Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 47 of 47

Thread: End of Seam Veers off

  1. #26

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    23
    I have unpicked more seams that have veered off to the left. My two solutions were to draw a 1/4" seam and sew on the drawn line. The other was to put two 1/4" strips of tape side by side and watch the fabric at the tape instead of the needle. Your eye on the inside of the tape's right edge. Somehow having the second piece of tape in place allowed me to sew a good 1/4". Oh, I have also been known to mark the last 1/2" of the seam line with a marker and ruler when I chain stitch. It's a drag but anything is better than unpicking seams that I have rushed thru.

  2. #27
    Suz
    Suz is offline
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    1,316
    Try using "sizing" rather than the spray starch - very similar results. I find the sizing does not leave the white residue that often happens with the starch. Guess you could always starch on the wrong side of the fabric if you get the residue.

    Suzanne

  3. #28

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    52

    Lots of suggestions and all of them seem to have merit. I'm thinking the idea of the fabric not on the feed dogs completely is a big part of my problem - my needle position doesn't move to the right- if I could do that I think the fabric would be on the feed dogs and under the foot well so that when the needle was moved right I would still get the 1.4 in seam. My struggles over the weekend to do good seams left me with wrinkles between my eyes, face tomato soup red and urge to pick up machine and throw! Am game to try try again - like I told a friend the other day, these mistakes are too much fun to do only once! :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :?:

  4. #29
    Super Member Yvonne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt County, California
    Posts
    1,733
    Marmar, I love your attitude! "these mistakes are too much fun to do only once!" You are absolutely right on!

    One more suggestion that I haven't seen unless I've overlooked it which could ceratinly be, is to slow way down at the end of the seam. Hey, it couldn't hurt. I'm usually in a hurry and want it done, like, yesterday! I think I'm my own worst stitching troll! I'm sure there must be a troll living under my machine that's playing havock with my seams. Couldn't be me!

  5. #30

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    52
    I agree on those trolls under the machine - how could we be doing this all by ourselves? No way - we've gotta have help from somewhere! :wink:

  6. #31
    quiltmaker101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Pensacola, FL
    Posts
    780
    Quote Originally Posted by Yvonne
    When Simply Quilts was on the air they had a show about this. The lady (don't remember who) said that we are in such a hurry to chain piece that we start reaching for the next piece before we are finished with the one under the needle and by not paying attention our seams end up not being 1/4" to the bitter end.
    Her solution... use a stiletto to help guide the seam through to the end and FOCUS on what we're sewing and not reaching for the next piece. It's good advice. Now all I have to do is remember to follow it. It does work when I'm focused! :wink:
    This is true. I watched a video on Square in a Square and she always uses a stiletto to push the fabric along. I find that does help, but I also keep my left hand on the fabric to make sure it doesn't pull away to the left. The more weight on that side, the more it pulls that way.

    Also, I use the 1/4 inch foot for all straight piecing, and I make sure I am watching every piece go through. I hate ripping out seams as much as anyone else!

  7. #32

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    16

    If this suggestion is on the thread already , please forgive - I didn't see it. Because the seam isn't pressed open, you might try puting it under the pressure foot and sewing a seam to straighten the seam that veered. NO ripping out! After it's pressed you can't tell! :twisted: :twisted:

  8. #33
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Out searching for some sunshine :-)
    Posts
    59,092
    Blog Entries
    1
    I have 3 feet that I have been trying out for machine piecing on my new machine. I found that 2 of them work well and one gives me problems, it wants to veer off, and always in the same direction. I used to work in a metal manufacturing shop and so I got to looking at the bottom of the foot and it was poorly manufactured. The foot is not completely flat. I guess one way to check this would be to put some fabric under your foot, lower the presser foot and gently tug on the fabric and see if it pulls out evenly or if it slightly swings to the side. I guess it is like anything else, some good, some not so good. Anyway I thought that I would pass this on as a possiblility to your woes, also.

  9. #34
    Millie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Macomb, Michigan
    Posts
    73
    I have this problem all the time - what a pain. Now I stop a little way before the seam end with needle still in fabric, lift the foot and readjust the fabric. If necessary, I go back and restitch very slowly. Seems to help most of the time. I think it happens because the foot extends beyond the material at the end of the seam and with nothing under it just wanders out of line. Do I just imagine this?

  10. #35
    Senior Member quiltnana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    300
    I watched a class on piecing and she used a small piece of wash away stablizer at the end of her pieces especially ones that needed a sharp point when pressed open to help stablize the end of the fabric and avoid the movement of the 1/4 line that happens at the end. It washes away when the quilt is washed. And the points on stars are perfect and won't tear open. She also mentioned that some 1/4 feet are not 1/4" when you sew with them so you need to measure after you sew to check your foot. I tried this tip on a star border and it worked great.

  11. #36
    bj
    bj is offline
    Super Member bj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ft. Worth, Texas
    Posts
    3,558
    One thing I do that helps me keep my fabric going straight is put a strip of mole skin to the right of the needle on the plate at the 1/4" mark. I can keep the fabric butted up against that and I don't veer nearly as much. I tend to veer to the right (I think I push with my left hand a little) and my seam is a little fatter at the end. With the mole skin as a guide, it's not nearly as big a problem for me. I have to swap the mole skin out pretty often as it gets ragged looking, but it doesn't take a very big piece and it's not terribly expensive. I've seen people on tv use a thickness of painters tape also.

  12. #37
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Clay Springs AZ
    Posts
    3,223
    I was having the same problem and having the foot not liking going over bumps like flying geese. I talked to an expert at the yearly quilt show. She said my machine had wide feed dogs and to replace my 1/4 in foot with an edging foot and adjust my needle to find 1/4 in. I havnt tried it yet but she was right about my foot not covering all the feed dog. This foot will hold the fabric better. Check and see if your dogs are covered by your 1/4 in foot.

  13. #38
    ginnykquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    3
    I also had that problem. I was using a clear foot with a wide space between the "toes". There wasn't enough foot meeting the dog. I changed to a narrower metal foot with more contact and that helped a lot. Also, I found if I press my finger down on the fabric beside the foot during that last inch, it will stay in place. Just stay focused with your finger that close to the needle.


  14. #39
    Super Member Dawn Hendrix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Wilson, NC
    Posts
    1,661
    Just to let you guys know.. since reading this and keeping it in my mind... I have just completed 31 strips ... AND NONE VEER OFF.

    WOOT WOOOOOO finally!

  15. #40
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oh.
    Posts
    798
    I am glad MAR Mar brought this up as I think it helped many of us to focus on that portion of our quilt making. By golly, you have to be a good carpenter to build a house, measuring every step of the way. In the same way we have to make good seams to build a quilt that is eye eppealing with matching seams.

    THANKS LOADS, MAR MAR

  16. #41
    Senior Member Connie1948's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Los Lunas, New Mexico
    Posts
    430
    I start and end all my seams with a small scrap (sleveges are great for this). This way your crooked seams are on scrap not on your piecing. I also find using a straight stitch only plate works great! I always sew with this plate when doing straight stitching. You can even move your needle a space or two if necessary for that perfect scant !/4 inch. Test this first! You can get this plate from your sewing machine dealer. Wishing you great beggining and endings!
    Connie

  17. #42
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Clay Springs AZ
    Posts
    3,223
    I tried the edging foot that covered my dogs and what a difference. No more pulling to the side. It works. The foot is clear with a metal guide just like the 1/4 in foot. You do have to adjust the needle for a 1/4 in seam. Mine came out at 3.0.

  18. #43
    stay-at-home's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    140
    i don't have this problem but i am using a pfaff hobby 1200. best thing for quilting i think. it has this neat little edger you can screw on for keeping the fabric in line at whatever measure you want. it's better that the usual 1/4 quilting foot. it really keeps the fabric in line and my seams always line up = well, almost always! worth looking into if you are buying a new machine.
    Jeanne

  19. #44
    stay-at-home's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    140
    well the problem could be solved by sewing onto a water soluble stabilizer the last inch or so. in fact, any stabilizer would do if you don't care if it's embedded in the seam. however, it would be alot of work if you are talking about small squares.

  20. #45
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    MS
    Posts
    3,486
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by marmar
    When making a 1/4 in seam I've always had a problem with the fabric wanting to go to the left and the end of the seam is too narrow. I've always fought this but to no avail! I'm now using a wooden toothpick to help hold it in place but still does the little trick . Any of you have this problem - fess up. :( :( :(
    I have spoiled myself making Bargello's with 2 1/2" strips. Now I want to move on and feel like I don't know how to sew when I try to make half square triangles. I didn't worry about a precise 1/4" or scant 1/4" seam allowance on the Bargello's, I was just consistent with what I did use (fat 1/4th).
    I do want to be precise on the half square triangles so my pieces will fit and I won't lose my points. I recognized quickly that I need to learn how to make a 1/4" (or scant) seam allowance. I used our search function and have been reading posts. This post has so much good information in it I wanted to share it with you guys. It is a very old post and has some of our first members in it.
    I hope you will enjoy it as much as I did.

  21. #46
    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    9,458
    Blog Entries
    31
    A toothpick is mighty small. I use a chopstick as a stiletto to keep my fabric on line. It keeps my figers away from the needle.
    peace :D

  22. #47
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    home again, after 27 yrs!
    Posts
    15,677
    Blog Entries
    2
    if you have most of the fabric to the left of your needle, keep your hand on that all the way through. the feed dogs do tend to pull on fabric a bit.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.