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Thread: Have you had this problem?

  1. #26
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    Call the customer service number. They are extremely nice and helpful. I have dealt with them a few times and they address your question and even address a couple others that many people call in about. Very pleasant experience!
    Bobbi
    Quilting happily in Tennessee!


  2. #27
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    I too bought a Brother cs6000i from Wal-Mart and after about 1 1/2 years the timing went out. Long story short it (according to Brother dealer) would continue to do this. Was too expensive to keep repairing so gave up on it. I did buy a new Brother from a different dealer and its exact same machine but have never had any problems with it yet. I still use my old trusty Singer for most of my sewing but like to switch off to the Brother and give "Betsy" a rest.
    Kathy Osterby

  3. #28
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    I have 3 Brothers and they all work fine. The oldest one is 17 years old and still runs fine. Maybe you just got a lemon.
    ~Charlotte~
    This is the day that the Lord hath made, we will rejoice and be glad in it.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee in Richmond View Post
    Several months ago I bought an inexpensive Brother machine to replace my dying old Pfaff. It took me a while to like the new one at all, but it turned out the upper tension inside the machine is off, so compensating for that helped. The only problem I cannot seem to get over is the bobbin take-up.

    A technician at my LQS showed me what the bobbin area should look like, how the thread end should cross over the inserted bobbin and then come up thru the plate. (Please forgive if these are not the right words.) When I need to insert a new bobbin I often have to take it back out and try over and over again, sometimes a dozen times, before it [the thread end] stays in the right place long enough to sew. And then it sometimes slips "out" in the middle of a seam, at which point it begins that looping nonsense on the underside.

    Long, long story to this point, but the question is: Have you had this problem, and have you found a "cure"?
    The thread has to sort of 'click' into the tension guide in the bobbin. It isn't enough to just place it in right side up, you need to make sure it slips under the little 'finger looking' guide and has tension on it when you pull the thread. I'm not sure which Brother you are using but that's sort of a 'generic' explanation if that helps at all.

  5. #30
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    I too have a Brother/Laura Ashley NX2000 machine (which I don't consider inexpensive) and have had issues with the bobbin/bobbin case. I've had the machine 14 months and am on my third bobbin case (1st came with machine and somehow it got a broken hook - don't know how I did that; 2nd got burrs on the outer edge - probably from unnoticed bent needle since there were needle scars on the top of the case - says my tech.)
    I used a walking foot to quilt a lap size with a cotton batting. The tech was quite convinced that I force-fed through the feed dogs.
    Been sewing for 50 years with Singer/Viking/Elna and now Brother/Laura Ashley, Janome embroidery, and Elna serger so I'm not new to the rodeo but sure am new to replacing bobbin cases!

  6. #31
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    My tech has been near-militant about using Brother bobbins. Singer's look same but are slightly curved.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by IBQLTN View Post
    The thread has to sort of 'click' into the tension guide in the bobbin. It isn't enough to just place it in right side up, you need to make sure it slips under the little 'finger looking' guide and has tension on it when you pull the thread. I'm not sure which Brother you are using but that's sort of a 'generic' explanation if that helps at all.
    I just got back from taking my machine to a Brother technician at the LQS, and you are exactly right. My instructions do not say to HOLD THE BOBBIN DOWN WITH YOUR THUMB WHILE PULLING THE THREAD AROUND TOWARD THE CUTTER. I did not know there was a little hook hidden under there. I hopefully will now be able to settle down and sew, sew, sew. Thanks to all of you who sent suggestions.

  8. #33
    Super Member butterflies5518's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sananddandy View Post
    Looking at your picture, the bobbin loads like mine. You do not have to pull the bobbin thread to the top. You just wrap it around the way the directions show, with the thread going the correct direction and cut it at the end with the built in cutter. I use a starter piece to eliminate the bunching of the thread when I begin sewing.
    Looks like mine as well - pull the thread to the left using the arch as a guide (should slip right in there so you don't see it anymore but are still holding the tail) until it is close to the front edge and the auto cutter will trim it perfectly.
    Quilting makes me happy!..

  9. #34
    Super Member Grace MooreLinker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee in Richmond View Post
    Several months ago I bought an inexpensive Brother machine to replace my dying old Pfaff. It took me a while to like the new one at all, but it turned out the upper tension inside the machine is off, so compensating for that helped. The only problem I cannot seem to get over is the bobbin take-up.

    A technician at my LQS showed me what the bobbin area should look like, how the thread end should cross over the inserted bobbin and then come up thru the plate. (Please forgive if these are not the right words.) When I need to insert a new bobbin I often have to take it back out and try over and over again, sometimes a dozen times, before it [the thread end] stays in the right place long enough to sew. And then it sometimes slips "out" in the middle of a seam, at which point it begins that looping nonsense on the underside.

    Long, long story to this point, but the question is: Have you had this problem, and have you found a "cure"?
    My advise is take it back,sounds like it has something not right about the whole set up . Brothers are not usually that big or many problems.
    Freedom is costly and quilting keeps us busy...

  10. #35
    Super Member margecam52's Avatar
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    I think you need to take that machine to a different tech. How can the upper tension be off without the lower being off? Makes no sense.
    I bought my Brother embroidery machine at Walmart, also my Singer 2662. I have not had a problem with either one...other than I messed up the brother twice by not reading the instructions & using the proper bobbin thread.

    On your brother machine (what model is it?)...is it a drop in bobbin? I have the SE270D (since replaced with a PE something)...The bobbin thread has to fit into a little groove before wraping and being cut to the left of the bobbin area. I put a finger on the bobbin then pull the thread through the little metal lip (it has to go all the way) and then I wrap through the left side and cutter.
    If the needle picks up the thread, but the bobbin does not stay threaded...it's in time...if it were out of time, the needle will not pull up the thread.
    Did your LQS offer a different machine? Sorry to be skeptical, but what you are saying does not compute to me. I've had dozens and dozens of machines over the years (we got them at auctions and sold them in our used merchandise store)...cleaned and timed them. If the LQS services a machine, that should include timing. Do check that the thread is the right weight also...I was using 50 wt & my bobbin is factory set at 60wt as the thickest it will take. You want a bobbin weight thread (brother makes a really strong one), or bottom line thread...but do make sure to get it all the way under that little metal lip.


    Quote Originally Posted by Lee in Richmond View Post
    Several months ago I bought an inexpensive Brother machine to replace my dying old Pfaff. It took me a while to like the new one at all, but it turned out the upper tension inside the machine is off, so compensating for that helped. The only problem I cannot seem to get over is the bobbin take-up.

    A technician at my LQS showed me what the bobbin area should look like, how the thread end should cross over the inserted bobbin and then come up thru the plate. (Please forgive if these are not the right words.) When I need to insert a new bobbin I often have to take it back out and try over and over again, sometimes a dozen times, before it [the thread end] stays in the right place long enough to sew. And then it sometimes slips "out" in the middle of a seam, at which point it begins that looping nonsense on the underside.

    Long, long story to this point, but the question is: Have you had this problem, and have you found a "cure"?
    Marge Campbell
    TL18LS/Qbot automated quilter
    http://www.Lmcampbel.com

  11. #36
    Super Member margecam52's Avatar
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    See the drawing to the left? It shows the finer on the bobbin...the thread is running counter clockwise, and is brought back to the front and that is (3) where you need to hold the bobbin and make sure the thread "clicks" under that metal bit on the bobbin case..before you run it through the gray plastic cutter. Also, you need to not bypass that cutter...that gives the correct amount of thread needed for the needle to pull it up.
    If when you tug...the thread breaks, you will have to try again, and possibly use a stronger (not thicker) thread. That is where you want a 60wt thread. My Brother threads the same way. And again...if the upper tension is off...then loosen the upper/or tighten the upper. Mine is never perfect either...on the tension, move the dial...or find a dealer who works on machines but does not sell the new ones.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lee in Richmond View Post
    I got a pretty decent picture of the CORRECT way this should look, and hope I can upload it. This machine has a drop-in bobbin with a very primitive (simple) laying down of the tail. My issue seems to be when the needle & top thread come down to grab it, do they grab it right. (The Tech. at the store did say this was related to the top tension, so maybe I will have to spend the $ to get that fixed.) I was always taught to have both threads "up" before starting to sew, so I pull the wheel toward me to draw the bobbin thread up, before beginning.
    Marge Campbell
    TL18LS/Qbot automated quilter
    http://www.Lmcampbel.com

  12. #37
    Super Member margecam52's Avatar
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    If you got it on the internet...there is no warranty, unless you bought it from brother.
    Have it cleaned and timed...and do make sure to read the manual.
    Marge Campbell
    TL18LS/Qbot automated quilter
    http://www.Lmcampbel.com

  13. #38
    Super Member katesnanna's Avatar
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    I have Janome machines but the bobbins drop in the same way as your pic shows But they do need to be put in a certain way. I was taught when I got my first Janome to hold the bobbin up and the thread should come off so it looks like the letter"P". I know I put it in the wrong way once(don't know how) and ended up with spaghetti on the back of my work. Don't know if this will help but thought I'd mention it.

  14. #39
    Senior Member QuiltingCrazie's Avatar
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    I have a brother too that loads like that. Never had an issue....you dont pull up the bobbin thread you just start sewing. I have made many quilts if your worried about not having a tail don't. Now mine doesn't bunch thread either at the beginning. Do not let people tell you you need an expensive machine. My first brother from Walmart is 15 years old and still works but I wanted more stitches and I'm a daily sewer. My second one I got 8 months ago and perfect still. It took me a minute to get used to the fact you dont have a tail when you first put the bobbin in. I just go slow. Happy Quilting
    *Rachel*

  15. #40
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    I don't know if I can explain this.Do you have the bobbin in with the thread comming off in the right direction?On my machines it should unwind clockwise.Is that true on your machine?It makes a huge difference.My old singers would still sew if it was wrong,but not for a real long time.When it starts acting up,flip the bobbin over and see if that makes a difference.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by sherryl1 View Post
    I don't know if I can explain this.Do you have the bobbin in with the thread comming off in the right direction?On my machines it should unwind clockwise.Is that true on your machine?It makes a huge difference.My old singers would still sew if it was wrong,but not for a real long time.When it starts acting up,flip the bobbin over and see if that makes a difference.
    My bobbin was inserted correctly; my problem was that I didn't know there was a tiny hook hiding inside, and because I wasn't putting tension on the thread as I curved around toward the cutter, it wasn't catching on that hook. She said to hold down the bobbin and pull the thread a bit, and that seems to have cured the whole issue (at least in the hour I've gotten to sew since then). It even seems to have solved what I thought was an upper tension problem, too!

  17. #42
    Super Member JeanieG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee in Richmond View Post
    I got a pretty decent picture of the CORRECT way this should look, and hope I can upload it. This machine has a drop-in bobbin with a very primitive (simple) laying down of the tail. My issue seems to be when the needle & top thread come down to grab it, do they grab it right. (The Tech. at the store did say this was related to the top tension, so maybe I will have to spend the $ to get that fixed.) I was always taught to have both threads "up" before starting to sew, so I pull the wheel toward me to draw the bobbin thread up, before beginning.
    I have that same bobbin on my Brother SQ-9000, which is 2 years old. You do NOT have to draw it up before sewing. Just wrap that thread around that loop on the left and cut it off. When you start sewing it will automatically come up and sew beautifully. Maybe the problem is that you are trying to pull it up, as I use to have to do on my old Singer 503.
    "You have enough quilts made when your soul is filled, your creativity satisfied and your fingers just won't work anymore."

  18. #43
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    I have the same machine. Lots of times I put the thread thru the slot several times before it would catch. But I've had several years of good sewing with the Brother cs600i. I did find that if I sew very fast, the upper thread slipped out of the take-up bar and everything would ball up underneath. When I made sure the thread was back in the slot of the take-up bar, it worked fine.

  19. #44
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee in Richmond View Post
    Several months ago I bought an inexpensive Brother machine to replace my dying old Pfaff. It took me a while to like the new one at all, but it turned out the upper tension inside the machine is off, so compensating for that helped. The only problem I cannot seem to get over is the bobbin take-up.

    A technician at my LQS showed me what the bobbin area should look like, how the thread end should cross over the inserted bobbin and then come up thru the plate. (Please forgive if these are not the right words.) When I need to insert a new bobbin I often have to take it back out and try over and over again, sometimes a dozen times, before it [the thread end] stays in the right place long enough to sew. And then it sometimes slips "out" in the middle of a seam, at which point it begins that looping nonsense on the underside.

    Long, long story to this point, but the question is: Have you had this problem, and have you found a "cure"?
    I'm sewing on a cheap Brother and I have noticed that it takes a little more effort to make the bobbin case SNAP into place, but other than that--------no problem
    Bad Spellers of the World
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