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Thread: Does this method of preparing binding help avoid puckers???

  1. #26
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    I have tried that method ONE TIME...IMHO sewing those ends together reduced the "give" necessary on binding and actually created puckers. If you have problems with pucker I'm wondering if bias binding would work better for you than straight of grain binding as bias has even more give to it.

  2. #27
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    I fold and press my binding, and stitch it on with a walking foot. I always machine baste the first 4 or 5 inches so I can do a "trial" fold to the back to make sure the binding JUST covers the stitching line. Then, it's just stitching the rest down. I do put a little tension on the binding when I'm sewing it. I never pin...even the corners! Never had a problem with puckers or pleats!
    psumom

  3. #28
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    I don't get puckers in my binding. I also don't press binding in half before attaching had lecture with Marci Baker and she just folds binding in half and sews it to quilt save a step. So I tried it and I like it and when turn to wrong side to hand stitch down it lays great so i save a save time...

  4. #29
    Super Member Latrinka's Avatar
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    I just press mine in half, and sew it on. I don't starch it, I probly would if it was thin or flimsy material. Never had problem with puckering. The only time I had problem with puckering was when I used to use bought binding. Now I always make my own.
    If a woman's work is never done....why start?

  5. #30
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
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    I just wrote a thread asking if anyone else did this? I always sew 1/8" in on the edge of my binding before I sew it onto my quilts. It helps it so it doesn't pull apart. I have a bit of trouble with it moving when I am sewing it on. When I sew the binding together, it makes all the difference to me IMO.
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
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  6. #31
    Senior Member rrhaigh's Avatar
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    I am going to try this. Sounds like a good idea. I don't seem to have problems with binding, but this seems like it would ensure no problems. Thanks for sharing!

    Quote Originally Posted by snipforfun View Post
    I starch my binding strips then fold them in half and press dry. Starch pretty much "glues" them together so they dont separate. This is on Sharon Schambers youtube about her gluing method of binding which is all I use.
    Robin
    robinsquiltingroom.blogspot.com
    Southern California

  7. #32
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    Thanks so much!!!! Never thought of zigzagging --would be a great help for me!!!
    "Love and kindness are never wasted. They always make a difference. They bless the one who receives them, and they bless you, the giver." Barbara De Angelis

  8. #33
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    I never have zig zagged nor do I ever starch and my bindings seem to be okay. I use the rest of her method though for joining strips and finishing the ends.

  9. #34
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    i only press my binding before applying. zig-zaging the raw edges seems to be an extra step, in addition adds another layer of thread in the binding.

  10. #35
    Senior Member mustangquilts's Avatar
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    I use my walking foot to put the binding on and I never get pleats or folds. Works perfect everytime.

  11. #36
    Senior Member captlynhall's Avatar
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    I haven't had a problem with puckering either. Don't own a walking foot, but may get one for future use. I fold and press, then sew slowly to ensure everything lines up as I go. I have only bound straight sides, but I do use the cross grain as it has a bit of give.
    When a dying man asked his pastor "How long does it take to die?" his pastor's heartfelt reply was "A lifetime." Live life to the fullest, but stop now and then to enjoy the sunset.
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  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by SewExtremeSeams View Post
    Several years ago I ran across this Connecting Threads tutorial on Crossgrain Binding. Crossgrain, meaning you cut straight strips on the width of the fabric.

    http://www.connectingthreads.com/tut...ideo__D43.html

    I have been using this method without a walking foot, zigzagging or starching. The only place I pin is when I have stitched down to a corner and then, I pin it to hold the fold while I reposition the needle. It works for me. I try not to pull/stretch the loose binding as I am sewing down the edge. Guess I should add that I try to carefully fold the binding fabric (almost always 2.5") when I am pressing it in half. Like others have said, practice on small samples (like mug rugs or potholders) until you find a method that works for you, then... perfect it. Happy Quilting.

    Forgot to mention, I sew my binding on one side, turn it by pressing and then hand stitch the back side. I admire those who can sew both sides and come out with straight stitching... my bindings don't look as good if I stitch the second side. Just a quirk for this quilter, I guess!
    I love this tutorial! I am a new quilter and have not had a problem with puckering but m going to try this method. Also, I like the idea of not pressing and not fighting with the pressed crease. Thanks for all of the great help!

  13. #38
    Super Member QandE2010's Avatar
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    I say, try several different methods and go with the one that works for you. I use the Sharon Schambers method with glue.
    Alma
    Nami to 6

  14. #39
    Super Member 1screech's Avatar
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    zig zagging quilt for binding

    I think that this is refering to serge the quilt. I do run a stitch around my quilt before adding the binding because it helps hold everything together and keeps puckers and pleats out of the quilt while putting the binding on the quilt.

    Quote Originally Posted by copycat View Post
    I read in the tutorial on the web address listed below, that after you fold your binding strip in half, that you can zig-zag the raw edges together before attaching the binding to the quilt. By doing this method, you avoid puckers and pleats in your binding . Has anyone tried this method? copycat

    http://www.redpepperquilts.com/2009/...-tutorial.html

  15. #40
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    thank you for all the great ideas everyone brought up

  16. #41
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    Do you use the straight grain or bias? I usually use the straight grain and don't get puckers. I don't find a need to use bias unless I round the corners or make a scallopped edge.

  17. #42
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    I use a walking foot or the starch and press method.

  18. #43
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    I will try putting the pressed binding on a roller as you described. Thanks for passing on this tip. Now< I better get on a ROLL and get this binding on a roll. HA! copycat

  19. #44
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    I love that roller idea! I sewed a binding on last week and it kept falling onto the floor.

  20. #45
    Super Member Latrinka's Avatar
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    As with everything, do what works for you.
    If a woman's work is never done....why start?

  21. #46
    Senior Member MarthaT's Avatar
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    No one has mentioned that when zigzagging around the edges you compress the edge of the quilt so that you don't have a "full" binding. I like my finished edge with binding to be as thick as the quilt. I do hand baste around the raw edges to keep the edges together when sewing on the binding, but I like the raw edges of the quilt to fluff back up to fill up my binding.
    Thimble and Thread

  22. #47
    Senior Member mary705's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grammy Dwynn View Post
    IMHO I think it is just a extra step (zig-zag) that I would not care to do. Possibly it would keep one from stretching the fabric to much.

    I put my binding on with my walking foot, after I fold and press.

    Since the walking foot does not have marks/guides, I have worked out a method, for me, to get the seam allowance that I want by moving my needle and using the edge of the foot.

    One method that works for one person may not work for another. Find one that you like and go for it.
    This is the ame way I do my binding. I also use the binding clips (the ones like hair clips) after sewing the binding on.

  23. #48
    Junior Member SandyQuilter's Avatar
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    I assume the reason you get puckers in your binding is that the binding is too long for the quilt edge. Measure the CENTER of the quilt in both directions. That is the length to cut the binding strips, plus extra for corner turns. You shouldn't ever have puckers in your binding doing this. For instance, if the center length is 50 inches and the edge measures 51, cut the binding 50 plus corner allowances. Pin mark the binding and quilt into half and quarters, and pin the binding to the quilt matching the pins. Let the corners hang loose. Stitch the binding to the quilt, easing in the quilt's excess. No puckers and a smooth, non wavy quilt edge.
    SandyQuilter

  24. #49
    Super Member sewNso's Avatar
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    i use a walking foot to attach my binding to the quilt. never have puckers, whether i do the final hemming by hand, or do it on the machine with a zig zag stitch, or decorative stitch.

    and i never measure the length for binding, i just sew a bunch of strips together, fold, iron, hook them together with a large safety pin, hook it to my shirt, and start sewing the binding on.

  25. #50
    Junior Member Donna in Mo's Avatar
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    Luckily, binding is one thing that I never have trouble with. The hardest quilt I did was the Double Wedding Ring. But I got through it pretty good. I always use the IDT on my Pfaff 2144.

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