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Thread: Help needed re: bias sides on sqs on point fillers..

  1. #1
    Super Member luvTooQuilt's Avatar
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    Help needed re: bias sides on sqs on point fillers..

    ok so im working on a UFO.. and i remember now why it was put away... my HST's are all cut on the bias and dummy me managed to stretch them wonky..

    My question is, since this is going to be a me quilt anyway whats the easiest fix to remove/lessen the Wonky, stretched out bias without making it a night with jack the ripper???

    it will definitely have puckers, but any suggestions to make them more minimal?? Ive starched them to a smidge shy of a stiff board and boy are they 'wavy'...

    any suggestions??

  2. #2
    Super Member LynnVT's Avatar
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    Big can of spray starch and nice hot iron! It hides a multitude of sins, in my humble opinion.
    "The business of life is making memories. In the end, it is all we have." Butler Charlie Carson, Downton Abbey, season 4, episode 3, PBS.

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    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I would just quilt it the way it is. At this point, there's probably not much you could do except unsewing and re-sewing. I was going to recommend starching, but you've already done that. This kind of quilt can actually become a family favorite, especially with children, because it's the quilt that's okay to use to make play tents with, cuddle with when you're really sick, use for picnics on the floor or outside in the back yard, etc.

    Sometimes you just have to finish up a UFO and move on......

  4. #4
    Super Member luvTooQuilt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post

    Sometimes you just have to finish up a UFO and move on......
    AMEN !!!! I hear that...

  5. #5
    Super Member luvTooQuilt's Avatar
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    im gonna have some pretty BIG puckers..
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #6
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    If it's only the side setting triangles that are like that, I would probably take them out and cut new ones, or cut these down to correct size before piecing them back in. Alternatively, you can try un-sewing just one edge. Then fold over the excess into that seam, iron, trim, and sew just that one side back in.

    If you still have some excess fabric in the edge when you layer, you can run a gathering stitch along each edge. Pull up the gathering stitches as needed to evenly ease the fabric. If it's not too much, you will be able to eliminate most of the puckers. You could do the same thing with the top as is in the photo; in that case you will have puckers in the edge, but at least they will be evenly distributed puckers!

  7. #7
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    If you decide to take those out and make new side setting triangles, try using QSTs instead of HSTs, so there won't be bias on the outside edges. Or... (and this is really going out on a limb) you might try giving your quilt a scalloped edge by cutting into the setting triangles! If it works out great (and I think it might) you can pretend that was your intention all along.

  8. #8
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    I would take them out and resize them. That looks like a very nice quilt otherwise. I really like the patttern.
    follow your dreams you never know where they will take you

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    Super Member snipforfun's Avatar
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    Setting triangles are usually made from large squares cut diagonally twice. The long edges will be on the straight of grain. Here is the formula. http://quilting.about.com/od/quiltse...ngtriangls.htm

  10. #10
    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
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    If they were originally the right size, then only stretched out of shape, you may be able to "shrink" them back into shape, with steam (not pressing, until after the shape is regained). Not sure how the starch will affect this, though.
    Neesie


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  11. #11
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    Well doesn't that just butter your biscuits!!! I watched Sharon Scamber's(sp) YouTube video of her shrinking a quilt block down about 1/2 inch. If I hadn't seen it, I wouldn't have believed it. She did it with repeated scratch and pressing. Watch how she does it and give the triangles a try before making a date with Jack the ripper. You could also try adding a straight of grain border along the sides. Put the triangles on the bottom and see if the feed dogs can ease them in with the correct size border?

  12. #12
    Senior Member kristakz's Avatar
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    I have in the past taken a triangle like this, and simply pressed the "excess" into a pleat along the seam line. Hides nicely when you quilt it, and avoids the pain of ripping it all out. Or, as an earlier poster said - cut your borders the correct length, and ease the wave into it. You will likely have a bit of a wavy quilt in the end but the UFO will be done.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by luvTooQuilt View Post
    ok so im working on a UFO.. and i remember now why it was put away... my HST's are all cut on the bias and dummy me managed to stretch them wonky..

    My question is, since this is going to be a me quilt anyway whats the easiest fix to remove/lessen the Wonky, stretched out bias without making it a night with jack the ripper???

    it will definitely have puckers, but any suggestions to make them more minimal?? Ive starched them to a smidge shy of a stiff board and boy are they 'wavy'...

    any suggestions??
    After seeing your quilt; I'd measure the sides; take the average and make a border and then ease it all in and it won't be wavy anymore. It's not that bad and pretty easy to fix. I would starch it like crazy to keep it from stretching amy more than it is until after the border goes on though. That's my opinion.
    Judy

  14. #14
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    My first thought was:

    1) IF you have enough of the triangle fabric - to cut new triangles so that the long edge is on the outside.

    My second though was - which will be contrary to just about everything I've read so far:

    Remove the triangles - soak them in hot water for about 20 minutes - swish them around a few times - to help the fabric get back to whatever it's 'normal' was and to remove the starch. Dry them on a towel or over a towel bar. Then press them gently 'on the grain' and see what they look like. They may have gotten stretched way out of shape with all the handling.

    For an experiment, you could trace around the pieces to see what they look like before you dunk them and then compare the 'after' to it.

  15. #15
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Turn it into a dart, right down the center of the triangle, to flatten it. Make it a case of "If you've got it, flaunt it"!!
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider View Post
    Turn it into a dart, right down the center of the triangle, to flatten it. Make it a case of "If you've got it, flaunt it"!!
    If you take the seam right up to the point of the triangle - it would look just like another seam.

  17. #17
    Super Member ArtsyOne's Avatar
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    Ghostrider, Bearisgray and I must be garment sewers - the first thing I thought of was to make a straight dart from the point of the triangle all the way out to the edge and make it look like another seam.
    A fabric stash is always missing that one fabric needed to finish the quilt on which you're working.

  18. #18
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    How many are there?
    Do you own a really good ripper?
    Do you like the quilt pretty well other than the side triangles?
    Do you have a good show to watch while you sit an rip of an evening?
    Personally, with positive answers to these ???, I'd be ripping (or reverse sewing, as I prefer to call it).
    Ultimately I'd be SO much happier with the quilt, because it it's worth doing, it's worth doing well.

    Jan in VA
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    peacefully colors my world.
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/members...bums19552.html

  19. #19
    Super Member azwendyg's Avatar
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    Assuming the triangles were the right size in the first place, I'd do a long stitch along the outside so I could ease the fullness back where it came from by pulling the thread and then steam/press it with starch to stabilize it. I helped my daughter with a similar problem and it worked out great! If I know I will have bias pieces on an edge, I'll often stay-stitch them first.
    Wendy

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