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Thread: does steel wool really help??

  1. #1
    mim
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    to keep the pins sharp?? I leave quilting stuff here at the cottage in the winter. I am on a salt water river and we do have a lot of fogs, Would the steel wool start to rust?? The pins are stainless steel but I don't think the steel wool is.

    Has anyone tried this at the shore?? -- Mim

  2. #2
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    One can buy those moisture absorber things -

    I've had steel wool get rusty just being under my sink.

  3. #3
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    Haven't tried the steel wool yet. I'm planning to...:) but I would not leave
    the pins in it for a long time specially if there is salt water nearby and/or
    humidity. I would also change the steel wool on a regular basis just to be safe from rust.

  4. #4
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    Steel wool will rust, so I've never heard of it being used to prevent rust on something. Stainless steel, brass, and nickel-plated brass pins are supposed to be rustproof.

  5. #5
    Super Member dakotamaid's Avatar
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    I use sand. Works pretty well.

  6. #6
    Super Member sewwhat85's Avatar
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    i think it would rust

  7. #7
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    YES, but you can also use an SOS pad instead. then place the cushion in a tupperware bowl or ziploc for the winter..should be fine!

  8. #8
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    Yes, it will rust.

    I make little emery bags to clean my pins and needles if they get a little rough spot on them.

    If you can get some raw wool that's only had the first wash, it's still full of lanolin and that's really good stuff for pincushions. :)

  9. #9
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    For the sake of experimentation I just went in my sewing room and made
    one with 2 SOS pads, rolled in batting then covered the whole thing with
    muslin. Nothing fancy. The pins do get sharper but I don't think I'll leave my
    pins in there. You have to work the pins back and forth a few times or
    should I say several times if they are really dull but it does work. A lot of
    work to sharpen a pin. LOL

    Maybe I'll try emery next. The little tomato is completely useless. Don't
    waste your money on that one. I read that they don't even have emery in
    them now. Pfft.

  10. #10
    Super Member dakotamaid's Avatar
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    As I mentioned up above sand works well and is cheap. It is very abrasive, we use it to store our garden hand implements in, helps reduce rust and as you put metal into sand and remove it it will sharpen your edges. If it is completely dry there is no danger of smell or mold. It is also heavy enough you aren't always bumping it off the table or such. Try it, you'll like it!

  11. #11
    mim
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    Oh -- That is a good idea -- storing my trowels, etc in sand. Thank you -- Now - strange as it may seem -- I have to go BUY some sand. I may live on the Atlantic Ocean -- but it is not sandy here -- rocky and lots of clay. I may have some emery here -- unless it is in WA. I remember buying a packet at a quilt show years ago and didn't ever do something with it.

    A lot of people raise sheep near here -- I will see if I can get a small bit of it
    Mim

    Quote Originally Posted by dakotamaid
    As I mentioned up above sand works well and is cheap. It is very abrasive, we use it to store our garden hand implements in, helps reduce rust and as you put metal into sand and remove it it will sharpen your edges. If it is completely dry there is no danger of smell or mold. It is also heavy enough you aren't always bumping it off the table or such. Try it, you'll like it!

  12. #12
    Super Member montanajan's Avatar
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    Sand for garden tools
    Emery to sharpen pins
    Recently saw paper towel spindle used for large cone thread

    As soon as I think I have all I'll want/ need, some bright person on this board gives me another idea & another & another :wink:

  13. #13
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dakotamaid
    As I mentioned up above sand works well and is cheap. It is very abrasive, we use it to store our garden hand implements in, helps reduce rust and as you put metal into sand and remove it it will sharpen your edges. If it is completely dry there is no danger of smell or mold. It is also heavy enough you aren't always bumping it off the table or such. Try it, you'll like it!
    I've had a different experience with sand. I used fine sand for parakeets.
    I liked it for the weight but doesn't do any good sharpening them. In fact
    some of my pins were pretty dull that's why I made the steel pincushion to
    see how that works.

  14. #14
    Super Member Farm Quilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dakotamaid
    I use sand. Works pretty well.
    It works great! Just think sand paper. And if you collect it in your travels, it is a wonderful memory as well. My pin cushion is filled with sand from the banks of the Icicle River and my pins have stayed sharp!

  15. #15
    mim
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    I have white sand from Destin, FL -- I got it from a sand dune in the middle of the island -- not near the salt water.

    I will try it on some of my straight pins that have tiny burrs.

    Mim

    Quote Originally Posted by Farm Quilter
    Quote Originally Posted by dakotamaid
    I use sand. Works pretty well.
    It works great! Just think sand paper. And if you collect it in your travels, it is a wonderful memory as well. My pin cushion is filled with sand from the banks of the Icicle River and my pins have stayed sharp!

  16. #16
    Super Member athomenow's Avatar
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    We have a bucket of sand with oil in it for my hand garden tools. Keeps the rust off and cleans them very nice. And you always know where they are!! Neat trick if you have a messy garage!

  17. #17
    Super Member Greenheron's Avatar
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    One of my husband's ancient "Popular Mechanics" magazines recommended mixing used motor oil into a pail of sand and working the tools up and down several times to clean and oil. (1940's edition.)


    Quote Originally Posted by mim
    Oh -- That is a good idea -- storing my trowels, etc in sand. Thank you -- Now - strange as it may seem -- I have to go BUY some sand. I may live on the Atlantic Ocean -- but it is not sandy here -- rocky and lots of clay. I may have some emery here -- unless it is in WA. I remember buying a packet at a quilt show years ago and didn't ever do something with it.

    A lot of people raise sheep near here -- I will see if I can get a small bit of it
    Mim

    Quote Originally Posted by dakotamaid
    As I mentioned up above sand works well and is cheap. It is very abrasive, we use it to store our garden hand implements in, helps reduce rust and as you put metal into sand and remove it it will sharpen your edges. If it is completely dry there is no danger of smell or mold. It is also heavy enough you aren't always bumping it off the table or such. Try it, you'll like it!

  18. #18
    Senior Member LisaGibbs's Avatar
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    Wow, I find it easier to shop the sales on notions and then as they bend, nick or get to dull I toss them in the garbage. Hummmm, I might try using some of these ideas.

  19. #19
    mim
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    I never worried about rusting and getting dull before -- until we started leaving things for 6 months and going to the other coast. I will be the first to say that we have the best of both worlds. We each paid our dues on the way though. It's finally our turn and we are together to enjoy it. I treasure every day we have.
    Mim

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