Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 22 of 22

Thread: Gifted with handmade quilting frame

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    39

    Gifted with handmade quilting frame

    I have received a lovely oak quilting frame from my friend who had made it for his mother, who no longer can quilt. I'm probably not going to use it for hand quilting, but wondering if anyone has experience "repurposing" this lovely tool. It's all in pieces now; one of its benefits for storage. I'm wondering if it could be used for gluing ot pinning the sandwich? I'm a pretty new quilter...

  2. #2
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Lake Elsinore, CA
    Posts
    12,428
    What a nice gift! I've never used one, but I have heard of them being used for pinning a quilt sandwich. It could also be used if you decide to tie a quilt.

  3. #3
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Central NJ
    Posts
    4,623
    I'd definitely use it for sandwiching! Wish I had room to even store one just for that purpose. I hand quilt but don't know that I could ever do it on a floor frame. But the sandwiching process - gotta be easier than alot of other processes.

  4. #4
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Piedmont Virginia in the Foothills of the Blue Ridge Mtns.
    Posts
    8,212
    As soon as you decide to get rid of it, you will want it for handquilting -- ask me how I know that!

    I now use a hoop for my personal quilts, but I keep a vintage floor frame like this one for a "community learning quilt" that goes to shows, fund-raising events, art-in-the-park venues, and to teach school kids about the art of quilting during their "Heritage Week." Everyone from 4 to 94 years old has quilted on this one over the 25 years I've done this. Lots of stitches put in, many taken out and the blocks re-quilted by others.
    Just hang onto it. I don't care for them for basting; a table surface and clamps is better in my opinion.

    Jan in VA
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Jan in VA
    Living in the foothills
    peacefully colors my world.
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/members...bums19552.html

  5. #5
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    4,910
    A friend brought me a quilt frame - her friend was going to throw it out. I have it in one of the abandoned houses out here - until I can figure out what I want to do with it. Don't even have a clue as to how to put it together.

  6. #6
    Super Member mike'sgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    starke,Florida
    Posts
    2,005
    I have a Q-Snap frame that I use to sandwich and baste my quilts. I have a very bad back and can't bend over a table to baste, so this works for me. I agree with Jan's advice, keep it even when you think you might not want it anymore, you never know when you want it again.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Kwiltr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    East Kootenays, BC
    Posts
    668
    I have a floor frame with the roller system, much like a long armer would use, but made of oak and intended for hand quilting. Now that I have carpel tunnel, I'm making the shift to machine quilting. However, my last quilt in the frame was such a bear to hand quilt, I ended up hand basting the quilt while in the frame, taking it out and machine quilting it on my domestic. I'm going to hang onto it for awhile, as it worked so well for getting the sandwich together square and I haven't tried sandwiching a queen size quilt any other way yet, so may just use it for that in the future.

  8. #8
    Super Member DOTTYMO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    England Alton Towers
    Posts
    6,641
    Blog Entries
    1
    I have one I purchased from second hand shop for 5 . It is a long rectangular one on a home made frame with lockable wheels. It gets used for all sorts. Displays quilts. Hand quilting. But not thought about using itforsandwiching. When I purchased my father said, what's that for ? Only thought hand quilting but I have even put towels on in a spare room for visitors. Keep it and keep inside your house and display your quilts.
    Finished is better than a UFO

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    149
    Blog Entries
    2
    I have the quilt frame my grandfather made for my grandmother. Wouldn't trade it for the world.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Noiseynana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Western Arkansas
    Posts
    631
    Blog Entries
    2
    I use mine to hand quilt . I love it. My husband made me one out of PVC pipe. Works like a charm.
    Stitching is Meditation in Motion

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Southeastern Indiana
    Posts
    364
    I have the frame my dad's neighbor made for my mom out of poplar lumber from the farm I grew up on. It is a work of art and I love it. I do all my hand quilting of big quilts on it. It takes up the whole room so I'm clearing out space in my sewing room to put it up again as I have a large quilt to finish for a friend. I hope it stays in my family. The man's son would like to have it, but I think my kids will keep it. My son is single so I know he won't need it, but my daughter is beginning to get into quilting so maybe she will get started hand quilting when she gets a bigger house to put it up. I can't quilt in a hoop unless it is something small. Then my stitches aren't as good as they are in a frame where I have a lot more control over them.
    Alice the quilter

  12. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    177
    This would be great to put your quilt on to tie. I don't have space to lay a quilt down and with my bad knees can't kneel. Lots of my friends use a couple tables together to lay their quilts on then they have to bend over and reach to the center to tie. This frame would be a great gift.

  13. #13
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,703
    Keep it. You may find several uses for it. I made myself a frame years ago and have used it many times for hand quilting and basting.

  14. #14
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Corpus Christi, Tx.
    Posts
    15,888
    Blog Entries
    3
    You have been blessed. I see no reason why you couldn't use it for sandwiching or tying. Possibly even for displaying. I would contact a bunch of quilting friends just for the heck of it and have an old fashioned quilting bee. Doesn't have to be big. ya'll could work on quilts for donations. Just have a designated hour for a bee.

  15. #15
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    9,757
    If there is no quilt in the frame it is also nice to have it set up in the living room with some quilts hanging off it like a giant quilt rack.
    Anna Quilts

  16. #16
    Super Member Emma S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Roseburg, OR
    Posts
    2,957
    I recently found a frame at a thrift shop for thirty dollars. I used it for sandwiching and Elmers glue basting for the first time recently. The whole process took me about three hours as opposed to over eight hours that is my normal time. It was physically easier, faster and every bit as fool proof as hand basting on a table.

  17. #17
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Central Wisconsin
    Posts
    3,346
    The quilt frame I "inherited" from my MIL consisted of four sticks: narrow boards with holes about a foot apart that are 80 inches and 90 inches long (two of each). They could accommodate about a 76 X 86 quilt. That was a full size quilt in those days. They may have come from the 1800's. The fabric was held on with thumb tacks.

    Then my son made two longer ones (108 inches) with the baseboards from this house when we remodeled. Last year I made two more short ones (48 inches). Now I can stretch out almost any size quilt I care to make.

    These were held together with C-clamps, but I figured out a way to use bolts in the holes in the boards. My friend used to use pegs to put into the holes, but they fell out too many times.
    We support these frames with the edges of two tables with another table in the center to support the quilt (at the town hall), or support each corner on the back of a chair (at home). Here I would put a card table under the center so it doesn't sag as much.

    I have put a sheet on it to use as a design wall, or as a display wall for small quilts and such in a show.

    They've seen a lot of use.
    Last edited by maviskw; 05-14-2013 at 10:55 AM.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  18. #18
    Super Member Jeanette Frantz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,374
    I have a frame my husband built from a kit. He did all the wood work and the way it's made, it rolls the quilt up as you quilt. When he built it, I swore I would never do anything larger than a twin, so that's its capacity, right now. However, it could easily be converted to accommodate a much larger quilt. Because my husband built it before he died, and because it is so convenient (the quilt surface can be tilted to any angle you desire) I treasure it greatly.

    Jeanette Frantz

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Beaverton OR
    Posts
    77
    Blog Entries
    3
    Noiseynana please share some details on the frame our husband made of PVC pipe. Did he make a slit the length of the pipe to fit over a same size PVC and this hold the quilt firmly in place?
    I do have a purchased frame made of the PVC pipe but is so difficult for me to push it over the matching pipe once the quilt is layered. Other than that it makes an excellent frame Also have a small pillow size made of smaller pipe and like it.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    10
    Jan, I have just been gifted a frame similar to this one. Not sure how to attach quilt and how to roll it. Name:  quilting frame.jpg
Views: 192
Size:  68.1 KB

  21. #21
    Power Poster ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    19,178
    I built one like Jan's example but I found that a LQS classroom worked better for me with pinning quilts than this frame ever did. Keep it stored safely and one day you might want to try your hand at doing hand quilting.
    A Good Friend, like an old quilt, is both a Treasure and a Comfort

  22. #22
    Super Member Emma S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Roseburg, OR
    Posts
    2,957
    Mamaduck: I can describe how mine works. First you need to attach strips of fabric to the long sides. Some sturdy fabric like canvas. You can either staple it or make a sleeve that can slips on the bars. Attach the back to the strips on both sides using safety pins or a long running stitch. Then just roll the back on one of the bars until the back is taught. Place the batting on the back putting the excess even on all sides including the side attached to the bar. Using either spray adhesive or glue attach adhere. As you get one section adhered wind the unloaded bar to the next section. Do the same with the top. Remove and quilt. Hope this helps.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.