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Thread: Help from those of you who machine quilt on your DSM

  1. #1
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    I am just starting to machine quilt, so I don't know a lot about it. A friend of mine was told to always stitch in the ditch around her blocks, then to do any fancier stitching after that. I am wondering why. I wouldn't want to do that always, it wouldn't look good with some designs. Do you do it that way? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    You never have to do SID. Many people do an all over design. Some just echo quilt. It depends on the look you want and how closely the batting must be quilted.

  3. #3
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    Thank you for asking this question as I too have been told to always do SID around blocks.

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    I think you are going to learn there are no quilt police here and anything goes. Do what you want to do and how you want to do it. Are you using a regular sewing machine? It may be easier to do the FMQ in smaller sections? Not sure why they would say you always do it that way as long as it is basted. I will keep watching too.

  5. #5
    Super Member gale's Avatar
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    I never SID. I can't do it. I can't stay in the darn ditch to save my life, no matter what gadgets I try. I just do straight line, usually cross hatching, but NOT in the ditch. Away from the ditch. Far away.

  6. #6
    Senior Member VickyS's Avatar
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    I only SID when I'm in a hurry to get it done. Otherwise, whatever looks good is what you should do. Sometimes you want to frame a particular quilt pattern, then SID works well.

    I'm a beginning/intermediate machine quilter - I've made enough quilts to know I'm not very good, but not enough to get better (YET!). As such, SID is sometimes the nicer looking of my attempts to machine quilt. But, like they say, practice makes perfect, so moving on to something else is the only way to learn.

    Good luck with your machine quilting!

  7. #7
    Super Member noveltyjunkie's Avatar
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    Some of the (many, differing) articles I have read recommend doing this to stabilise the sandwich. I certainly would not feel obliged to do it, unless I thought it would look good and enhance the piecing. Do what you like- it's your quilt!

  8. #8
    k3n
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    Quote Originally Posted by noveltyjunkie
    Some of the (many, differing) articles I have read recommend doing this to stabilise the sandwich. I certainly would not feel obliged to do it, unless I thought it would look good and enhance the piecing. Do what you like- it's your quilt!
    I agree - unless it's part of your quilting design, you don't have to do it to stabilise. I recently did an advanced FMQ workshop with Ferret who is a major award winning English quilter and she said she nearly never SITDs on a DSM - quote 'if you don't do it well, it looks like poo and if you DO, no one can see it, so what's the point?' :mrgreen: Baste well, start somewhere toward the centre and work outwards, bunch the excess quilt up under the throat DON'T roll it as this pulls the top and backing at different rates and away you go. :-D

  9. #9
    Super Member kiffie2413's Avatar
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    I have heard that if you are going to do any stitch in ditch or 1/4" away/any straight stitch, to do that 1st...then do the fmq you planned...some people do a combo of both, and I was told that was the easiest way to do it...but, as we all know, no quilt police here!!!

  10. #10
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    I think kiffie and I have learned it the same way - if you are going to SITD, you do it before FMQ.

    But, like everyone else says, you never have to SITD.

    I like to use it on borders because it really does make the line between border and quilt lie flat and even, but I try not to do any SITD other than that.

    SITD is much harder for me than any other part of the quilt - keeping that stitching hidden is incredibly hard!

  11. #11
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    Thank you everyone for your replies. I believe my friend was told to stitch in the ditch to stabalize the quilt first. I know that it wouldn't show on top, but it would show on the back, and like I said earlier, with some designs, it wouldn't look good. I just wonder, if you have the quilt basted well, why would it need more stabalizing? Have any of you had bad things happen when you don't stitch in the ditch?

  12. #12
    k3n
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    Quote Originally Posted by roselady
    Thank you everyone for your replies. I believe my friend was told to stitch in the ditch to stabalize the quilt first. I know that it wouldn't show on top, but it would show on the back, and like I said earlier, with some designs, it wouldn't look good. I just wonder, if you have the quilt basted well, why would it need more stabalizing? Have any of you had bad things happen when you don't stitch in the ditch?
    I hardly SITD these days, as I said, unless the quilting design requires it and my quilts come out OK... even won a couple of awards. :-D

  13. #13
    Senior Member VickyS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roselady
    Have any of you had bad things happen when you don't stitch in the ditch?
    Actually the other way around... I've SID and had the top or bottom or both pucker where the SID came together. Only way non-SID would pucker is if you FMQ too close together without adequate stabilization.

    I've spray basted, stitch basted, and pin basted and still had problems if the quilt top wasn't flat or the back was fed wrong when I FMQ. It all comes back to practice. I hate it but I still have to do it if I want to finish any of my backlog without doing it by hand (and Arthur Itis has a say about that!).

  14. #14
    Senior Member MIJul's Avatar
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    Personal choice. I am one who likes SID, especially when I particularly LOVE the fabrics and want to showcase those instead of my quilting. If I want the fabrics to "pop", I SID. Everyone has what they like and this is mine. :-)

  15. #15
    Senior Member Rusty's Mama's Avatar
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    I have never done SID. I want to do SID on the quilt I am working on now, but usually I just stipple or do a simple overall design with loops. My quilts are mainly for charity and I don't do anything fancy, but I enjoy the quilting process.

  16. #16
    Member gailkv's Avatar
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    I have a quilt in the ditch machine foot for my sewing machine. I think all the domestic machines sell these as I have a Bernina and my friend a Janome and she also has stitch in the ditch foot.
    It helps to anchor your quilt first as this stops the back from moving.
    I also find stippling is an easy option.
    Don't make your quilt too large to begin with as it makes it harder to handle.
    Make sure you use the same type of thread on top as on your bobbin. Doesn't have to be the same colour, just the same sort.
    Thinner batting is easier to quilt than thicker. I personally prefer bamboo or cotton.
    Good luck, don't worry, do a little at a time and when you have finished you will feel a great sense of achievment.

  17. #17
    Senior Member sewgray's Avatar
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    The class I took the teacher told us to do this. It's to stablize the sandwich and you shouldn't be able to see it. I have done it on my quilts and no puckers, front or back.

  18. #18
    Kas
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    I have never done this. Diane Guadynski says to do it with disolving thread if you don't want it to show but desire the stabilization. She does it so her horizontal and vertical lines stay straight for showing. Sometimes when you quilt over a border it pulls the fabric into a very slight curve. Points off in a show for that.

  19. #19
    Super Member gale's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gailkv
    I have a quilt in the ditch machine foot for my sewing machine. I think all the domestic machines sell these as I have a Bernina and my friend a Janome and she also has stitch in the ditch foot.
    I have always had one too but it's not a walking foot. I would need a SID and walking foot combo. I could have that now (with my accufeed) but I still don't SID.

  20. #20
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gale
    I never SID. I can't do it. I can't stay in the darn ditch to save my life, no matter what gadgets I try. I just do straight line, usually cross hatching, but NOT in the ditch. Away from the ditch. Far away.
    Ha ha! I bought a SID foot and I absolutely LOVE it! Keeps my stitching right where it is supposed to be!

  21. #21
    Super Member gale's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by auntpiggylpn
    Quote Originally Posted by gale
    I never SID. I can't do it. I can't stay in the darn ditch to save my life, no matter what gadgets I try. I just do straight line, usually cross hatching, but NOT in the ditch. Away from the ditch. Far away.
    Ha ha! I bought a SID foot and I absolutely LOVE it! Keeps my stitching right where it is supposed to be!
    But is your SID foot a walking foot too? I bought a SID foot years ago but got terrible tucks when using it because my layers weren't feeding evenly. Now I have the Janome 6600 which has accufeed but I'm over SID. I don't even care if I ever do it anymore.

  22. #22
    Super Member gale's Avatar
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    double post. :roll:

  23. #23
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
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    I piece my quilt tops with a walking foot but I have not had any troubles with my stitch in the ditch foot causing puckers.

  24. #24
    Super Member gale's Avatar
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    That's opposite of what I do. I piece using a regular foot and quilt using a walking foot.

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