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Thread: Dying Your Own Fabric for Quilts???

  1. #1
    Senior Member cny_sewer39's Avatar
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    Hello, again. I have a question for you all. I bought fabric and Dylon fabric dye (black) today at Hancock Fabrics. Question #1: Is there a REALLY GOOD fabric dyeing book available? Question #2: What book do you recommend? (if any). Question #3: Have any of you dyed your own fabric for a quilt?
    Question #4: Is it easy to dye fabric? :roll:

    Any help or suggestions would be appreciated...

    :thumbup: debra :thumbup:

  2. #2
    Super Member Dina's Avatar
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    I have not dyed fabric, but I met a quilter at Hancocks who said she regularly dyed the wide muslim backing for quilts. She was very pleased, said her the backs of her quilts always matched the fronts. She did say not to dye in a washing machine...but I can't recall what she did dye stuff in.

    Not much help, huh? Maybe someone else will be. :)

  3. #3
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Here is a website with some ideas :D:D:D

    http://www.pburch.net/dyeing/instructions.shtml

  4. #4
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    seriously if you bought Dylon you don't need any book, just read their directions..If you get in Procion MX dying, then PM me....

  5. #5
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I believe black is actually the most difficult color to achieve with dying.

  6. #6
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    for dying with this type of dye all you need a container to fit the amount of fabric you have. The directions should tell you what you need to do. Dylon dye does not require batching, soda ash, urea, etc...it is much like RIT dye.
    Here is a link to the site:
    http://www.ehow.com/how_6018479_dye-...abric-dye.html

    Just DO NOT use your machine...I have with RIT and it came out OK after another wash with just bleach in the machine, but I would just use a 5 gallon bucket if it is more than 3 yards but less than 10!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    I believe black is actually the most difficult color to achieve with dying.
    NOPE,,true red is...

    black just requires MORE dye per ratio to water..say 3:1, but with Dylon & RIT it is pre measured, no mixing, etc.

    the smaller your container, the less water you will have to deal and the more color you will get...of course you will also have to rinse 3-4 times!

  8. #8
    Super Member jemma's Avatar
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    you can get some great fabrics after dying i used procion dyes just follow instructions ---find a teacher--they do take a lot of rinsing great one off fabrics

  9. #9
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    I have been including my own dyed fabrics in each of my quilts for years now- a great book is:
    the dyer's bible-
    there are quite a few good books available on the subject.
    I recommend visiting Dharma Trading company
    they carry all of the supplies needed- offer lots of free information, tutorials and the customer service staff is great answering questions and helping if there is a problem.
    no it is not (hard) to dye your own fabrics, it is easy, fun and can get you those colors/designs you just can not find in the stores.

  10. #10
    Super Member SueSew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl
    I have been including my own dyed fabrics in each of my quilts for years now- a great book is:
    the dyer's bible-
    there are quite a few good books available on the subject.
    I recommend visiting Dharma Trading company
    they carry all of the supplies needed- offer lots of free information, tutorials and the customer service staff is great answering questions and helping if there is a problem.
    no it is not (hard) to dye your own fabrics, it is easy, fun and can get you those colors/designs you just can not find in the stores.
    How do you dye designs in the fabric? Wax? tie-dye? silk-screen? are they washable? That sounds like something messy and fun!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by SueSew
    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl
    I have been including my own dyed fabrics in each of my quilts for years now- a great book is:
    the dyer's bible-
    there are quite a few good books available on the subject.
    I recommend visiting Dharma Trading company
    they carry all of the supplies needed- offer lots of free information, tutorials and the customer service staff is great answering questions and helping if there is a problem.
    no it is not (hard) to dye your own fabrics, it is easy, fun and can get you those colors/designs you just can not find in the stores.
    How do you dye designs in the fabric? Wax? tie-dye? silk-screen? are they washable? That sounds like something messy and fun!
    RESIST is the easiest way....doing was batiking takes a lot of time, skill and specialized steamers to remove the was...

    I carry ALL of the dye chemicals, resists, dye kits, and even books! Just check my siggy line! I have been dying and teaching about it for about 8 years now....just note that MOST of the batik looks quilters like, actually involve PAINT....BUT you can get some nice pieces with just dying as well.

  12. #12
    Super Member SueSew's Avatar
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    thank you Jacquie I checked your ebay and etsy stores and got the links - I'm going to try dying but maybe not until fall/winter - too much going on now.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by SueSew
    thank you Jacquie I checked your ebay and etsy stores and got the links - I'm going to try dying but maybe not until fall/winter - too much going on now.
    if dying in the fall/winter, you must do it indoors with adequate ventilation and warmth....dyes need to batch a constant temp of about 70-75...once they cool, they lose their potency.

    It is tons of fun though and VERY addictive!

  14. #14
    Super Member SueSew's Avatar
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    uh-oh, I was planning on using the barn, where I can make a mess and Mr Fussy (my husband) won't care. It's cold in there! Thanks for the tip. Well, time to get planning.
    Thanks again
    Sue

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    Quote Originally Posted by SueSew
    uh-oh, I was planning on using the barn, where I can make a mess and Mr Fussy (my husband) won't care. It's cold in there! Thanks for the tip. Well, time to get planning.
    Thanks again
    Sue
    you could use the barn, away from draft, and put some heating pads on a table, cover with a thick towel and a cheap plastic table cloth, then using a cheap (dollar store) plastic cat litter pan or old roasting pan, do low water immersion dying in ziploc bags put the bags in the pan on the heating pads and then cover with a towel and the heat should stay while they 'batch" for 24 hours!

    I have to be creative and have done lots of different things..especially when I started dying while living in the Alaska bush..winter was the best time to dye, but it would get down to -70! I just used the top of my freezer and covered with heavy blankets and the temps stayed good....

    here is some "eye candy" to keep you motivated!

    done with discharge dying, water color pencils, and ink!
    Name:  Attachment-179128.jpe
Views: 29
Size:  57.3 KB

    this piece was painted, dyed, then discharged, and colored back in with pencils and ink!
    Name:  Attachment-179129.jpe
Views: 26
Size:  40.0 KB

    hand dyed brights on black
    Name:  Attachment-179130.jpe
Views: 32
Size:  81.9 KB

    fabrics dyed to match the polka dotted fabric for a guild challenge
    Name:  Attachment-179131.jpe
Views: 26
Size:  56.3 KB

  16. #16
    Super Member SharonC's Avatar
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    I dye my own fabrics when I want different gradations of the multiple colors (Twisted log), and I used a large stock pot. Worked fabulously. I got the info from googling on line and there were so many suggestions.

  17. #17
    Super Member SueSew's Avatar
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    Wow, I love your work. And how you used the fabric in such attractive quilts! I am going to try this for myself and see what I come up with. As soon as all the garden is in and all it needs is 'grooming' - AKA weeding - I am going to get a book and get started.

  18. #18
    Power Poster CarrieAnne's Avatar
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    Jacquie, those are SO pretty! I have only done alittle dying with wool and yarn, never cotton...those are SO pretty!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by SueSew
    Wow, I love your work. And how you used the fabric in such attractive quilts! I am going to try this for myself and see what I come up with. As soon as all the garden is in and all it needs is 'grooming' - AKA weeding - I am going to get a book and get started.
    gather your stuff..make NOTE cards for the steps,
    prep your fabric and store in a sealed bin or baggie and then when you are ready it only takes 5 minutes to mix the dyes and pour them on...then they have to sit for 24 hours to get their color....it is the triple rinsing that takes time...and I line dry....so it goes pretty quick..just don't plan to do 50 pieces at one time..limit yourself to say 3-6 the first time...and only do 1/2 yards or even FQ's...smaller containers can be used and less rinsing time....

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