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Thread: FMQ question

  1. #1
    Senior Member quiltingnd's Avatar
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    FMQ question

    I have watched videos on YouTube and tried my hand on sandwich squares by fmq.. But I noticed the bigger the sandwich the more awkward it was for me to figure out where to go (direction wise) and how to maneuver the quilt sandwich itself. I an scared to try an actual quilt because I don't want to ruin it. Does anyone have a link that shows someone meandering fmq and using something bigger than a table mat so that I know what it looks like and how to move my quilt?

  2. #2
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    Hi there, I think a good way to practice is doodling with pencil and paper. It is the hand/eye coordination that needs to be developed, at least it was for me.

    JulieM

  3. #3
    Super Member jgriinke's Avatar
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    You might want to check Leah Day' s, free motion quilting project. She has a quilt along on th e site also, where she shows how to pin baste and deal with a larger quilt.
    We don' t start out doing the great job she does, it takes lots of practice.

  4. #4
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    In reality, when you FMQ on anything, from a placemat to a king, you are actually only going to be working on a 'table mat' section at a time. The whole quilt is there, but you can only work on a small section. Position the quilt in your machine and so that the weight is supported by tables. Pick out an 8 or 9 inch square area you want to work on. Now puddle (nest? scrunch?) up some of the quilt around this area so you can move the square freely. Quilt this square and stop at the edge of the area. Stop, readjust the quilt so the adjacent area can move freely and do this section. don't know if this helps.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  5. #5
    Super Member JulieR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaperPrincess View Post
    In reality, when you FMQ on anything, from a placemat to a king, you are actually only going to be working on a 'table mat' section at a time. The whole quilt is there, but you can only work on a small section. Position the quilt in your machine and so that the weight is supported by tables. Pick out an 8 or 9 inch square area you want to work on. Now puddle (nest? scrunch?) up some of the quilt around this area so you can move the square freely. Quilt this square and stop at the edge of the area. Stop, readjust the quilt so the adjacent area can move freely and do this section. don't know if this helps.
    Exactly! I think it was in a Leah Day video where I first heard to focus on one small area at a time so you don't get lost. It works for me!

  6. #6
    Super Member Weezy Rider's Avatar
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    What do they call quilting that uses the old stencil patterns then? Don't you FMQ those? Who works with those?

    I don't care for the all-over bit. Right now I have some strips that I might like to do a couple of ovals on, then straight stitch some others. I'd like a site that shows that method. I've got some books - Leah Day does have some decent practice techniques, but I don't like the finished style. I'm playing with that quilt sampler, and I simply don't see the fills she is using. My vision for the blocks is totally different.

    I guess I want a tutorial about mock hand quilting, FMQ style. I want to highlight the fabric and color, not machine skills in particular. I think the mock, using patterns would require finer control.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JulieM View Post
    Hi there, I think a good way to practice is doodling with pencil and paper. It is the hand/eye coordination that needs to be developed, at least it was for me.

    JulieM
    This was the way I learned control and still will doodle if I want to try something different.
    When life gives you scraps, make a quilt.

  8. #8
    Senior Member vivientan's Avatar
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    For a start, it may help if u grab some quilt stencils and trace the designs onto them before doing FMQ. Or u could print out some simple designs on paper and quilt on it, just for practice. Meandering or stippling is a good design to start with. I'm a beginner to FMQ too and still struggling with it! But the more I practice, the more I feel at ease with FMQ. I think the first hurdle is to overcome the fear and just do it! Good luck!

  9. #9
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    I believe someone did a tutorial on QB on how to predict your path for FMQ meander. I believe she marked the main directions? Look in tutorials to see if it would work for you.

  10. #10
    Super Member hobbykat1955's Avatar
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    I'm in the same boat but I belong to the DQ swap and I practice on all of those..Everyone is understanding in that swap if it doesn't turn out so well.

  11. #11
    Super Member JulieR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weezy Rider View Post
    What do they call quilting that uses the old stencil patterns then? Don't you FMQ those? Who works with those?

    I don't care for the all-over bit. Right now I have some strips that I might like to do a couple of ovals on, then straight stitch some others. I'd like a site that shows that method. I've got some books - Leah Day does have some decent practice techniques, but I don't like the finished style. I'm playing with that quilt sampler, and I simply don't see the fills she is using. My vision for the blocks is totally different.

    I guess I want a tutorial about mock hand quilting, FMQ style. I want to highlight the fabric and color, not machine skills in particular. I think the mock, using patterns would require finer control.
    I used her tutorials to learn how to FMQ; once you know how you can use any motif you want. I've found using stencils and marked lines to be MUCH easier than free form quilting. But maybe that's just me.

    Look for tutorials on marking quilt tops. You'll learn what you need there.

  12. #12
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weezy Rider View Post
    What do they call quilting that uses the old stencil patterns then? Don't you FMQ those? Who works with those?

    I don't care for the all-over bit. Right now I have some strips that I might like to do a couple of ovals on, then straight stitch some others. I'd like a site that shows that method. I've got some books - Leah Day does have some decent practice techniques, but I don't like the finished style. I'm playing with that quilt sampler, and I simply don't see the fills she is using. My vision for the blocks is totally different.

    I guess I want a tutorial about mock hand quilting, FMQ style. I want to highlight the fabric and color, not machine skills in particular. I think the mock, using patterns would require finer control.
    I would get some fabric with a bold print. make some sandwiches up and practice FMQing on the lines of the print. When you can follow the lines pretty well, then you can use stencils to mark your fabric and quilt on the lines.
    The reason why machine quilters like the patterns they do instead of the traditional quilting motifs is you have to constantly stop and tie off your threads. Many traditional patterns are stand alone motifs where the more modern FMQ patterns let you do all your quilting without stopping, tying off, and restarting all the time.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  13. #13
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    I would suggest that you go to Leah Days site start from lesson one, for some one so young she has some very sound advice, she certainly helped me gain confidence in my own quilting capabilities.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaperPrincess View Post
    In reality, when you FMQ on anything, from a placemat to a king, you are actually only going to be working on a 'table mat' section at a time. The whole quilt is there, but you can only work on a small section. Position the quilt in your machine and so that the weight is supported by tables. Pick out an 8 or 9 inch square area you want to work on. Now puddle (nest? scrunch?) up some of the quilt around this area so you can move the square freely. Quilt this square and stop at the edge of the area. Stop, readjust the quilt so the adjacent area can move freely and do this section. don't know if this helps.
    Very nicely explained.

  15. #15
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    That hesitation and "figuring out where to go next" are difficult to overcome.

    Get a Dry Erase board or even large sketch tablet and pencil. Doodle one design until you don't even have to think about where you're going next. I do this with every new design I try. I draw it until I can almost do it with my eyes closed. When I sit down to the machine, the mechanics are different, but I don't have that hesitation about where to go next.

  16. #16
    Super Member Pinkiris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    I believe someone did a tutorial on QB on how to predict your path for FMQ meander. I believe she marked the main directions? Look in tutorials to see if it would work for you.

    I bookmarked the thread that Tartan refers to: http://www.quiltingboard.com/tutoria...g-t177072.html. It is an easy way to focus your meandering. Good luck!
    Sue

  17. #17
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    I agree about Leah Day. Every time I'm ready to start FMQ I review her videos and where I am in the process.

  18. #18
    Senior Member quiltingnd's Avatar
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    Thank you!!!

  19. #19
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    I am told that many questions get a stencil and mark it until they get the rhythm. It aparantly works.

  20. #20
    Super Member virtualbernie's Avatar
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    Craftsy has a class: Quilting Big Projects on a Small Machine by Ann Petersen. She teaches how to break the quilt down into smaller chunks so that you know where to go next.
    Bernie

  21. #21
    Super Member Weezy Rider's Avatar
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    Since I do QAYG - a large quilt wouldn't exist. I just like the looks of the motifs, and also like Sashiko. I've been tracing patterns I have on cheap muslin and playing with staying on the lines. It ain't easy. I've got a quilt going now - just figured out how to do the blocks - mostly straight, but one strip is crying out for connected ovals. I can do them with a regular machine, but turning and twisting the fabric is a pain. I did a wall hanging with a cabin - the roof was crying out for fish scales and I just didn't feel like trying it with a regular stitch. If I can get it into the computer, I can manipulate anything.

    I also don't mind using backstitching. That used to be done. Or small stitches in place. You have knots and tie-offs if you machine embroider those stencils in the hoop.

    Thanks

  22. #22
    Super Member deedum's Avatar
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    Doodling on paper is good. I also, suggest you get a large piece of felt to practice on. If you have a start button on yr machine, that helps a lot with speed. Be sure to check the back often to make sure there is no eyelashes. You will know when you are ready & comfortable to FM a quilt after some practice. It takes. Time and patience.

  23. #23
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    I agree with Paper Princess, but really, you should just grab it and go. It is the only way to become successful. I sat on the sidelines for a long time as I was worried that I would ruin my "lovely" work. A friend asked me to help her quilt some charity quilts (knowing this would force me into action) and so after practicing on those quilts, I just grab a quilt and start meandering...all the best with it. You will gain confidence with practice.

  24. #24
    Senior Member cat-on-a-mac's Avatar
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    here is a site that talks about how to section off your quilt for fmq. I tried this approach once and it did help.
    http://themodernquiltguild.com/2012/...-larger-quilt/
    Cathy

  25. #25
    Super Member Weezy Rider's Avatar
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    So far- no eyelashes, but lots of different sized stitches. Does craft felt work or isn't it heavy enough? You can get that really cheap. Cut it and leave a stack of it where it's easy to get at. No pins.

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