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Thread: Help!!

  1. #1
    kbiederman's Avatar
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    I am attempting to machine quilt for the first time and I am having so much dificulty! Even though I pinned it to death, the fabric is still bunching a little on the back, and I ended up just taking out what I have done so far. What do I do now? I was so excited to about learning this part of it, and now all I have it a backache. :? Thanks, Karen

  2. #2
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Are your pins no more than 4inches apart? I tried going further and it bunched up horribly.
    Are you using a walking foot?

  3. #3
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Did you stretch the backing out and secure it before placing the batting and top on it?

  4. #4
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    i use basting spray if it's not on a frame and safety pins and start in the middle of the quilt but i still stop and check it just in case.. i prefer a frame

    mema

  5. #5
    Super Member lisalovesquilting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amma
    Did you stretch the backing out and secure it before placing the batting and top on it?
    This is good advice. A very important step.

  6. #6
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    I was told to starch the backing like crazy. I've done that on each of my quilts and have not had a bunching problem.

    LOTS of starch and LOTS MORE pins. I was told to make a fist. Anywhere you put your fist down, it should be touching pins.

  7. #7
    Super Member shaverg's Avatar
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    Do you have a walking foot? It will definitely bunch up on the back if you don't use a walking foot.

  8. #8
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    Maybe your bobbin tension is too tight. Are you using the same weight thread? You can purchase a special bobbin case for some machines for quilting/stippling.

    I usually start in the center of the quilt and quilt outward.

    When layering the quilt, I use masking tape to tape the corners of the backing to my kitchen floor; then place the batting on top, then the quilt top and pin. Next I flip it over to check for ripples and try to get it as smooth as possible. (My knees and back do not like this technique! LOL)

    Hope this helps.

  9. #9
    kbiederman's Avatar
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    I did pin about every 5 inches, but did not secure the corners. I do not have a walking foot, and have not tried starching. Looks like I have a lot more to do to machine quilt it! I have a year old Singer Simple, works very well for what I have needed it for, but where do I find a walking foot? I am so thankful to have this board to ask, instead of spending years trying to figure what I'm doing wrong!! Thank you for taking the time to give all the awesome advice! Karen

  10. #10
    Super Member shaverg's Avatar
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    I think if you can get a walking foot you will notice a huge difference. My quilting friend who is brand new to quilting was having the same problem and was getting discouraged. I convinced or to get a walking foot. She has mad 12+ quilts in about 8 months now and she was a brand new quilter.

    She now believes in the walking foot.

  11. #11
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    You can get a walking foot at a quilt show; I picked up an inexpensive generic one for a Featherweight for about
    $13.00. Check your local fabric stores. I know that Joann's
    has them; you could also check a sew and vac repair shop. Just make sure it's compatible with your machine. Lastly, you can always find one online. Walking feet really make a difference.

  12. #12
    kbiederman's Avatar
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    A generic walking foot at JoAnns? I know I asked them if they had ones for Singers and they said no. Is Featherweight the brand? I have spray basted, repinned (about every 2 inches now) and started sewing right on the inside of every block. It is quite tedious, but seems to be paying off, no huge mishaps yet! I would still like to get the walking foot to do some more inside each of the blocks, so I am anxious to get it done this week. Thanks for the tip!

  13. #13
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    Sorry, a Featherweight is a really old Singer machine from the 1930s to 50s. They weight about 10 pounds and are great for traveling or quilt workshops. They only have one stitch.

    As for the walking foot at Joann's, it was with the sewing machine attachments and I didn't pay to much attention to it as I had one already, it looked like the one that I had picked up at the show. I have a Janome 6600 which has accufeed, a built in foot if you care to use it, so a walking foot is not needed.

    I'm glad that your quilting is getting better. The more you do it, the better you get. And the prep does really pay off. I'm always so anxious to get started, that I used to cut corners - not any more.

  14. #14
    quiltingmom86's Avatar
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    I ordered my walking foot from Keepsake quilting. Would not do without it now.
    It is worth the money for sure.
    good luck.
    quiltingmom86

  15. #15
    Power Poster sewnsewer2's Avatar
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    Karen, if you are doing free motion drop the feed dogs and use your darning foot. Up if you are doing straight lines with a walking foot.

  16. #16
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    I just got a generic walking foot today from Joann's. I think there is a 50% off coupon on their site right now. I have a singer 7444, and it went right on, no problem. I tested a scrap sandwich piece with it and without it, and could really tell the difference! Can't wait to get the next top done lol Good luck to ya :)

  17. #17
    Senior Member nellebelles's Avatar
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    Another tip: the size of safety pins can make a huge difference when you are pin basting a quilt. If the safety pins are too big, they can slip around after you've pinned the quilt sandwich together. I like to use fairly small ones so that this doesn't happen. Ask me how I know this... :-(

  18. #18
    Super Member ConnieF's Avatar
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    First Question what is the size of this quilt?

    Quilting on a reg machine?

    You are quilting then binding it?

    KK2000 is so wonderfullllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll

    ConnieF

  19. #19
    Super Member ConnieF's Avatar
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    Allso how are you quilting this? Freehand or in the ditch or?

    For free hand like stipling or you need to drop the feed dogs.

    And yes always start from the center and work your way out.

    The basting spray is what I always use now. Just make sure no steam tll it is all gone or use a DRY iron over it and it will go away...

    Connie F

  20. #20
    kbiederman's Avatar
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    The unfinished top is about 59x79. I am free motion quilting it on my Singer, regular machine. I was aphrensive to stich in the ditch, as it would show how I can NOT stich a straight line that has to show. (Especially on the back where it would be plainly evident!)
    I am making a d9p, and started with sewing inside each of the blocks. Instead of stiching in the ditch, I made a "wavy" line around the inside of each block. (I am sure there is a name for it but I don't know it.) This gave me more "room" for mistakes :)
    Don't laugh, but I am not altogether sure how to drop the feed dogs on my machine, and I was scared that the quilt would go all over the place if I did. This is somewhat of a "practice" quilt for one I want to make for my DD, and didn't want to "figure it out" on hers. I am hoping to get out and find a walking foot today, and either use it to finish my blocks, or to do some additional quilting inside the blocks once I have them all done.
    SOOOO, what can you tell me that I should do differently on the REAL one? Lol, this one has turned out beautifully. Thanks for all your help!! ~K

  21. #21
    Power Poster sewnsewer2's Avatar
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    If you haven't already, please post a pic so we can see it.

  22. #22
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    we want to see it

  23. #23
    Super Member ConnieF's Avatar
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    If you are doing freemotion you have to drop the feed dogs,

    but if just st n the ditch you can leave them up. If the feeddogs do not drop there is usually a cover for them...

    The basting spray keeps all together ad no pins to watch for

  24. #24
    deedles215's Avatar
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    Yeah, yeah, post a picture!! :)

  25. #25

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    Sounds like you are determined to figure this out, so I am sure that you will get the hang of it.

    I may be repeating some advice here:

    Walking Foot is for Straight Lines...
    Stippling or Meandering is what you were talking about when creating the wavy lines or turning curves, etc.

    To do straight lines, you leave the feed dogs up.
    To do Free Motion Quilting, you drop the Feed Dogs or cover them and You control the length of the stitches by moving the fabric with your hands. Free Motion needs to be practiced on a sandwich of scrap fabric with batting and backing to get the hang of it. Use a Darning Foot for free motion quilting. That's the basics of machine quilting. The thread that you use and the needle, etc. will affect the tension especially of the bobbin which can sometimes be a problem.
    Hope this helps. Am still learning my self.

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