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Thread: Ever "too much" quilting?

  1. #76
    Junior Member quilt_happy's Avatar
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    I agree. Sometimes too much quilting makes it stiff. I like my quilts cushiony, if you know what I mean. Sometimes I only tie my quilts.

  2. #77
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    I like a medium amount of quilting. I don't want my quilts to feel like a mattress pad! I love hand quilting but have too much arthritis in my fingers to do very much of it so have to be content to do SID or something fairly simple as I have not achieved great success with free motion quilting yet. Can't afford the long arm quilters.

  3. #78
    Senior Member GloBug's Avatar
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    Whether I do a lot or a little quilting depends on what it will be used for, If it is to be used as a spread I prefer more stitching. If it is used as a quilt for warmth less stitching or even tied as then it snuggles around you better, For a baby I always quilt as ties can be dangerous.
    Happy Quilting to all.:)

  4. #79
    Member rnjoy's Avatar
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    I think outline or mirror image is nice but if it were mine I would do some trapunto to add dimension. I have done some by just adding an extra layer of batting behind the object, outline stitch around the figure then cut off the excess and add a line of stitching around the eyes, ears and legs etc. Have fun with it.

  5. #80
    Senior Member barbrdunn's Avatar
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    I have always been taught that there are really only two considerations necessary when determining the amount of quilting needed on a quilt. Both have been mentioned, but I would like to mention them again. The first thing that is most important, is the amount of quilting that is recommended by the batting used. That is why I like Warm and Natural. It can be quilted 8-10" apart. Some of the other batting requires quilting at 2-4". Otherwise they will not hold up to washings. Whatever amount of quilting you choose to do, it should be evenly balanced throughout the quilt. If you use heavy quilting in one area, all the other areas should be heavily stitched. If you choose to go easy on quilting, go easy over the whole quilt. Especially if it is for a wall hanging. If it is not equally quilted it tends not to hang well. I personally like to SID to stabilize the quilt, but then add a small amount of free motion quilting in the blocks and borders. If I appplique, I outline the applique. I also love to do vines as they are easiest for me and are very forgiving.

  6. #81
    Senior Member SharonD's Avatar
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    He is beautiful, to put quilt over the top of him just wouldn't do him justice. I would do SID.

  7. #82
    Senior Member DeniseP's Avatar
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    I understand what you're saying. Sometimes I look at a picture of a beautifully pieced quilt that I know was more work than I will ever try for and I lose the piecing because the quilting ON the piecing is so beautifully done. I think the quilting itself is an art, but it should not overshadow the piecing which is the original part of "quilting".

  8. #83
    Super Member Kitsie's Avatar
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    I agree wholeheartedly! Sometimes the quilting obscures the pattern and dulls the colors. And as others say, feel stiff. IMO

    I did too much on one quilt and with monofilament and am not happy at all with that quilt even tho the pattern is beautiful.

  9. #84
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kitsie
    I agree wholeheartedly! Sometimes the quilting obscures the pattern and dulls the colors. And as others say, feel stiff. IMO

    I did too much on one quilt and with monofilament and am not happy at all with that quilt even tho the pattern is beautiful.
    I had one quilt LAQed with monofilament and I don't like it all. I think it has pokies and it is a little stiff.

  10. #85
    Power Poster Annaquilts's Avatar
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    Nope I agree. Also I am into making functional quilts. I have had only one quilt Long arm quilted due to size and am very greatful the woman did not over do it. I do not like too much quilting for functional quilts as it tends to make the quilt heavy and stiff. I guess it is what you are looking for.

    I also prefer the people to ooohhh and aaaahhhh over my work instead of the long arm quilting that I hired out. This is one of the reasons I quilt my own quilts if I can. I love seeing the work of any quilting long or hand but prefer to have done the whole quilt myself. Now if I would own a long arm quilting machine. That would be nice.

  11. #86
    violetwoods's Avatar
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    I ALSO THINK THE WAY YOU DO ,CALL ME OLD FASHION OR JUST OLD.

  12. #87
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    I've been told that although monofilament is nice to use, it is made of plastic and, like all plastics, will eventually get brttle. Then the seams etc. could come apart. After all your hard work, that would not be a nice thing to happen!

  13. #88
    Senior Member QUILT4JOY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SharonAnne
    I am glad for this discussion because as a new quilter, I have been baffled about the quilting part. Granted, I have yet to take a class, but I have done a lot of looking at pictures on this board. I love each and every one of the quilts/projects I have seen, and the quilting of feathers, curliques, etc is exquisite, but still, I am afraid to do it. As an example, I am attaching a picture that I still do not know what to do with. I think it is beautiful "as is" and am scared to ruin the simplicity and beauty of the cat by running thread all over him. Small projects such as potholders and placemats can "take" and often demand a lot of stippling, but I want this quilt to be natural. So, my dilemna is - should I or shouldn't I do anything but SID on this one. Can't make up my mind, thus this has sat as a UFO since February, 2010. I don't need it until Christmas, so I still have some time to deal with it. And this is my problem with all my projects. Is less more? Is more too much? Does this come with experience or is it a personal like/dislike thing? Thanks for listening and for your potential comments. Oops, how do I put my photo here?
    The cat quilt is sooo beautiful Sharon. If you wanted to play around a little you could follow the edges of some of the leaves. Like you, I'm fairly new to learning the quilting part of the process, and I like my own quilts to be less quilted and fluffier. When I first started, I took apart a quilt from WalMart because I thought the batting had bundled up. It hadn't and so my first quilts were widely spaced, very widely spaced. I was actually very suprised when the batting instructions would say quilt no more than 3" to 4" apart. Experiment Sharon. There are no rules. I send my Personal "rejects" to friends and family. Not really rejects, but closer batting stitching than I like on my own bed. I experiment on every quilt; trying out the different styles that I run across. :roll: ;)

  14. #89
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TX GMimi
    I've been told that although monofilament is nice to use, it is made of plastic and, like all plastics, will eventually get brttle. Then the seams etc. could come apart. After all your hard work, that would not be a nice thing to happen!
    It would be okay with me if the quilting on my Dresden came apart, because then I would quilt it with thread and I would like it much better. It is just too big of a pain to take it out, or I would.

  15. #90
    Super Member Maggiemay's Avatar
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    This has been an interesting thread to follow- lots of different opinion on the subject!

  16. #91
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    I noted that one person stated that tieing quilts was dangerous for children. Not so. I use a double surgeon's knot and haven't lost a tie in 40 years! I have several very old quilts that were tied and there are no ties missing. Perhaps it depends on how well they are tied and what kind of knot is used.

  17. #92
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    Im so glad this discussion came up I guess you can consider me new to quilting I only have 3 quilts that I have completed for all three Ive done stitch in the ditch and Im very proud of them. I felt they were softer and I made them so that the family can cuddle. Ive admired and awed at the pictures that have been posted on this site. I will admit that I felt as though I might not be considered a quilter because of the way I have finished my quilts but in reading some of the opinions posted I feel like I can call myself a quilter and be proud. Someday I hope to make a quilt and really do a masterpiece as I have seen here but until then Im proud to say Im A Quilter . I believe that if a person spends so much time and effort that if you are satisfied then it is perfect do your best and your best will be great.

  18. #93
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lclang
    I noted that one person stated that tieing quilts was dangerous for children. Not so. I use a double surgeon's knot and haven't lost a tie in 40 years! I have several very old quilts that were tied and there are no ties missing. Perhaps it depends on how well they are tied and what kind of knot is used.
    Charities in my area will not accept a tied quilt for babies!

  19. #94
    MNM
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    Quote Originally Posted by lclang
    I noted that one person stated that tieing quilts was dangerous for children. Not so. I use a double surgeon's knot and haven't lost a tie in 40 years! I have several very old quilts that were tied and there are no ties missing. Perhaps it depends on how well they are tied and what kind of knot is used.
    What is a double surgeon's knot, some of my knots come loose. I have always used a square knot twice. Perhaps you could show us the knot you use. Thanks. MNM

  20. #95
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    Too much quilting is toooo much and I think takes away from the creativity of the fabric and quilt design.

  21. #96
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    A surgeon's know it wrapped twice to the left and pulled tight, then wrapped twice to the right and then pulled tight. I do not use heavy yarns, only crochet thread or baby yarn or embroidery floss. Some charities have been scared out by the rumor that they are dangerous to babies, but if they are properly tied I have never lost a single tie. They are certainly appropriate for older children and lap quilts for older people and so far as I know there are no bans on those.

  22. #97
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lclang
    A surgeon's know it wrapped twice to the left and pulled tight, then wrapped twice to the right and then pulled tight. I do not use heavy yarns, only crochet thread or baby yarn or embroidery floss. Some charities have been scared out by the rumor that they are dangerous to babies, but if they are properly tied I have never lost a single tie. They are certainly appropriate for older children and lap quilts for older people and so far as I know there are no bans on those.
    I wasn't making a judgment one way or the other, because I LAQ. I just know this is the way it is where I live.

  23. #98
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    Yes, I agree. Some of the quilting is absolutely beautiful, but that's what my eye goes to immediately, not even seeing the fabrics or quilt top pattern. I think the quilting should enhance the quilt, not outdo it. I have a HQ 16, which I love and just learning. But, after learning more, I still will not want to overdo the quilt. Just my opinion.

  24. #99
    Member JustBonnie2's Avatar
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    I was just at a quilt show today in Pittsburg, KS and one quilt had a criticism from the judge that said "too much quilting." A lady standing next to me couldn't believe it.

    Personally, I don't like so much quilting on a bed quilt or lap quilt, because it makes them stiff, not snuggly. Wall quilts, I don't care.

  25. #100
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    I believe there are "Art" quilts and then there are "Love" quilts.
    One is for looking at and one is for using.

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