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Thread: End of Seam Veers off

  1. #1

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    When making a 1/4 in seam I've always had a problem with the fabric wanting to go to the left and the end of the seam is too narrow. I've always fought this but to no avail! I'm now using a wooden toothpick to help hold it in place but still does the little trick . Any of you have this problem - fess up. :( :( :(

  2. #2
    community benefactor Knot Sew's Avatar
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    I find myself doing it...........I'm ok if I keep my mind on what I am doing...I think it was leftover from making clothes.....like darts :D

  3. #3

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    Ruth - this happens even tho' I'm doing my very best to keep the end of the seam straight. Is it the machine? Do you have any remedys other than pay attention? :?

  4. #4
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    Now I have a good excuse for the very same problem. I did dressmaking for years, but I don't recall having tht problem with seams in general.

    I have heard that some sewing machines sew really straight seams, so I am wondering if the feed dogs do not carry the fabric through in a straight line? I started quilting about 7 years ago and soon realized I had this problem. I have tried to keep my mind focused on that bit at the end of the seam, but I come out with that end of the seam narrower than the beginning. I am totally frustrated.

    Either I need a new machine (which ones DON'T do this.
    or I need a new set of eyes?

    So, MarMar, you are not alone with this stupid problem. I flip the piece over and start from the opposite end (sometimes) but it is a general nuisance!

    Help!!! June in Cincinnati

  5. #5
    Norah's Avatar
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    I have that problem, too. I think I have a tendency to pull it that way with my guiding hand. A pin helps, but I do have to pay attention. Maybe the feeder dogs are pulling it htat way. Also, adjusting the pressure on the foot may help.

  6. #6
    Steve's Avatar
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    Mine does that too, though I find gently guiding the fabric from behind helps. If it gets too bunched up behind the machine, that is when I have problems. Fold, roll, or scoot the material away as it goes through.

  7. #7
    community benefactor Knot Sew's Avatar
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    maybe we should try going wider at the end and see what happens.
    IITYWYBMAB :wink:

  8. #8
    cynde's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruth Camp
    maybe we should try going wider at the end and see what happens.
    IITYWYBMAB :wink:
    OK what does IITWYBMAB mean?

  9. #9
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    Steve, this happens even when I am sewing very short seams. I can certainlly see where longer seams would tend to bunch up, but ones that are 2 1/2 up to about 6 inches don't have much chance to bunch. Thanks anyway.

    Come on guys, we need more answers!!!

    Where are the experts?

    June

  10. #10
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    ifitellyouwillyoubuymeabeer?

    I think it has something to do with the 1/4" and at the end the feed dogs don't have enough to hold onto so it gets crooked, now if only I had a solution!

  11. #11

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    Aha! I thought it might have something to do with the pressure foot and feed dog! I never hear anyone whining about this and I have finally felt defeated with my nice straight seam but the doing what it wants at the very end. Well. Remedies, anyone? Marmar

  12. #12
    cynde's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kathy
    ifitellyouwillyoubuymeabeer?
    Thank you, it was driving me crazy. I even went to the "Net Abbreviations" site.

  13. #13
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    It might help if you sew onto another piece of fabric. That also catches the threads. I like to start and end chains of seams with little swatches for that reason.

  14. #14
    Super Member Moonpi's Avatar
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    I think Cathe is on the right track - I do this too. Another reason could be the weight on long runs, pulling one way or another

  15. #15
    Super Member Yvonne's Avatar
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    When Simply Quilts was on the air they had a show about this. The lady (don't remember who) said that we are in such a hurry to chain piece that we start reaching for the next piece before we are finished with the one under the needle and by not paying attention our seams end up not being 1/4" to the bitter end.
    Her solution... use a stiletto to help guide the seam through to the end and FOCUS on what we're sewing and not reaching for the next piece. It's good advice. Now all I have to do is remember to follow it. It does work when I'm focused! :wink:

  16. #16
    lin
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    This happens to me too sometimes when I'm not paying attention. I try to keep the index finger of my left hand up close to the presser foot when I'm coming to the end of a seam. When I remember to keep it close and hold the fabric in position, the seam comes out normal.

    I like cathe's idea too. I don't seem to have the problem when I'm chain piecing because I have another piece of fabric right there in position just before the end of the seam. I think that's doing the same thing for me as what cathe suggested to you. :)

  17. #17
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    lin, cathe and the others are right, i'm afraid. we have to pay attention. (not good. :cry: i'm too easily distracted by shiny objects. )

    i just experimented with about 4 different feet - including an "official" quarter-inch foot. the feed dogs definitely pull the fabric off line toward the end. i'll bet it happens on all machines. i'll also bet kathy came up with the right reason why.

    the foot that came the closest to keeping the fabric feeding through in a straight line without help was my rolling foot. a few of the scraps went wonky at the end, but most stayed straight to within one thread. it was also the foot that required the least help/lightest touch straightening back out when i saw it happening.

    i didn't try my walking foot. too big a pain to put on and take off. i don't like using it anyway. too noisy. one of those might do a better job of keeping the fabric straight, though. (if they don't, they need to stop selling them as "even feed" feet, don'tch think? LOL)

  18. #18
    Suz
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    My 4Hers had a similar problem, so I gave then a sandwich pick (stronger and longer than a toothpick) as I don't want those little fingers getting hurt. They call it a "picker" and if the needle is going to hit something, I'd rather it be wooden vs. metal (seam ripper or pin).

    And I also suggest using the walking foot. I find that it is on my machine most of the time. I just find I have better control and am happier with my results.

    Suzanne

  19. #19

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    Sewing on another piece doesn't do it --- I measured this am (early) and it begins about a scant 1/2 in or less from the end. Dray - I'm concrntrating because it's been a problem for so long. - use a stilleto (toothpick) , both hands, eyes, get my nose out of joint, and it's like gravel in my peanut butter! Evidently my cross to bear, huh! :? :? :?

  20. #20
    Super Member Yvonne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marmar
    Sewing on another piece doesn't do it --- I measured this am (early) and it begins about a scant 1/2 in or less from the end. Dray - I'm concrntrating because it's been a problem for so long. - use a stilleto (toothpick) , both hands, eyes, get my nose out of joint, and it's like gravel in my peanut butter! Evidently my cross to bear, huh! :? :? :?
    BUT are you holding your tongue just so?
    :mrgreen:

  21. #21
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    shame on you, yvonne! of course she is! it's just that her dog is facing in the wrong direction when she sews. :lol:

    seriously, though, marmar ... i don't know whether this would help or not but try changing to a smaller needle size and changing needles more often. and look for a foot with a nice wide bottom that will hold onto the fabric for as long as possible.

    2 more questions: (1) do you sew with pins? (2) do you starch your fabrics? everything is so much easier for me if my fabric is well starched. (ok ... less difficult; fewer disasters; wouldn't go so far as to imply that everything is easy for me. soooooooooo not the case. LOL)


  22. #22
    lin
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    Gosh, if you're doing all that to try to keep them straight, then I don't know what to tell you. It sounds like you're doing everything right. I like Patrice's idea of a different, wider presser foot. Something's gotta work!

  23. #23
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    Marmar,
    You have the right idea using a toothpick, but that puts your fingers really close to the needle. Try a small bamboo skewer instead. They are about $1 for a pkg of 20 at the grocery store.
    It helps when I slow down a little towards the end, too.

  24. #24
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    Yvonne, I notice this happening even when I don't chain piece. Also I think the idea of stitching onto another piece of fabric would work, but what then? And please don't you dare tell me the seam ripper is my best buddy, we're already on a first name basis. :roll:

  25. #25
    Steve's Avatar
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    Patrice, I feel so foolish, I never even gave a thought to simply using starch. If you were here, I'd give you a big hug and kiss. Thanks from the bottom of my heart, you're truly a God send! :thumbup:

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