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Thread: Flange between quilt blocks and border?

  1. #1
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    Flange between quilt blocks and border?

    I want just a touch of color between the blocks and a black border. Will it look OK to put a flange in there, or should it just be a very narrow first border?

  2. #2
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    I have done a flange. It really gives the quilt a nice little pop of color.

  3. #3
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    A flange can be nice .... or the very narrow border.

    Keep in mind that a flange will cover up the centre part a wee bit.
    So if you have points out to the edge, they will get covered by the flange.

    In that case ... a narrow border will give you that tiny pop of colour and not affect the inner piecework.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltE View Post
    A flange can be nice .... or the very narrow border.

    Keep in mind that a flange will cover up the centre part a wee bit.
    So if you have points out to the edge, they will get covered by the flange.

    In that case ... a narrow border will give you that tiny pop of colour and not affect the inner piecework.

    Just turn the flange out toward the border instead of inward.

  5. #5
    Power Poster feline fanatic's Avatar
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    How are you planning on quilting it? If sent out to a longarmer flanges can be very troublesome and often add to the cost. If quilting yourself, they can also cause the same issues in that it is difficult to avoid them and not quilt over them and sometimes when you quilt over them they catch under the foot and get stitched down going the wrong way.

    If you are hand quilting then flanges are usually no problem at all as you can easily avoid quilting on them when doing by hand.

  6. #6
    Super Member ArtsyOne's Avatar
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    I would stick with a 1/4" stop border - it's so much easier than trying to figure out how to quilt around a flange.
    A fabric stash is always missing that one fabric needed to finish the quilt on which you're working.

  7. #7
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by popover View Post
    Just turn the flange out toward the border instead of inward.
    This what I'd do.
    Patrice S

    Bernina Artista 180, Singer 301a, Featherweight Centennial, Rocketeer, Juki 2200 QVP Mini, White 1964 Featherweight

  8. #8
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    How about using a flanged binding? I have started doing that method and absolutely love it.

  9. #9
    Senior Member LilaKay's Avatar
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    I fellow quilter in our park put a narrow flange on one of her quilts and had a real problem quilting it. She said she would never do that again!


    Quote Originally Posted by feline fanatic View Post
    How are you planning on quilting it? If sent out to a longarmer flanges can be very troublesome and often add to the cost. If quilting yourself, they can also cause the same issues in that it is difficult to avoid them and not quilt over them and sometimes when you quilt over them they catch under the foot and get stitched down going the wrong way.

    If you are hand quilting then flanges are usually no problem at all as you can easily avoid quilting on them when doing by hand.
    LilaKay...greatgramma to Brielle Mae

  10. #10
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    Why not do a solid piping like Susan Cleveland teaches. Just that little bit of color marks a nice division.

  11. #11
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    The flange always looks good but I do agree with quilting it. I did one that way and was constantly looking to see where I was to try to avoid flipping the edges back on itself. It was a pain, but does look nice. I quilted it myself on my longarm.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by MadQuilter View Post
    How about using a flanged binding? I have started doing that method and absolutely love it.
    I agree...............

  13. #13
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    I have done flanges and it is a great way to add a little interest between the main body and the border. Adds a little dimension that I love.

  14. #14
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    A flanged binding is on the outer edge of the quilt and this person wants something between the body and the border. I too like a flanged binding but I also love the flange around the main body of the quilt.
    Quote Originally Posted by MadQuilter View Post
    How about using a flanged binding? I have started doing that method and absolutely love it.

  15. #15
    Power Poster ube quilting's Avatar
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    A flange is easier too.
    no act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. Aesop

  16. #16
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    It really does come down to how it will be quilted. If it is being longarmed (especially with a panto), the flange will be a huge headache. If you're quilting it on a domestic machine it will be less of a problem, because you will be able to easily keep track of it. It can still get flipped around if you FMQ over it, though, so when you plan your quilting try not to cross it.

    If it's going to be longarmed, I would suggest a very narrow border instead.

  17. #17
    Power Poster ube quilting's Avatar
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    When I do very narrow borders I cut them maybe 1/2" wider than I want them and trim them to the width I want after it is sewn on. Even with starching I end up with distorted edges, so trimming after gives me a straighter edge.
    no act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. Aesop

  18. #18
    Super Member duckydo's Avatar
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    I love putting a flange on mine, it really sets it off.

  19. #19
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    my cousin is a long armer and I asked her about it once. She said she just holds that area back.

  20. #20
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    I've found that a flange can really add something special to a quilt border. Go for it.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by tessagin View Post
    my cousin is a long armer and I asked her about it once. She said she just holds that area back.
    That works if you're quilting from the front of the machine, but if you're doing a panto you aren't even looking at the quilt top, so the flange can easily get flipped.

  22. #22
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    A 1/4th inch border is the easiest to put on. I cut a strip 3/4 of an inch. Sew on the first side, then run your quarter inch foot right against the last sewing and you have the perfect 1/4 inch line there. I put an orange strip like that on a quilt with black background fabric this spring. Turned out fantastically.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  23. #23
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    What is a flange never heard of that one before.

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