Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 43 of 43

Thread: Dryer Fabric Softener Sheets for String Quilts

  1. #26
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Lowell, MA
    Posts
    14,027
    Since we've moved and need to use the community washer and dryer, my DH doesn't want me using dryer sheets, as they do leave a residue. However, when I had my own dryer, I would use the dryer sheet at least twice. I don't see a problem with using "used" dryer sheets for string piecing, as it would not be as thick as using fabric. Just my opinion.

  2. #27
    Junior Member SewOK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Midwest City, OK
    Posts
    143
    Why not buy the really inexpensive ($1.19 yd) muslin to use for foundation piecing and then you don't have to worry about it. I read an article about recycling the dryer sheets for foundation piecing and the writer said that they had use the sheets several years ago for foundation piecing and the white strips ended up having a lot of yellow spots on them after the quilt was washed and dried. Also, a lot of people are allergic to the polyester fibers that come out of those sheets as they are washed and dried, especially children and older people. Also, in case of fire, anything with polyester fibers in it will melt instead of burn.

  3. #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Merritt Island, FL
    Posts
    663
    Blog Entries
    16
    I fold used dryer sheets in 1/8 and touch lightly with a cool iron to flatten and then use them as leaders and enders. My needle seems to glide better and there is a huge saving of thread if you are doing much single item sewing (as opposed to chain piecing) and they are great in preventing the "ears" of triangles from disappearing down the needle hole and creating a jam or messed up pair of triangles from having "chewed up ears".

  4. #29
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Maine-ly Florida
    Posts
    3,452
    We put dryer sheets in the family cottage here and there to keep the mice away in the winter when it's closed up. A relative does the same in her RV. It seems to work. The cottage smells nice too when we open up in the spring. I do use them in the dryer in the winter but rip them in half. I like the tip for bathroom cleanup.

  5. #30
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Dallas area, Texas, USA
    Posts
    2,068
    I stopped using fabric softener of any sort many years ago because my older son is allergic, and more recently I have found other reasons to shun them:
    http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...reener-laundry

    You could get the cheapest, thinnest type of interfacing or muslin to use for foundation piecing, and it would have the added advantage that you can cut it to any size.
    "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." - Voltaire

  6. #31
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    144
    Blog Entries
    2
    I cut the sheets in half and use them a few times....

  7. #32
    Super Member ILoveToQuilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    New Hampshire & Maine
    Posts
    3,050
    Off subject of quilting with dryer sheets...but did you know that if you hang unused, scented dryer sheets inside your tent/camper, etc., the smell repels mosquitoes? Learned this when I was a Boy Scout leader. It does work.

    Anita
    Anita

    The only place that housework comes before quilting is in the dictionary.

  8. #33
    Senior Member Kat Sews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    646
    Quote Originally Posted by Sandrea View Post
    Maybe this is a stupid question but are you using the dryer sheet, to clean the bathroom, straight from the box, or "AFTER" it was used in the dryer??? Sounded like a good tip.
    I use the used ones usually, but if I'm out of used and need one for a quick cleanup (guests comming now) the new ones straight out of the box work just as well.

  9. #34
    Senior Member petthefabric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Eastern Madera County, Ca
    Posts
    957
    We've used new dryer sheets to repel mosquitos and other bugs. We were able to continue sewing on the deck during the "mosquito hour".

    Another use: very well used dryer sheets can be melted (do this outside, heating puts the chemicals into the air-I suppose this is a polutant) to form a lacy mesh, then painted to embelish wall hangings. Melted poly is stiff, don't use on clothing or bed quilts.

  10. #35
    Super Member 1screech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,614
    I would not use them in a quilt...to many allergy problems. They are great for cleaning love bugs off your car.

  11. #36
    Super Member misseva's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    East Arkansas
    Posts
    2,417
    Blog Entries
    3
    I don't use dryer sheets very often so that's not an option for me. BUT I do use them straight out of the box when I have a pan that has cooked on gunk. Just put two in the pan, run water in it and let sit - usually over night. Then use the sheets to wipe out the pan. I suppose you could do the same with liquid fabric softener too.
    TwandasMom

  12. #37
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    983
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks so much for the link Rose_P, I'm printing the site info out for neighbor who's baby has been having a lot of respiratory problems, maybe this is the link as too why the poor thing has been on breathing treatments since he was born 6 months ago.

  13. #38
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Dallas area, Texas, USA
    Posts
    2,068
    Quote Originally Posted by misseva View Post
    I don't use dryer sheets very often so that's not an option for me. BUT I do use them straight out of the box when I have a pan that has cooked on gunk. Just put two in the pan, run water in it and let sit - usually over night. Then use the sheets to wipe out the pan. I suppose you could do the same with liquid fabric softener too.
    Plain old baking soda works extremely well for this and is cheaper and much safer!!!
    "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." - Voltaire

  14. #39
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Dallas area, Texas, USA
    Posts
    2,068
    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
    Thanks so much for the link Rose_P, I'm printing the site info out for neighbor who's baby has been having a lot of respiratory problems, maybe this is the link as too why the poor thing has been on breathing treatments since he was born 6 months ago.
    It hurts to think of a little one suffering needlessly. I hope something helps right away, but I'm pretty sure the doctors would have advised the parents early on to not use fabric softener or scented products of any kind and to double rinse the baby's laundry. I would include the rest of the family's laundry, too because after all, when you hold a baby his face is up against your shirt. The scent isn't the only problem chemical in fabric softener.

    Upshot is still: I wouldn't use fabric softener sheets in a quilt, especially a baby quilt.
    "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." - Voltaire

  15. #40
    Super Member charsuewilson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,203
    Since this thread has morphed into a discussion of dryers and fabric softener, I thought I'd mention that you can use just plain white vinegar instead of softener. And plain white vinegar in the washer will remove the musty odor from towels that were left in the washer too long.

    I'm allergic to virtually all fabric softeners except the original scent of Downey, to all fabric softeners that are in detergents, all dryer sheets, and Tide detergent in particular. It's a very uncomfortable feeling to have to scratch yourself all over, all the time, if someone else washes our clothes and doesn't know about my allergies.

  16. #41
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    407
    Thank you so much for the dryer tip on washing the filter. I would never have thought of it causing a fire.

  17. #42
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Western Catskills
    Posts
    83
    I read--somewhere--a long thread about used dryer sheets for foundations. Not advised--apparently very flammable.

  18. #43
    Power Poster alikat110's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Waco, Texas
    Posts
    15,217
    Blog Entries
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by Nammie to 7 View Post
    No, I don't use dryer sheets for quilting. Don't even use them in the dryer. I like to use fabric as the base for string quilts.
    Me, too. I use Muslin.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.