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Thread: Help.....how do make "thick" quilt

  1. #26
    Senior Member chaskaquilter's Avatar
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    My daughter requested a thicker and heavier quilt that would not slid off the bed, so I used two quilters dream batts and tied it. That quilt was so heavy to move around when I was tying it, but she loves it. Still, it is not as thick as the comforter your daughter has in mind.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cylithria View Post
    For a similair request from my "neice", I used an extremely thin, featherweight batting and instead of making a completed quilt, I actually made the lightweight quilt into a Duvet Cover. (The backing of the quilt top becomes the fabric pocket for the duvet.) Quilted, Super "thick" once the Quilted Duvet Cover was in place on her duvet, and smiles for all.

    Good luck with whatever you work out. I'm sure your daughter will love it.

    I have done this for a down comforter...it is great...they still get a SUMMER quilt!

  3. #28
    Senior Member leighway's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenheron View Post
    H-m-m-m-m. I recently wanted to make a quilt like your daughter requested--I used a thrift store comfort for the filling and tied the layers with buttons and perle cotton. The comfort was already stitched so the tying was as much decorative as useful. Yes, it's a comforter but with a pieced top.

    If you want the quilted look, layer your top with a thin batt and backing and quilt the three layers. Use the resulting quilt as the top layer of an "envelope" or casing with your choice of an additional backing. You would only need to bind one edge--the other three would be sewn to the second back, right sides together and the result turned right-side-out. Insert a comfort. Button or velcro or tie closed. So easy to wash if the comfort is removable. With the batt and lining, the comfort shouldn't show through. Voila! A nice, thick quilt of the kind your daughter desires.
    This is very good thinking on both methods!! It's like having a duvet with texture that doesn't shift and twist. Love it!

  4. #29
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    Is she wanting it thick for the warm or the look , cause we all know thats quilts are very nice and warm
    mary

  5. #30
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    I tried doubling hi-loft poly batting on a quilt once but never again. I couldn't get the frame to hold it very well since it was so thick. I have the pvc frame, works well with every thing else. well, you see I'm very new to quilting! I tied it and it was still hard for me. good luck with yours.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patquiltz View Post
    There is a distinct difference between quilts and comforters. Quilts are quilted and comforters are tied, which is one reason why they are thicker.
    None of the comforters I've bought are tied. They are all quilted. All of them use a grid pattern, generally 12" squares (one is off set so it forms diamonds).

    I actually took apart a comforter that was wearing out, and it's batting was pretty much like every poly-batt I've ever used.

    However, if someone told me they wanted something like a store-bought comforter, I'd suggest they buy a store bought comforter, and if they wanted a quilt from me (and I wanted to make one for them), I'd make them a throw.

  7. #32
    Power Poster ann clare's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cylithria View Post
    For a similair request from my "neice", I used an extremely thin, featherweight batting and instead of making a completed quilt, I actually made the lightweight quilt into a Duvet Cover. (The backing of the quilt top becomes the fabric pocket for the duvet.) Quilted, Super "thick" once the Quilted Duvet Cover was in place on her duvet, and smiles for all.

    Good luck with whatever you work out. I'm sure your daughter will love it.
    Exactly what I was thinking.
    What I make with my hands, I give with my heart.

  8. #33
    Super Member Sweeterthanwine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenheron View Post
    H-m-m-m-m. I recently wanted to make a quilt like your daughter requested--I used a thrift store comfort for the filling and tied the layers with buttons and perle cotton. The comfort was already stitched so the tying was as much decorative as useful. Yes, it's a comforter but with a pieced top.

    If you want the quilted look, layer your top with a thin batt and backing and quilt the three layers. Use the resulting quilt as the top layer of an "envelope" or casing with your choice of an additional backing. You would only need to bind one edge--the other three would be sewn to the second back, right sides together and the result turned right-side-out. Insert a comfort. Button or velcro or tie closed. So easy to wash if the comfort is removable. With the batt and lining, the comfort shouldn't show through. Voila! A nice, thick quilt of the kind your daughter desires.
    I like the idea of putting a thrift store comforter in the middle and tying it together. Have to keep this in my mind for future reference.

  9. #34
    Senior Member Christine27's Avatar
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    I've been using a lot of high and extra high loft poly batting. It was challenging on the regular machine but I didn't have too much trouble on the longarm. Of course, I'm new to longarming, so I still don't know the rules of what I can and can't do.

  10. #35
    Super Member CAS49OR's Avatar
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    I'm so thankful for this thread! I was going to attempt to do the high loft poly batt. I like the idea of just making an envelope of the quilt and backing and inserting the duvet. I think I could even make a duvet with some muslin and bar tack the poly in it.
    :-)
    CAS

  11. #36
    Super Member Farm Quilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by masufa View Post
    I would use the high-loft bat and tie it.
    To get a comforter like this you may need to tie it. I tried to double a poly batting because I thought it was too thin...the longarm I used (a wonderful friend's in Florida) could not handle the height, requiring me to hold down the quilt in order to quilt it. I chose to remove it from the frame, frog the quilting and remove one of the batts. I don't know how thick a DSM would be able to quilt on either. I would probably tell her that you make quilts, not comforters and she can buy a comforter at Wal~Mart.

  12. #37
    Senior Member margie77072's Avatar
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    What great ideas!!

  13. #38
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Valerie Ann View Post
    My daughter has requested that the quilt that I am currently working on to be "thick." She said, "You know--like the store-bought comforter on my bed." So, how do I do that? Use polyester batting (rather than the wool or bamboo that I ordinarily use) or double the batting in it????? Looking forward to your responses and THANKS!
    It has been my experience with the "store-bought" comforters that once washed, the batting lumps up. They're nice and fluffy because the quilting is so limited.
    One step at a time, always forward.

  14. #39
    Super Member Greenheron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GailG View Post
    It has been my experience with the "store-bought" comforters that once washed, the batting lumps up. They're nice and fluffy because the quilting is so limited.
    Luckily, my experience with thrift store comforters has been more positive. I would not purchase a new, high quality comforter but in our local church-sponsored thrift stores I have found very good ones probably the donation of someone re-decorating. Not only have I used some as batt but also as spreads on beds and furniture because of the four house dogs. The good ones haven't bunched up and the quality fabric resists the pups' 'nest building' activities. When shopping "feel" the filling--highly bonded batts don't bunch; puffy, silky feeling, loose poly will disappoint you.

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