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Thread: Have you ever put your thread in the freezer?

  1. #1
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    Have you ever put your thread in the freezer?

    I read in my manual that if I had problems with thread breakage, it could be that my thread had dried out. It stated that you can put your thread in the freezer and it will rehydrate it and make it strong again and you will have less breakage. Have any of you ever put your thread in the freezer? If so, what kind of results have you had with it afterward? Did it help?
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    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    no but i have spritzed mine with water before. moisture is supposed to help. i also use some liquid thread helper at times.

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    Senior Member kristakz's Avatar
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    Never tried it, but I was just given that suggestion by my long arm dealer last week, when I complained about thread breakage. Haven't tried it yet.

  4. #4
    Super Member franc36's Avatar
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    I have never put thread in my freezer; but I put embroidery thread in the refrigerator overnight. My embroidery thread is 8 years old and certain colors tend to break easily. Putting the thread in the refrigerator has worked for me. I have not had trouble with my quilting or sewing thread so have never refrigerated them.

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    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Okay, three things I want to say here.

    1. I have a very experienced friend who was having trouble with a thread that was constantly breaking. She finally called the thread manufacturer who instructed her to place the thread in the freezer overnight. She did and it worked great after that. Nobody knows why.

    2. Freezers do not rehydrate anything, especially if they are "frost free" - they do the opposite! A frost free freezer removes moisture from the air inside the freezer. This prevents it from collecting on surfaces inside the freezer and turning into frost. It also removes moisture from your food, which is the cause of freezer burn.

    3. Sharon Schamber will actually dip a cone of thread into white mineral oil, let it drain on a paper towel, then use it in her machine. She agrees with the point that sometimes thread gets dried out and needs to be re-moisturized. This topic has been discussed on this board before, and there will be nay-sayers who will refuse to try this because they're afraid of getting oil on the quilt. I've never seen any oil spots on any of the award-winning quilts that Sharon makes.

    My point is it can't hurt to try. Try the thread in the freezer; if it works, great! Try the oil on the thread, and if you're nervous about oil stains, then put some of the thread on a bobbin, oil it, and try it out on scraps.

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    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I am baffled that putting thread in the freezer is effective for the long term. I get that freezing helps to redistribute the moisture already in the thread. But that is only working with the moisture avaiable ... so how is this good for getting the moisture level back to when it was purchased?!! This doesn't seem like all that good of a solution for longterm life of the thread in a quilt.

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    Junior Member Joy.lynn's Avatar
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    "3. Sharon Schamber will actually dip a cone of thread into white mineral oil, let it drain on a paper towel, then use it in her machine. She agrees with the point that sometimes thread gets dried out and needs to be re-moisturized. This topic has been discussed on this board before, and there will be nay-sayers who will refuse to try this because they're afraid of getting oil on the quilt. I've never seen any oil spots on any of the award-winning quilts that Sharon makes."

    Does anyone know if "white" mineral oil is the same as "clear" mineral oil? I have never seen the white stuff.

  8. #8
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joy.lynn View Post
    Does anyone know if "white" mineral oil is the same as "clear" mineral oil? I have never seen the white stuff.
    I believe they call it "white" because it is clear, as opposed to having a yellowish or brownish tint. Your best bet is to look for "pharmaceutical" grade mineral oil, which is a higher grade than food grade mineral oil, and is required to be free of all impurities. Some food grade mineral oils have lubricants and anti-wear additives, because they're approved for use on food processing machines.

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    Super Member DOTTYMO's Avatar
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    Okay, it has just taken me five minutes to be able to type a reply.my iPad keys were frozen!,,,
    I was going to say I put a drop of thread oil on needle tip and in my bobbin, around a and on thread and finally a few drops on my thread and massage in gently and leave to make a drink before sewing. Never had trouble in any way.
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    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lori S View Post
    I am baffled that putting thread in the freezer is effective for the long term. I get that freezing helps to redistribute the moisture already in the thread. But that is only working with the moisture avaiable ... so how is this good for getting the moisture level back to when it was purchased?!! This doesn't seem like all that good of a solution for longterm life of the thread in a quilt.

    I'm supposing that after a quilt is made that normal washing keeps the thread the way it is supposed to be. But, if a quilt or any fabric is not stored right, it can dry rot.
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    Yes, I have put my thread in the freezer. It works. The thread becomes dry and putting the thread in the freezer rehydrates it. You might want to give it a try.

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    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    I'm going to try it. It sounds reasonable. I just wondered if anyone had actually done it. Thanks!! Now, I just gotta make room.
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    Senior Member Michellesews's Avatar
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    I've used Sewers Helper, which is Silicone...but I cannot say it helps that much. Maybe I will try the mineral oil next time.
    Michelle Guadarrama

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    Well my son had me put a hard drive for my computer in the freezer so that I could get info off of it and we put paintbrushes in the freezer to keep them from drying out in between painting so why not thread.
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    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    I have not done this, but I have heard it before. I guess it would not hurt to try it!

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    I have put my thread in the freezer and found that it did indeed help with breakage.

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    Wow!!! What a great tip! When my thread breaks, I throw it away because I assume it has dry-rotted.

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    Super Member nhweaver's Avatar
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    Old cotton Thread does dry rot - is the breakage being discussed new cotton thread? I don't think I would want to sew with "reconstituted" thread - we put too much work into a quilt. I wouldn't want to have my seams come apart on a quilt that only gets displayed, and rarely would find itself washed and dried.
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    Senior Member carolstickelmaier's Avatar
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    I too have put the thread in the freezer. It did seem to help. I had assumed it was due to the sweating we see when we take things out of the freezer that rehydrated it. Never heard of the white mineral oil. Worth a try if you are going to pitch it out anyway....Just use on practice fabric first to check it out.

  20. #20
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Are you using the right needle for that particular thread? Incorrect needles are the most common cause of thread breakage, not dryness...especially if your thread passes the tug test, meaning it does not break when you pull on it.
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    Junior Member DianaSwi's Avatar
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    Yes I have once and it worked beautifully..freezer over night!!
    Diana
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    Quote Originally Posted by DOTTYMO View Post
    Okay, it has just taken me five minutes to be able to type a reply.my iPad keys were frozen!,,,
    I was going to say I put a drop of thread oil on needle tip and in my bobbin, around a and on thread and finally a few drops on my thread and massage in gently and leave to make a drink before sewing. Never had trouble in any way.
    The " ...leave to make a drink." statement and then never have any trouble part make me wonder what is in that drink? Some drinks go down easier than others and help to decrease tension and stress. Could it be it was the DRINK and not the oil that was helpful? LOL

  23. #23
    Senior Member MamaHen's Avatar
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    If that thread needs to be reconstitued with oil or frozen to use, why won't it just get dried out and break again. I'm of the opinion that the thread must be old and I would rather throw it away than take the chance of it breaking again. If I have to do the above mentioned in order to use the thread, I'd find another brand. That's just me.

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    I had some really old thread and it kept breaking so I tried this and it didn't do a thing. So I bought the same type of thread new and had the same issue. I then changed they size and type of needle and no more problems.
    Judy

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michellesews View Post
    I've used Sewers Helper, which is Silicone...but I cannot say it helps that much. Maybe I will try the mineral oil next time.
    this is not recommended for a lot of newer computerized machines so I won't use it.
    Judy

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