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Thread: A girl I know wants to buy one of my quilts, EEEEEK!

  1. #1
    Super Member Baren*eh*ked_canadian's Avatar
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    What do I do?

    I posted some pics of my quilts on facebook because a guy at work asked me to, and someone else I know looked at them and wants to buy one from me. Actually she saw a couple she likes but they're not the right size for her bed.
    I wouln't mind making one special for her in her colours, the pattern she chooses, but I have NO CLUE how much to charge!!! I've always made my quilts as gifts ( well, so far, anyway).
    She has a double bed, and I think she likes the jewel box pattern.

  2. #2
    Super Member pittsburgpam's Avatar
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    I have the same question. I've never sold one and a cousin saw one of my almost completed ones and asked if I would sell it to him. I said I would have to think about it. I would have no idea what to charge. I've looked online and the prices are all over the place from a few hundred dollars to thousands.

    I have very vague ideas floating around my head of doing quilting when I retire. I'm trying very hard to be able to retire at 55 and if I could earn a little extra it could be more of a possibility.

  3. #3
    Super Member Kyiav10's Avatar
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    Congrats to both of you!! That says a lot about your quilts!! Pricing is hard for sure, just from what I have been reading on the net.

    Kyia

  4. #4
    Super Member azdesertrat's Avatar
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    my 2 cents worth, most people don't realize the amount of work that goes into one.So don't be shy, start at least 300.00 for a queen/full size ,some people might say that is not enough,but if you want to sell them that is a place to start,and with todays economy they are willing to pay that then go for it

  5. #5
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    wow! how exciteing for you ,,,,, i have no idea but i'm sure someone will help you..... i just wanted to say how neat for you :D

  6. #6
    Super Member Baren*eh*ked_canadian's Avatar
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    Thanks for the advice.
    With my wedding coming up, I'm really trying to save my pennies and make a little extra, you know what I mean?
    My mother has already signed me up for some fairs next summer, and I need to start making some stuff. I'm not in it for the money, I really love doing this stuff, but if I can make some cash along the way, that would be totally awsome!

  7. #7
    Moderator tlrnhi's Avatar
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    Rule of thumb.....charge 3 times what you paid for you materials.
    You can come down a bit on the price, but be forwarned....most people who don't quilt or have a clue about quilting will think you are charging too much. I had a couple quilts in the craft fair I did and the prices were REALLY cheap. The baby quilt I had was priced at $50 and had a lady tell me that it was WAAAY too much money. The other 2 I had were twin/lap size and I had them at $100. People would mutter that it was too much to spend on the quilts.
    I would ask these people what is the maximum they are willing to spend. IF it's an inconcieveable number they come up with, explain to them the "art of quilting". Once they understand, they may pay what you are wanting and then again, they may not.

  8. #8
    Power Poster sandpat's Avatar
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    I recently priced a baby quilt at 100 bucks. It has plenty of applique, pieced blocks and also lots of quilting. I told her if she wants it fine...if she doesn't, thats fine with me too. Frankly, I'd rather donate the quilts than sell them for less than I think they are worth. I love doing it too and am not trying to make a living...thus...I'll give them away before selling them too cheap. Good luck!! :lol:

  9. #9
    Super Member mpspeedy's Avatar
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    Melanie,

    You have asked the question every quilter faces. How much is our work worth? If the person really wants a quilt take them to a store to look at fabric so they know how much it costs. Let them see how expensive batting can be and the difference between them. Show them a price list from a long armer if they want it machine quilted and then tell them your construction of the quilt would start at $10 a square foot for basic piecing or simple applique. Don't be afraid to raise the price for more complicated patterns. As a handquilter for hire I charge $10 a square foot for basic quilting and go up by 2 cent inquirements if the qulting gets elaborate. I also charge at my cost if I supply the batting and backing. I also charge an extra $15 if I do the binding. I usually charge what the original price of the backing and batting would be if I was not able to find a bargin or discount.
    If the person does not supply the fabric or in my case the backing and batting I get a deposit big enough to cover that expense up front. I usually get a $50 deposit if I am supplying the backing and batting. If they decide they don't want the finished quilt the deposit is none refundable and I keep the quilt.

    Just for kicks keep a count of the actual hours you spend making a quilt. It will be an eye opener for you and help you realize how much your time is probably worth.

    Good luck

  10. #10
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
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    WOW What a complement to you and your quilts. Can't help with pricing. Mine are all gifts.

  11. #11
    Senior Member triciasquilts's Avatar
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    I charge from $250 up to around 500 for a queen/king size. But it depends on how much work goes into it. I sold one of my lap size for $200 not too long ago. She was using it as a large wallhanging.

  12. #12
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    what she said

  13. #13
    Senior Member Kara's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpspeedy
    Melanie,

    You have asked the question every quilter faces. How much is our work worth? If the person really wants a quilt take them to a store to look at fabric so they know how much it costs. Let them see how expensive batting can be and the difference between them. Show them a price list from a long armer if they want it machine quilted and then tell them your construction of the quilt would start at $10 a square foot for basic piecing or simple applique. Don't be afraid to raise the price for more complicated patterns. As a handquilter for hire I charge $10 a square foot for basic quilting and go up by 2 cent inquirements if the qulting gets elaborate. I also charge at my cost if I supply the batting and backing. I also charge an extra $15 if I do the binding. I usually charge what the original price of the backing and batting would be if I was not able to find a bargin or discount.
    If the person does not supply the fabric or in my case the backing and batting I get a deposit big enough to cover that expense up front. I usually get a $50 deposit if I am supplying the backing and batting. If they decide they don't want the finished quilt the deposit is none refundable and I keep the quilt.

    Just for kicks keep a count of the actual hours you spend making a quilt. It will be an eye opener for you and help you realize how much your time is probably worth.

    Good luck
    This is all great info. People don't know the time, money, energy that go into a quilt.

    And the actual hours... I FINISHED a quilt for my husband's aunt (some assembly, some quilting) and there were 30 hours logged into that. I asked for something, she gave me $50 more. Said I did a great job, but she knew what went into a quilt.

    And the cost will vary depending on where you get fabric/supplies, too. Craft shops are cheaper than your LQS.

    I really like the "per square foot" costs. People should be able to multiply that up to a pretty good number.

  14. #14
    Super Member Tiffany's Avatar
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    My suggestion, keep track of the hours you put into the quilt, both piecing and quilting it. You'd be amazed at how much time goes into a quilt and those who don't quilt will appreciate knowing! I often keep track of how much time I put into a quilt, especially when doing hand applique and hand quilting, and will add that information on the label on the back of the quilt. I have a quilt that will have about 500 hours into it after all is said and done. My hubby thought I should sell it but because it is a pattern from a published book, I cannot sell it because it has a copyright. You will want to check into copyright laws if you are using an established pattern and if it is out of a book or magazine, read the fine print in the front. Often it will state that the patterns inside are NOT for resale but for personal use only. I think such things are a bit rediculous because most of us are not making these quilts in a production line but it is better to be safe then sorry and read the fine print. If you are creating your own patterns, just ignore this. :wink:
    Piece ~ Tiffany

  15. #15
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    i charged and got $250.00 to do a simple 6" block (in the customer's colors) quilt, twin sized. it was pillowcase style and only tied off.

    it depends what the traffic will bear and how badly the customer wants the item. it's just so hard to know. but don't set the precedent of selling too cheap. you can always come down in price but not up. how little are you willing to make per hour?

  16. #16
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    I'VE NEVER SOLD A QUILT, BUT OUR LOCAL CRAFT SHOP CHARGES 15 CENTS PER SQUARE INCH FOR HAND QUILTING ! ADD THAT TO COST OF MATERIAL---GETS PRICEY!! LIKE EVERYONE ELSE, I WOULD RATHER GIVE THEM AWAY THAN BE INSULTED WITH A BELOW ROCK-BOTTOM OFFER !

  17. #17
    Super Member Sharon M's Avatar
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    the only quilt I have ever sold was to a friend of my husband. It was a raggedy quilt, generous size lap quilt. I only had $30 invested in it. I told him he could buy one from China for $50 to $85 but he said he prefered one that someone he knew had made. I charged $75. Didn't want to sell it to low in case he told anyone......the price of material goes up and I had got a bargain on material for that quilt. But I agree with everyone else most people don't have a clue what material, batting, thread ect costs let alone paying for your time and skill. Always set a price you are comfortable with if they are willing to pay great if not let them buy elsewhere. So many things to factor in, location for one very important thing. I think making quilts is something we just love to do and most of us would rather give them away than to be underpaid and under appreciated!

  18. #18
    Super Member Tiffany's Avatar
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    I've talked to a few of my friends who sell quilts and they would not sell anything except a crib quilt for less than $200. One gal frequently gets $1000 or more for her quilts. I think the problem right now would be the economy. Everything seems to have slowed down and that can affect prices.

    I would NEVER recommend a quilt from China. Have you ever taken a look at the quality? The quilting is horrible and very minimal. :( JMO.

  19. #19
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    Ok... several years ago I made a wall hanging called Los Doches (sp) that was essentially 12 - 8 pointed stars. It was what we now call fussy cut. All hand pieced and hand quilted, Jinny Beyer fabric.. it ended up being 36" x 45".. I had several people offer to buy it. I wasn't sure I wanted to sell it, but I priced it at $250. neither person blinked, but I wound up selling it to the person who lived closest (my now ex-SIL.) I didn't want to worry about checks clearing, mailing, etc. The purple and black Kaleidoscope Star quilt that I posted a pic of is already sold.. a friend I work with asked me what a quilt went for and I told her that story. She said "Ok.. I want that one." so I guess it's sold.. although if it was anyone but her I'd probably charge a bit more. It's a lot of work.

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