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Thread: help with slightly wavy borders

  1. #26
    Senior Member Pat M.'s Avatar
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    Did you measure down the middle of the quilt? Then the two sides? Figure out the average size and then cut the borders to that size. Pin the border sides on, may have to scrunch or stretch a little. Sew them. Measure again for the top and bottom, do the same again, scrunch or stretch. Should have a flat quilt. Look it up on the U Tube for pictures. Also, crosswise fabric stretches a little, so if you have the material, cut on the length of the fabric. I like the colors of your quilt.

  2. #27
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    I'm with you. I never measure my quilts and they always seem to come out not wavy. Glad to find another renegade out there!!!

  3. #28
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    I guess its all up to each of us to do as we like, but in my opinon I have spent alot of time and money to do the piecing and it only takes a few minutes and steps to assure the boarders are just as nice !!!

    There are customers that bring in quilts time and time again that have done a beautiful job on the tops until you get them loaded on the machine and see how bad the boarders are. I refuse to do those customer quilts anymore and leave them for someone else or they wait to get done when I have time to restle with them on the machine because that is just you have to do !!!! You have to stand right there to do alot of manipulating, I always let the customer know and charge them more !! We are LA's not miracle workers.......

  4. #29
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    In defence of the long arm quilter: if you insist on not correcting the wavy borders please do not blame the long arm quilter if you have tucks and still wavy borders when it is returned to you.

    There is an old saying - an ounce of protection is worth a pound of cure. Measure thru the middle of the quilt either vertical or horizontal. cut that border fabric to that length X 2. Now divide your quilt into 4th's and the cut borders into 4th's; pin together at the pin sites. When those borders on sewn then do the same measurement to the remaining border. There should be no waves. I hope you try it - it works.

  5. #30
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Unless the border is essential to the look of the quilt I seldom put a border on. I think too many quilts look like framed pictures. Most borders don't add anything to the quilt but size.
    Got fabric?

  6. #31
    Super Member callen's Avatar
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    I also would take them off one more time & try starching them so they won't stretch. Try pinning them from the centre out rather than from one end to the other. Maybe this will help but it might be worth a try. Good luck.
    Dance like no one is watching

  7. #32
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcrow View Post
    I never have wavy borders. I'm not the best quilter by far, but for some reason (knock on wood) my borders always lay flat. I don't know what I do 'right' to make them lay flat. I know I don't measure my quilt in the middle. Never have. I don't measure it anywhere. I just make sure I have enough border (always a few inches extra) to go from one end to the other and sew it. And I never have wavy borders. My LAer told my LQS owner that she is very impressed with my sewing. I was shocked because I don't do the things that everyone else does - like measure the middle of the quilt and make your borders that size. But it works for me and I'm not changing.
    I used to measure the middle of the quilt like everyone suggests, and it NEVER turned out right. Now I do it like you do - I lay the quilt down flat, pin the border and sew, then trim it off. Generally don't have a problem.

  8. #33
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    I agree with bellaboo about borders being frames. When I have to add borders I do not measure either. I
    usually do not have a problem with them.

  9. #34
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
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    I suggest you check out the Youtube video, "You can quilt that out". I am a novice long arm quilter, and I would suggest that if you expect the best from the long arm quilter, then you should give the long arm quilter the best you can do. We are not magicians. If you measure your quilt away from the edge of the top and cut both sides the same identical length, and then pin pin pin, you shouldn't have wavy borders. I always pin the ends first and then work from the center out. My mother used to say "Any job worth doing is worth doing well". Don't assume someone else will be able to cover your mistakes.

  10. #35
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    warp/weft

    Quote Originally Posted by PatriceJ View Post
    these are suggestions for future quilts since you have already decided to not change this one.

    you didn't mention whether or not you used a walking foot.
    if you didn't, i highly recommend you use one for future borders.
    they are also very helpful when attaching binding.

    i never cut my border strips across the width of the fabric. (weft/woof)
    i cut up the length of the fabric. (warp)

    this will sometimes mean additional piecing to get borders the length i need, but it's well worth the effort.

    the woof/weft stretches.
    the warp does not.

    little saying to help me remember:
    the fabric's warp will not [warp].
    OK, I have thought about this. Does the warp run in the same direction of the selvage? So, does your cut run parallel to the selvage? I think this is a tip that I will be using but I want to make sure that I am clear on how to do it.
    Thanks
    Kim

  11. #36
    Super Member joym's Avatar
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    just FYI....that particular fabric that you are using for the border is very stretchy. I have used it before.

  12. #37
    Super Member kydeb's Avatar
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    Bonnie's method is great! I never "measure" for a border. It's easier to me to lay it out than trying to make sure a measuring tape doesn't move. Since I've been doing it this way, I haven't had any wavy borders. My sister is just learning to quilt and was having border issues. Once she started doing it the way I do, no more problems! I wouldn't give it to a longarmer with wavy borders. Good luck!!
    Debbie in Kentucky
    kydeb.wordpress.com

  13. #38
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    I totally agree with all on the redo to get the borders done without waves but I more so agree with CorgiNole about no borders. This is a spectacular looking quilt on its own without the borders.

  14. #39
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    O.K, here goes - from the point of a longarm quilter - if these borders are not ripped, cut down and resewn to the quilt top, there will be puckers or pleats when the quilting is done. Most longarmers can work in about 1 inch of fullness, but I'm seeing more than 1 inch on these borders. Your longarm quilter may ask if it is o.k with you to make a "seam" 2 or 3 places along the border to take in the fullness before quilting or these "seams" can be fingure pressed and quilted over while the quilting is being done. A good longarmer will be able do this so the "seams" are hardly noticeable. However; the best method to insure the quilt looks its best when completed would be to rip off the borders and redo them to remove the "ruffles" prior to quilting.

  15. #40
    Super Member misseva's Avatar
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    I vote for removing the borders period. IMHO the borders detract from the quilt top.
    TwandasMom

  16. #41
    Super Member Corky's Avatar
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    This is great advice and makes all the difference. The ONLY time I will cut across the width (selvedge to selvedge) is with a directional print.

    Also, always measure across the middle and sides to get an average, then cut the borders exactly to that size. I allows you to ease in any extra or stretch a bit if needed to make the quilt square. Once your border piece is cut to the exact measurement, find the center of your quilt side and match it to the center of the border strip. Start pinning from the center and work out to both corners.

    Also, make sure you are not stretching the border as you sew,
    Quote Originally Posted by PatriceJ View Post
    these are suggestions for future quilts since you have already decided to not change this one.

    you didn't mention whether or not you used a walking foot.
    if you didn't, i highly recommend you use one for future borders.
    they are also very helpful when attaching binding.

    i never cut my border strips across the width of the fabric. (weft/woof)
    i cut up the length of the fabric. (warp)

    this will sometimes mean additional piecing to get borders the length i need, but it's well worth the effort.

    the woof/weft stretches.
    the warp does not.

    little saying to help me remember:
    the fabric's warp will not [warp].
    You have brains in your head.
    You have feet in your shoes.
    You can steer yourself any direction you choose.
    You’re on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the guy who’ll decide where to go. (Dr. Seuss)

  17. #42
    Super Member Corky's Avatar
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    If you cannot remember, just take the edge of the fabric and pull a bit. The side along the selvedges will not stretch, the side (width) from selvedge to selvedge will stretch and that is the one you do not want to use. Yes, you may have to piece it but it's worth it to not deal with wavy borders

    Quote Originally Posted by kjohnson0523 View Post
    OK, I have thought about this. Does the warp run in the same direction of the selvage? So, does your cut run parallel to the selvage? I think this is a tip that I will be using but I want to make sure that I am clear on how to do it.
    Thanks
    Kim
    You have brains in your head.
    You have feet in your shoes.
    You can steer yourself any direction you choose.
    You’re on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the guy who’ll decide where to go. (Dr. Seuss)

  18. #43
    Super Member duckydo's Avatar
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    Bonnie Hunter at quiltville.com has the best explanation of how to put on boders and not have them waving.. since I started using her method have not has any wavy boarders... If someone else has posted this, sorry for the repeat.

  19. #44
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    As a LAer, I have eased in more fabric then I see in your picture. I think it will not be hard for your LAer to do so also.

  20. #45
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    Your quilt top is very pretty and doesn't need anything else. It's pretty on its own. I vote for going without the border. I know everyone has their own personal preferences, but my favorite quilts are always those without borders.

  21. #46
    Super Member QultingaddictUK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    Unless the border is essential to the look of the quilt I seldom put a border on. I think too many quilts look like framed pictures. Most borders don't add anything to the quilt but size.
    We all have our opinion, its the differences that makes the world go round, but I must admit that I like "framing" my quilts with borders.

    This recently finished one would be nothing without it's borders, in my opinion.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  22. #47
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    I think if you don't remove that border you will always be aware that the problem is there and never be happy with the finished quilt. Though I'm certainly no expert, it's hard to understand how a longarmer could deal with it to your satisfaction in the end.

    I do want to add that I agree that the quilt top without the border is beautiful, but the pattern is complex enough that just a binding would be prettier on it, IMHO only, of course. The current border fabric doesn't seem to quite fit with the rest of the fabrics colorwise.

  23. #48
    Super Member Minnesewta-sam's Avatar
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    Other than the border, the quilt looks really squared. I would remove the border and leave it off. I think that outside fabric detracts from the beauty of the quit IMHO. Thanks for sharing and good luck with whatever you decide.
    Confirmed fabric-holic seeking 12 step treatment program or a storage building.

  24. #49
    Super Member sewdamncute's Avatar
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    I frequently get customer quilts with wavy borders....follow all the good advice here, it is best to do it correctly. That being said, here is a before and after.[ATTACH=CONFIG]387330[/ATSTACH]Name:  phone12-12 190.JPG
Views: 115
Size:  235.3 KB

    Sorry for the first giant picture...couldn't seem to delete it. The pictures do not show the exact same spot on the border, but with alot of easing and a great steam iron I was able to flatten it out.
    Attached Images Attached Images

    Last edited by sewdamncute; 01-10-2013 at 06:23 PM.
    Blessed Be
    Darlene

  25. #50
    Senior Member rush88888's Avatar
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    i want to thank everyone for their time in answering my question. measuring vs. not measuring seems to be split 50-50. some people thought that the border detracted from the whole...that said, i will probably be cutting down the border some. i think that might help with the waviness a little. i learned alot from this quilt! there are flaws...plenty of mistakes in measuring! my accuracy needs to improve! i only hope that, as time goes on, i can improve my skills. again...thank you to everyone for your opinions as i valued every one!

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