing it in half. Like others have said, practice on small samples (like mug rugs or potholders) until you find a method that works for you, then... perfect it. Happy Quilting.

    Forgot to mention, I sew my binding on one side, turn it by pressing and then hand stitch the back side. I admire those who can sew both sides and come out with straight stitching... my bindings don't look as good if I stitch the second side. Just a quirk for this quilter, I guess!
    Last edited by SewExtremeSeams; 07-14-2012 at 12:24 PM.

    Linda

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    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I zig zag the quilt edges because it makes it easier for me to get a perfectly straight binding when turning to one side. I don't like bumpy or flat binding. It has to be full, rounded, and even all the way around.
    Got fabric?

  17. #17
    Super Member SewExtremeSeams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    I zig zag the quilt edges because it makes it easier for me to get a perfectly straight binding when turning to one side. I don't like bumpy or flat binding. It has to be full, rounded, and even all the way around.

    Bella, I am not sure what you mean by flat binding?

    Linda

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  18. #18
    Super Member franc36's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DebraK View Post
    attaching the binding to the quilt with a walking foot keeps my binding pucker free.
    That's what I do and I have never had a puckered binding. I just fold and press the binding in half. Someone here once suggested putting the pressed binding on a roller, putting a cord through the roller and tying it to wear around your neck to attach the binding. That has been a real time saver for me because my binding was always getting twisted as I sewed it on. With it on the roll around my neck, I never have a twist in the binding. My roller is made of very heavy cardboard and is about the size of the one that comes in toilet paper. I use a ribbon to tie it around my neck.

  19. #19
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    No puckers here - I just sew it down without pins, though I may pull on the binding a bit to keep it smooth. I do ZZ the edges of the quilt so nothing escapes on the bottom. For bias binding, I definitely would not want to ZZ it. Extra thread would cut down on the flexibility needed for odd shapes.

  20. #20
    Power Poster ube quilting's Avatar
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    I never even iron my binding in half any more before applying it to the quilt and I learned this "non- doing trick" right here and it works great for me. Not bragging but very rarely have trouble.

    The idea that was posted on the QB explained that by not ironing the binding in half and just folding the edges together as you sew it to the quilt actually makes it easier to then fold over to the back without having to fight with the pleat made by ironing. The binding just rolls right over the edge of the quilt for hand sewing. It sure saves time and is very easy this way.

    I think the idea of zig-zagging the binding is a great idea for everyone with concerns about their binding and can help build confidence. I love to do binding. I always have and I like it even more now.
    peace

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by snipforfun View Post
    I starch my binding strips then fold them in half and press dry. Starch pretty much "glues" them together so they dont separate. This is on Sharon Schambers youtube about her gluing method of binding which is all I use.

    I also tried her method and found I had good results. I used an empty hair spray bottle and created heavy StaFlo starch mixture to spray on the inside of the binding. It's surprising how well it sticks together. I always use a walking foot.
    Cheryl Robinson
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  22. #22
    Senior Member happyquiltmom's Avatar
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    I used to get puckers all the time until I discovered the walking foot! No problems now.

  23. #23
    Super Member burchquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Holice View Post
    I don't find that I have puckers in the binding I fold it, iron it carefully and hold it in place while attaching. If you make sure both layers are flat, this doesn't happen. I also put the binding on with the binding foot. This probably helps. for me to zig zag is just another unnecessary step
    I don't have any problems with mine either & I don't use a binding foot. I just use my regular old foot. I do make sure the binding is really ironed well, tho. And I take my time.
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  24. #24
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    I put everything on with as little pinning and stitching as I can.I think you will find more puckers if something is stitched and therefore not flexible enough to move where you want it to.

  25. #25
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    Since I started using a walking foot, putting binding on has been a breeze!

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