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Thread: Have you tried the fusible batting?

  1. #26
    Super Member Sierra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tezell0801 View Post
    So it is only fusible on one side? hummm, I will try it for some placemats I intend to make and see from there.
    You can get it one sided or two sided fusible. I use it all the time. Smooth it out, give it some time to relax, put your fabric on it and, starting from the center, smooth it with your hands until it is wrinkle free. I pin every foot or 18" to make sure I can't shift the quilt fabric. The adhesive is slightly scratchy and tends to stay where you put it. Now time for dry heat pressing (always starting with the center). Usually I start with only doing the center square yard or so and then resmooth it with my hands and then do a foot around that. It depends on how relaxed the fabric is; sometimes I press the really hard-to-deal with fabric (top or backing) before putting it onto the fusible batting. When the back is done (I always do it first) I do the same process with the front (smooth, pin a few pins, iron with dry heat). Don't press longer than the instructions tell you or it will be hard to reposition, should you find a wrinkle.

    I turn it over and check the back side again, but it rarely (anymore) has a wrinkle (thanks to all that smoothing, which by the way, feels downright theraputic to my fabric loving soul!) When both sides pass my personal quilt police criteria I iron with steam. Using only heat can be unironed by simply reironing and running your hand under that area and lift the fabric free (you have to wait a pinch to let the extreme heat to disapate so you don't burn your hands) and then reposition and reiron. Once you use steam it can be removed using steam again, but it is harder and some of the adhesive gets lost. Follow the directions for how close you need to quilt. It varies, just like different regular battings do.

    I never intend to buy regular batting again. If I need it for something specific I still have plenty left. I have used cheaper and like it fine. I quilt pretty constantly and fusible saves me a huge amount of effort and time, w/o costing me any lots of time and effort to get the sandwich together. I refuse to use sprays that have as many warnings on them as quilt sprays do! Our earth doesn't need it either.

  2. #27
    Super Member mjsylvstr's Avatar
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    I love it....I have used it on mini mug rugs to doing good sized lap quilts.( don't do large quilts anymore) and I wouldn't use anything different now.

    I buy Hobbs through the Connecting Thread when they have it on sale, usually at 30% off....can't beat the bargain.

  3. #28
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    I used it when I was first quilting things with my home machine. It helped me focus on the quilting rather than moving around with pins.

  4. #29
    Senior Member ghquilter53's Avatar
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    I don't remember the brand I used but I didn't like it. It didn't hold the fabric in place for me. I like the basting spray for up to lapsize quilts and have to turn the quilt over before quilting to make sure everything is smooth on the back as well.

  5. #30
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltjoey View Post
    Have used both but prefer spray. It's not the best for people with breathing problems and should be used in a well-ventilated area...
    And also a mask that covers your nose and mouth...please. No matter what the label says, do everything you can to protect your airways.
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  6. #31
    Super Member Lyncat's Avatar
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    It's great for purses!

  7. #32
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    I looked at Joannes yesterday but they did not have any in stock. I will order some from Connecting Threads and give it a try. I really do not like the basting part of quilting so much, maybe this will be my thing.

  8. #33
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
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    Fusible batting does not have the softness of a regular quilt batt, but is perfect for smaller projects like wallhanging, placemats and bags.

  9. #34
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    I found in using fusible batting that it shrunk when I applied steam and caused pillow tops to wrinkle and so I reheated and removed it. I now preshrink it holding the steam iron above it. One brand that does not adhere is June Tailor's. Several quilting friends and I used it and all had the same experience.

  10. #35
    Junior Member catsnchina's Avatar
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    Yes, love it for totes, handbags, place mats and other small projects.
    CMC

  11. #36
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MimiBug123 View Post
    It's okay but I still prefer Elmer's glue!
    I've used both the fusible (for crib quilts and smaller projects) and like it ok--still pin baste but just not as closely. I have a used the spray baste and like the convenience but really don't like asphixiation issue! So that limits when/where I can use it. I have a question about the Elmer's school glue--is it only the washable WHITE or can you use the washable GEL? And has anyone tried mixing it with water in a spray bottle (obviously would have to take the sprayer out each time and wash out so it didn't clog)? I'd like the spray convenience but with something much less toxic. Feedback appreicated!

  12. #37
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    I use it for small projects and I like it a lot....

  13. #38
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    I use the fusible batting all the time for making totes and bags, it gives a sturdier bag than regular batting. I just use it for bags, totes and sometimes placemats and table runners as its' slightly more expensive than regular batting even when I buy it on sale. I tried regular batting once when making a bag and didn't get the same results, the fusible gave me a more substantial bag that holds it's shape very well.

  14. #39
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    i tried using this on a large quilt-hated it..it was difficult for me to work with and get it smooth and i did not like the "tacky" feel of it..ended up using it on individual blocks rather than the full quilt top..even then, i found it disappointing.

  15. #40
    Super Member JoanneS's Avatar
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    Ooohh - I would love it if we could spray Elmers washable glue. I hope somebody tries it before I finish my next top, because I don't want to be the guinea pig!

  16. #41
    Senior Member csharp's Avatar
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    I just finished a queen size quilt with the fusible on both sides. Used the queen bed to lay it all out and ironed (pressed) it down starting with just the batting and the back on top...then flipped and added the quilt top and pressed again starting in the middle and smoothing out. Pinned all the edges when finished and never had any problem with it. Big project and I don't know if I'll do a queen again, but saved a lot of frustration to get it sandwiched this way. Hobby Lobby always has the fusible.
    with a passion for quilting and vintage machines..Singers: 99, 4 featherweights, Redeye 66, Lotus 66, Phoenix 27, 15-91, 301A
    Colleen S.

  17. #42
    Super Member lizzy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tashana View Post
    I tried the fusible batting, and it was pretty good. But I still like basting with Elmer's School glue. I always have the glue and the batting so no need for me to go out and buy something else. But, if you do not like the Elmer's method, I believe the fusible batting is the next best thing.
    I would like to try the school glue for basting a full size quilt. Do you have any tips for me. How do you apply, dots, lines ? Do you allow it to dry thoroughly before quilting? Thanks for your help.
    Lizzy in La.

  18. #43
    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
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    I have use it for purses and place mats and it is fine. I have not used it on a quilt. I use basting spray most of the time.
    Suzanne
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  19. #44
    Super Member Butterflyblue's Avatar
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    I used a fusible (Hobbs, I think) for a baby quilt, and I wasn't happy with it. I had to stop and re-iron it down in places while I was quilting. I used it on a couple of smaller projects (table topper, Christmas stocking), though, and it was great for them.

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by nygal View Post
    I must have been living in a cave some place...I've never heard of fusible batting!!
    How funny I was about to say the same thing. I've never heard of it. I imagine it costs a pretty penny.

  21. #46
    Junior Member Mimiqwerty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltingshorttimer View Post
    I've used both the fusible (for crib quilts and smaller projects) and like it ok--still pin baste but just not as closely. I have a used the spray baste and like the convenience but really don't like asphixiation issue! So that limits when/where I can use it. I have a question about the Elmer's school glue--is it only the washable WHITE or can you use the washable GEL? And has anyone tried mixing it with water in a spray bottle (obviously would have to take the sprayer out each time and wash out so it didn't clog)? I'd like the spray convenience but with something much less toxic. Feedback appreicated!
    I've used the white Elmer's school glue as well as the clear gel and the blue gel. All work equally well. I've even tried an off-brand from Walmart (a white school glue that cost 34 cents for four ounces) and had very good results. My quilt tops and backs were smooth and wrinkle free. And no worries about breathing toxic fumes. I haven't tried it diluted in a spray bottle. Anyone have any experience with that?

  22. #47
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by My time View Post
    How funny I was about to say the same thing. I've never heard of it. I imagine it costs a pretty penny.
    It's not fun if you're crawling around on the floor fusing a queen size. My knees are too old for that. But, if you have a basting table or if you're working on smaller pieces - wallhanging, miniatures, purses, crib or lap quilts - it's really great stuff!

    It's not terribly expensive - I wait until Connecting Threads puts it on sale - I think it's 30 or 40% off - then I stock up and shipping is free.

  23. #48
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    I've used the fusible batting from walmart - a thin bat - on tops that are a bit wonky. I 'iron them into submission' - also known as straightening them out a bit. Seems to work fine for that. Have only done that on baby size quilts. I suspect it wouldn't work too well on larger quilts.

  24. #49
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    Used Elmer's glue for the first time the other day and it was fantastic! I'll be using it again. I'm glad I decided to give it a try!

  25. #50
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    How do you baste the 3 layers together with Elmer's? If it has been posted I missed it as I can't be on every day.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tashana View Post
    I tried the fusible batting, and it was pretty good. But I still like basting with Elmer's School glue. I always have the glue and the batting so no need for me to go out and buy something else. But, if you do not like the Elmer's method, I believe the fusible batting is the next best thing.

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