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Thread: Hit the jackpot! But have an issue Hope you Help?

  1. #1
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    Red face Hit the jackpot! But have an issue Hope you Help?

    I was fortunate to buy a quilter's stash. Completewith tools, books, patterns, fabric and more! All for $500. There was over 1400 fat quarters and lots of yardage. Small containers with blocks cut and some put together. Quilt tops and some to bind also.
    The problem is all this came from a smoker's house. How do I get the smoke smell out without washing???
    I am laying it out now in single layers in the garage and airing out and spraying febreze. What can I do that might be faster??
    Can I use bowls of vinegar setting around???

    Thanks for all your help
    Candlenana

  2. #2
    Super Member wesing's Avatar
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    I would wash he yardage and FQ, but the smaller cuts and partials probably should be finished before they are washed. You could try baking soda, cat litter, dryer sheets, or misting with something like Mary Ellen's Best Press. I hope you enjoy your new treasures.

    Darren

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    Super Member Annie68's Avatar
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    Put it in a large green trash bag with a bar of Dial soap. I've heard that works with odors. You may have to use several bags with your large amount of fabric. Leave in bag closed up for several days. Good luck

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    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    maybe put it in a bag with one of those baking soda discs and wash in oxyclean and arm and hammer detergent with baking soda in it. I hear airing it outside helps as well
    Brother XL-3500i, SQ-9050, Dreamweaver XE6200D, Juki MO-2000QVP

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    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I would invest in a few pairs of Dr. Scholl's charcoal Odoreaters shoe inserts. The charcoal in them absorbs odors. You can place fabric in a garbage bag with a couple of the inserts, leave for a week, then check.

    Or try these:
    http://www.amazon.com/MOSO-MB2578-Mo...dp/B004BOHV7Q/

    Charcoal is the best odor neutralizer I have found, but the trick is to keep the charcoal off your fabric. Dry coffee grounds are supposed to be excellent also.

    If you Google "best way to remove tobacco smoke from fabric" you will find a number of ideas.

  6. #6
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I would all the fabric I could. It will all dissipate over time on the non washable items. Use a room air freshener until then.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

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    I would wash everything which is easily washed, as someone else suggested. One thing I recently found, quite accidentally, which took a mildew smell out of a book I bought, is placing the offensive smelling item inside a scented, odor removing kitchen bag! Dh buys these, I don't. I only put the book into the kitchen bag because I didn't want to smell it, and that's the kind of bags we happened to have at the time. Later, when I removed the book from the bag, which was in my car for a couple of weeks (didn't want it in the house), the smell was barely there!! Not sure if it will work with all brands---the bags we had were Hefty Odor Block, Lavender-Vanilla scented.

  8. #8
    Super Member Pat625's Avatar
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    I deal with all odors with the clean air candles. When my daughter got a car from a smoker, we simply put the open candle jar in her car..I have used these candles for many things, such as mildew odors, and even an exploding Duck egg smell in my incubator!! I first learned about them when I used to do craft shows, and ten years later still use them..I would put the candle in a box/ tote with the fabric..The link I use to get the candles is:http://southerncandle.com/shop/

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    I would be careful using Dial soap. Some of them have a very strong scent and it might be worse than the smoke smell.
    Carol

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    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Washing in hot soapy water will be only fast solution. One the tar settles on the fabric it is the only way to get it out, the smell will linger for months. Any scent you use to mask it will go away and leave the smoke scent. My guild will not take donated fabric from a smoker's home. We learned our lesson about that.
    Got fabric?

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    Good luck with the cleaning. - WASH - WASH

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    yel
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    what about a bag of charcoal either fish tank or grill??

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    Super Member nanacc's Avatar
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    I vote for steaming bowls of vinegar! Worked great in a combine my DH bought used from a smoker.

  14. #14
    Super Member Mitch's mom's Avatar
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    Call ServePro or a similar company that does disaster clean-up: House Fires, Flooding and the like. They can give you some excellent advice about removing the smell from your fabrics. My house partially burnt many years ago. All of my upholstered pieces of furniture smelled of smoke. My husband was also a smoker. When the cleaning company finished you would never have known there was a fire. They did not wet my furniture, they used some kind of osmosis thing on it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    Washing in hot soapy water will be only fast solution. One the tar settles on the fabric it is the only way to get it out, the smell will linger for months. Any scent you use to mask it will go away and leave the smoke scent. . . .
    I agree. Wash like colors together.

  16. #16
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dolphyngyrl View Post
    maybe put it in a bag with one of those baking soda discs and wash in oxyclean and arm and hammer detergent with baking soda in it. I hear airing it outside helps as well
    Maybe it's just me, but the Arm and Hammer detergent with baking soda has a very loud, offensive smell. I was so disappointed when I bought it. I ended up throwing it out because I couldn't stand the perfume in it..
    Bad Spellers of the World
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    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Candlenana View Post
    I was fortunate to buy a quilter's stash. Completewith tools, books, patterns, fabric and more! All for $500. There was over 1400 fat quarters and lots of yardage. Small containers with blocks cut and some put together. Quilt tops and some to bind also.
    The problem is all this came from a smoker's house. How do I get the smoke smell out without washing???
    I am laying it out now in single layers in the garage and airing out and spraying febreze. What can I do that might be faster??
    Can I use bowls of vinegar setting around???

    Thanks for all your help
    Candlenana
    My first choice would be to sort by color all the yardage and fat quarters. Sort batiks very carefully. You've got a big handy wash tub also known as a bath tub. Fill the tub with enough water to cover the fabric a couple inches. and add a bunch of oxy-clean, far more that the instructions say (Sun makes a much cheaper oxygen cleaner). Just lay the fabric pieces in the tub. Let this soak all day if you can. Every couple hours take a big pan lid or big plate and use it to squish the fabric up and down. Once I used the bottom of a trash can. If you see lots of yellow residue in the water, drain it and do it again. Depending on how nasty the smoke is, you may have to use the same routine minus the oxy-clean for several rinses. If you can, hang outdoors to dry.
    Bad Spellers of the World
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    Super Member katesnanna's Avatar
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    Plain White vinegar in a spray bottle is the best thing to remove odors of any kind. It's all we use in our house. It doesn't cover the smell it eliminates it totally.

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    Plain old cheap clay kitty litter is my favorite odor remover - even takes out skunk smell!

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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    Washing in hot soapy water will be only fast solution. One the tar settles on the fabric it is the only way to get it out, the smell will linger for months. Any scent you use to mask it will go away and leave the smoke scent. My guild will not take donated fabric from a smoker's home. We learned our lesson about that.
    \
    I agree, I use to be a smoker, can't stand the smell now, would have thought twice before I bought material from a smoker....sometimes you just can't get it out, even with washing!

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    I had a really bad tobacco odor to eliminate and after many tries I tried a sliced apple wrapped in news paper and left it for several days. It completely killed odor. I would place fabric in a plastic tub and add the apple/newspaper in several places it's a cheap try.

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    if you don't want to chance putting the fabric through a machine wash, how about soaking in a sink or the bathtub with Odo-Ban or Oxi-Clean? That's what's always worked for me. I recently purchase quite a bit of fabric from an estate sale. Everything was in boxes in a musty, damp basement. Oxi-Clean has become my best friend! That and my clothes line to dry in the warm breeze!!

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    Get some plain charcoal (not the kind that has the starter fluid already on it) and put some in a bowl in a box and add the fabric then seal it up. The charcoal will absorb the smell. I used this method to get rid of moth ball smell on an old quilt and it worked took a couple of rounds with the charcoal but it worked.

  24. #24
    Super Member AZ Jane's Avatar
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    I would be careful. I understand many people find cigarette smoke offensive but some of the "solutions" seem would make the smell worse. Unless you plan on using the fabric right away, I would just try charcoal first. Wash what can be washed and charcoal the rest.
    Better to do something imperfectly, than nothing perfectly.
    Done is better than perfect.

  25. #25
    Senior Member littlebitoheaven's Avatar
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    Smoking odor can be a really difficult problem. With the amount you have, whatever you decide to do will be a bit of work. Washing would be the best solution, however, keeping the odoriferous fabric from the clean fabric is necessary. The problem is smoke infiltrates every inch. Our daughter stored tons of boxes in our basement that she had packed for years and she is a heavy smoker. After the boxes were removed, it took me weeks to get the smell out of the basement. I used the odor remover containers from Menard's and I also bought a gallon of "Odo-ban" from Sams.

    My last suggestion is to separate into like piles and take to the laundromat and use the large washers and cold water. I know this is a ton of work but think of it as a job and how much money you are making by not having to buy all this fabric. Good luck. Let us know what you decide and how it works. Others will surely have this problem. Yolanda Wood Lake

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