Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Homespun Rag Quilts

  1. #1
    Senior Member barbrdunn's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Brentwood, CA
    Posts
    336
    I have seen patterns that suggested you could use homespuns to make rag quilts. I have lots of red/greens and was thinking about making a Christmas quilt. Has anyone used homespun for rag quilts, and if so, how do they fray? How much of a seam allowance do I need and how far apart do I need to moake my clips for them to fray nicely? Also, are they cozy enough to do without batting? I think a cotton batting might be too heave...any thoughts?

  2. #2
    Super Member virtualbernie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    3,587
    Blog Entries
    3
    When I first learned about rag quilts (years and years ago) it was suggested to only use Homespun because it had a loose weave that would fray very well. Of course now everything is being used. I ended up making a rag quilt out of Jeans fabric and no batting. I would use batting with the Homespun though. I've seen some beautiful ones made out of Homespun.

  3. #3
    Super Member chamby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Clemmons, NC
    Posts
    1,057
    Blog Entries
    1
    I made one for my son and his wife. I just love the way it turned out. It ravels just great. You will love working with the homespun for a rag quilt. Oh, I used 1/2 inch seam allowance. I always use 1/2 inch allowance on all my rag quilts.

  4. #4
    Power Poster earthwalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    10,356
    Homespun will be fine, like Chamby I stick to the 1/2 inch for all rag quilts. As VirtualBernie suggests I would use batting. I used batting for a large denim quilt, it was heavy, but my husband likes heavy coverings.

  5. #5
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    12,131
    Blog Entries
    1
    sometimes i think home spuns were made for raggy quilts! they turn out so wonderful. i too use 1/2" seams, as far as the clipping..i just put my snippers to work and snip, i don't worry too much about the distance between snips, somewhere between 1/4" & 1/2" probably...i figure, once it is washed it is not going to show if they are not perfectly even...they are going to fray enough.
    if you don't want to use batting a layer of flannel works well for inside, adds to the raggy edges nicely too.

  6. #6
    Super Member Mariah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Pittsburg, Kansas
    Posts
    1,689
    Blog Entries
    1
    I hate to admit it, but what is homespun fabric?
    I can give you a tip on not using batting. It is fine if you are typing it. I tried it on a quilt I made which was to be light-weight, like for a bedspread. I had it machine-quilted. She ran into trouble, and said if I did it again, I need to get the light-weight batting now on the market. It will machine-quilt much nicer. Neither of us thought of that when we were talking about it before her doing the work.
    Mariah.

  7. #7
    Super Member chamby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Clemmons, NC
    Posts
    1,057
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Mariah
    I hate to admit it, but what is homespun fabric?
    I can give you a tip on not using batting. It is fine if you are typing it. I tried it on a quilt I made which was to be light-weight, like for a bedspread. I had it machine-quilted. She ran into trouble, and said if I did it again, I need to get the light-weight batting now on the market. It will machine-quilt much nicer. Neither of us thought of that when we were talking about it before her doing the work.
    Mariah.
    I really do not know how to explain what homespun is. It is very country looking and light weight. You just need to go to fabric store and look at it.

  8. #8
    Super Member virtualbernie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    3,587
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by chamby
    Quote Originally Posted by Mariah
    I hate to admit it, but what is homespun fabric?
    I can give you a tip on not using batting. It is fine if you are typing it. I tried it on a quilt I made which was to be light-weight, like for a bedspread. I had it machine-quilted. She ran into trouble, and said if I did it again, I need to get the light-weight batting now on the market. It will machine-quilt much nicer. Neither of us thought of that when we were talking about it before her doing the work.
    Mariah.
    I really do not know how to explain what homespun is. It is very country looking and light weight. You just need to go to fabric store and look at it.
    Good answer! I couldn't figure out how to describe it so I kept my 2 cents worth to myself :thumbup: :lol:

  9. #9
    Super Member piepatch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,912
    I use homespun on all my rag quilts. I make a 3/4" seam, and clip the seam allowance every 1/4". I use the warm and natural batting, but a flannel or other batting would work well. I personally would not like a homespun quilt without batting because the fabric gets soft and kind of "limp" after a couple of washings. For denim or other heavy fabrics, I would not use batting because the quilt would be too heavy. I always wash the homespun fabric before I make the quilt, because it shrinks and some of the colors will bleed. Someone asked what homespun is.......well, the best I can describe it is that it is a rustic, cotton plaid fabric with a loose weave. It never seems to be woven straight, possibly because it is said to be made with "uneven" yarns. Some quilters love the wonky weave of the plaid, because it gives the quilt "motion", while I struggle to get my plaid squares cut straight :) Most all homespun is made in other countries, as is most of our fabrics now, but as recently as a few years ago, there was still some homespun on the market that was made in the USA. It was more expensive, but a much straighter weave, and the colors were more lasting. I am not sure if it is still available. If you use homespun fabric, don't ever figure your yardage based on the width of the fabric because it shrinks after it is washed. I never figure homespun to be more than 40" in width after washing, and not even that much when you consider how crooked the weave is up close to the selvedge. All things considered, I love the look of homespun for the rag quilts.

  10. #10
    CrazyAunt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Northwest Missouri
    Posts
    73
    I like homespun rag quilts, but I use osnaburg (my spelling may be off) as a batting. It is an unbleached looking loose weave muslin and it frays great for me.

  11. #11
    Super Member piepatch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,912
    This is really interesting. I love osnaburg, but have never used it as a batting. I can see how it would fray well. CrazyAunt, If you are using it as a batting, and it frays well, then you must be sewing it into the seams. Are you cutting the osnaburg the same size as the fabric squares?

  12. #12
    CrazyAunt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Northwest Missouri
    Posts
    73
    Yes, I cut it the same size as the blocks and it makes a really nice light weight batting. I also like the way the color of it shows up with the homespun after everything is clipped.

  13. #13
    Super Member piepatch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,912
    I was just thinking about the color of the osnaburg and how pretty it must be with the homespun. I love the color of osnaburg and I'll bet having it in every square gives the quilt some continuity. I like the idea of the light weight of it, and will absolutely have to try it.

  14. #14
    Junior Member zoey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    oklahoma
    Posts
    149
    If you have a local Hobby Lobby they sell a good selection of Homespun fabrics. Here in Broken Arrow it's $2.99 a yard and usually 30% off that price too. It's usually a loosely woven plaid and comes in all price ranges with Hobby Lobby being the cheapest I've seen so far. If you type in Homespun fabrics on your browser a lot of online stores are available most with instructions and pictures too.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.