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Thread: Has anyone ever used a serger to piece a quilt top?

  1. #26
    Junior Member joyceinoh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rebecca VLQ
    I like to trim off the excess batting and backing with my serger, it compresses the edge nicely so I can finish it. As for serging the whole thing? The cheapie in me says that would take a lot of serger thread, so I don't. But it's well worth the time saved on preparing the edge of the quilt.
    I use my serger for quilting pieces,, I think it makes the seam more secure. As for using more thread, the price of the thread on the cones is much more economical than on the spools. Figure it up once and I think you will find the cost is about the same. You can use 3 threads, I use the 4.
    Only thing with my serger, I wish I had gotten one that would handle heavier material.

  2. #27
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    a friend ALWAYS uses her serger for piecing, never anything else. after quilting it looks fine to me. but she sticks to straight seams.

  3. #28
    Junior Member oldhag's Avatar
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    Yep I've done it and then machine quilted it. Worked great. I only wish I had taken some pictures of it. I would stick to simple piecing and sashing designs. As for bulk, never noticed any and was able to machine quilt over those bulky seams so that's probably why I didn't notice.I wouldn't do this for every quilt but when you need something quick and easy for an emergency gift this is the way to do it.

  4. #29
    quiltilicious's Avatar
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    I made my very first quilt with my serger. It was a Radiant Star king size (from the "Quilt in a Day" series). Amazingly enough, everything lined up properly.

  5. #30
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    That is all my sister in law uses. Actually, when I first started quilting I bought a serger thinking that's what a I needed. Now I hardly ever use it.

  6. #31
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    I made a rather large size piece Rail Fence on the serger about eighteen years ago. It worked fine for that but never felt like using it for another. Sergers were pretty new then and there were patterns around to use on serger. Nothing too complicated. The seams were fine on that and would be on large size blocks.

  7. #32
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    I do have a pattern for a serger quilt somewhere... and when I get home I think I will have another look for it.

    As far as thread goes, I have so much serger thread, that I would welcome anything to use it up!

    My serger seems to have a problem with denim, so using it for quilting would be good, cause it's been sitting for a while now!

    Theresa

  8. #33

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    I have and I have ran into an issue. Too much thread and broken needles. Somehow a serger creates too much material for it to finish nicely. I might have done it wrong but it just didn't feel or look right to me. I do however serge fabric that I sell so that it doesn't unravel or anything between here and the customer. I also don't make a fat quarter in the normal fat quarter size because I serge it. I'm just odd that way.

  9. #34
    Junior Member scarlet14's Avatar
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    I serged my first quilt together---didn't know I wasn't supposed to---it is an Eleanor Burns log cabin---went together pretty quick ---when I took it the local quilt store to buy the backing the owner looked at the square I brought in to match---turned it over and said "ick you serged it" and dropped it like a hot potatoe---I said "yes and that's why I have a serger ---it's to use"---didn't go back till she sold the shop to someone else ---I say what ever turns your crank---have had the quilt on our bed now for about 10 years and it's great---if I do another log cabin type I would use it again---used the 4 thread stitch

  10. #35
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    I have watched some recent Eleneor Burns shows where she used a serger. If she does it, can't be all bad, right????

  11. #36
    Member Glory's Avatar
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    I made a Christmas Throw with my serger. It was simple, with a center block that was embriodered. Kept the quilting simple. It turned out great ! Would only do on simple blocks, but went really fast.

  12. #37
    Senior Member mrsmail's Avatar
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    I love using the serger for putting quilts together. Gives you such a nice clean finished back. Never had a problem with too much bulk or anything like that. It took Grand Prize at the fair the year I entered it.

  13. #38
    Super Member grannypat7925's Avatar
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    I have made this one and it goes together quickly and easily. I didn't notice any extra bulk. Fons and Porter's show today on PBS did a small quilt entirely on serger. Very interesting.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Favorite Fabrics
    I would use a serger for a simple quilt, say one with just "big" squares, that would be tied, and likely to be washed a lot. That way you wouldn't have to worry about the seams fraying away. Anything that would actually be quilted, not tied, would not ravel as readily.
    I agree with you. I use a serger and several ladies from Project linus use them also for larger blocks and strips quilts. I love the nice finish it does. No bulk on larger pattern quilts. It would be hard to use on a bargello etc.

  15. #40
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    Here's a picture of one finished this week. Back and front, no bulk.

    Serger used on large block pattern
    Name:  Attachment-79408.jpe
Views: 108
Size:  36.0 KB

    Front side of serged fabric
    Name:  Attachment-79409.jpe
Views: 121
Size:  38.4 KB

  16. #41
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    When I first got my serger I pieced a quilt. I think it makes seams so neat, did not notice extra bulk. I loved it. Just had my serger tuned up and getting ready to do another one.

  17. #42

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    I use the serger for a lot of quilt tops. Making charity quilts it takes less time. Have better luck matching seams with serger sometimes than with sewing machine. Never noticed bulk in any top. The one, I am making now is first in a while that I am using sewing machine.
    Serger thread can be bought cheap and why have a machine just collecting dust. First one I did was the log cabin. When you serge you can make table toppers in a hurry. :thumbup:

  18. #43
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    Denise,
    The Viking store where I work, we were taught to piece the store sample quilts with a serger and its easy; once you figure out where the 1/4" seam allowance should be.
    Sharon W.
    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseP
    I have wondered about this but never asked. I have two sergers and love them for just about any sewing project. One is industrial that can handle anything and the other is a home machine that can only handle cotton. Has anyone ever serged a quilt together? I am tempted to try it, but afraid I will ruin it or will only realize at the end that I should not have done it.

  19. #44
    Pati- in Phx's Avatar
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    Terry, Sounds like a flat lock stitch. Depending on which side you look at the seam one is a "ladder" and the other is more of a criss-cross type stitch.

    I have done some early quilts by taking panels and serging on straight borders. Several rounds of borders to make a throw size quilt.
    I may have even done a serger "satin stitch" to finish the edges of some of those quilts. I know I quilted them by using decorative stitches over the seams with decorative threads. the last I saw of some of those they were beginning to look well used. But they have held up for almost 10 years.

    Serging would be a good way to do a "casual" type quilt pattern, not a lot of intricate piecing, fairly large pieces, that is to be used as a "summer quilt". Summer quilts don't usually have batting and are just tacked to a backing. Often they are just "pillowcased" and turned to back them. Simple stitching helps hold the back and top together.

    Pati, in Phx


    Quote Originally Posted by Terryl
    I wish I could remember which stitch we used when I made my quilt on the serger, the class I took was for a wall hanging, but me, being me, I made a kingsized quilt, just tripled the pattern we were using, anyway seems to me we serged the fabric wrong sides together, then when we opened the blocks out they were flat but you could see the stitches, sort of like decorative stitches. I didn't notice any extra bulk when it was quilted. I'm in the process of moving now so once we get settled (if I don't forget) maybe I'll take the quilt out and see if I can identify which stitch we used.

  20. #45
    Pati- in Phx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    Come to think of it, I think I've seen blue jeans quilts where the pieces were serged wrong sides together with decorative red thread. The red seams were pretty. The quilt didn't need a backing fabric, so it was lighter than most blue jeans quilts, and of course less work to make because no quilting.

    I will have to see if I can find a picture online.
    Many, many years ago Kaye Wood did several TV shows using the serger. She would do patchwork with the seams on the outside, serged with decorative thread. If the seams are wide you can treat them like tucks and stitch them down in alternating directions and so on. It is a great way to add some additional color or bling (by using metallic or lame type threads in your loopers) to a project.
    A lot of those early projects were used as parts of clothing, but they would also be great as accents or textured pieces in quilts and bags.

    Pati, in Phx

  21. #46
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    Eleanor Burns has a quilt done on the serger
    Renda

  22. #47
    Member Lou Lou's Avatar
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    Today I saw a qullt top all pieced with the serger, the seams were all flat and it really looked nice. This was at a very nice shop.

  23. #48
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseP
    I have wondered about this but never asked. I have two sergers and love them for just about any sewing project. One is industrial that can handle anything and the other is a home machine that can only handle cotton. Has anyone ever serged a quilt together? I am tempted to try it, but afraid I will ruin it or will only realize at the end that I should not have done it.
    I did a really pretty prayer quilt for my church quilting group. I was great .... that is til one of the women stretched it so the serging showed and then laughed.

    Now I would only serge if I completely finish the quilt. I still prefer the sewing machine to the serger for piecing.

    ali

  24. #49
    Senior Member schwanton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseP
    I have wondered about this but never asked. I have two sergers and love them for just about any sewing project. One is industrial that can handle anything and the other is a home machine that can only handle cotton. Has anyone ever serged a quilt together? I am tempted to try it, but afraid I will ruin it or will only realize at the end that I should not have done it.
    I have not done it myself, but this morning on Fons and Porter, a guest not only pieced the quilt with a serger, she quilted it. Never saw anything like it.

  25. #50
    Super Member QuiltNama's Avatar
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    I have made many serger quilts. Usually make bigger blocks and have never had any problems quilting them on my HQ midarm. I also serge my fabric edges before washing to keep down the strings. Every year my guild gets together and we make the 6 hour quilts for the local shelters.

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