Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 28

Thread: How can I avoid a nightmare?

  1. #1
    Super Member Ariannaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    in the sticks of PA
    Posts
    1,952

    How can I avoid a nightmare?

    I am making what I thought was going to be a very easy quilt, however I have just discovered a major problem. I am following a pattern from the Moda bake shop site and unfortunately because it seemed so easy I didn't realize that there is the potential for a big problem. So I am at the point of adding the setting triangles, seriously just about finished with this quilt. I discovered that almost every triangle is a biased edge. We are talking about 20 1/2 inches cut on the diagonal twice which when looking at the diagram puts the actual bias edge on the outside! Is there any way I can remedy this so that the edges are not waving like the flag? This is the first pattern for this designer on there and I tried to contact her but you can't leave any comments or questions at this point. Help!
    Maria
    Always be true to yourself!

  2. #2
    Super Member NZquilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    3,306
    Blog Entries
    1
    I would do a tight (about 13-15 stitches per inch) basting stitch 1/8 from the edge along the bias, taking as much care as possible not to stretch it. I don't know if you were planning on a border too, but I would put one, even if it's just narrow, to help stabilize it. With care it will work.
    We didn't realize we were making memories, we just knew we were having fun. ~ Winnie the Pooh ~

    1912 World's Rotary Treadle (White Company), 1942 Singer 66-16, 1952 Pfaff 130-6, 1954 Singer 15-91, 1956 Singer 201-2

  3. #3
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    35,811
    Have you already cut them? If not then put a row of stay stitching on all the bias edges before cutting them. If they are already cut, I might cut strips of tissue paper and stitch, stay stitching along the edges through the tissue paper. If you pin the bias edges to the paper, you will be able to tell if they are moving and correct them. Bias edges are not that difficult to manage if you use lots of pins and can pin them to a straight edge or border.

  4. #4
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Southern USA
    Posts
    11,111
    What I do for big bias edges is fuse strips of lightweight interfacing to the back before cutting. This will prevent any stretching at all. I put the strips in a X pattern then cut down the middle of the strips. I learned this from Anita Grossman Solomon. She has the lightweight 1 1/2" strips on her website pre cut on a roll. http://makeitsimpler.com/books-products.html
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
    Being cheap is not a badge of honor.
    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

  5. #5
    Senior Member tallchick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    885
    I agree with Onebyone, it’s a great and works well, I keep several rolls on hand for just this purpose. If not, then starch the dickens out out of them and handle with care till it’s all quilted and bound.
    Lisa

  6. #6
    Super Member Irishrose2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    2,135
    If it's already cut, spray it with starch and press - do not slide the iron - pick it up and set it down in a new place. Let it dry thoroughly and then handle it carefully. Pin the next border and sew with the bias edge on the bottom. I starch any fabric that's going to have bias edges before it's cut. Starch makes good glue.

  7. #7
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    22,729
    Can you post a link to the pattern?

    I would ignore the instructions and cut the triangles so that the straight of grain is on the outside edges.

  8. #8
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Lake Elsinore, CA
    Posts
    13,798
    Making a square and cutting two diagonals is the correct way to make setting triangles so that the straight of grain (not the bias) is on the outside edge. I think your pattern is correct, and you shouldn't have any problem with the sewing if you're careful not to stretch the bias edges while you're sewing them to the interior blocks of the quilt. The corner triangles are made by cutting only one diagonal through a square of a different size. Look at the pattern again and see if this makes sense to you.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Kwiltr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    East Kootenays, BC
    Posts
    883
    I ran into a similar problem with the Lonestar quilt pattern from the Moda Bakeshop and my quilt turned out less than perfect. The bias edges really threw things out of whack just piecing the Star, even tho I thought I was so careful and had pre-starched the fabric. Sounds like you’ve received some good ideas here. Good luck with your quilt!

  10. #10
    Super Member Ariannaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    in the sticks of PA
    Posts
    1,952
    Quote Originally Posted by NZquilter View Post
    I would do a tight (about 13-15 stitches per inch) basting stitch 1/8 from the edge along the bias, taking as much care as possible not to stretch it. I don't know if you were planning on a border too, but I would put one, even if it's just narrow, to help stabilize it. With care it will work.
    No, this quilt pattern does not call for any borders. At this point I don't know if the basting stitch is going to matter.
    Maria
    Always be true to yourself!

  11. #11
    Super Member Ariannaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    in the sticks of PA
    Posts
    1,952
    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    Have you already cut them? If not then put a row of stay stitching on all the bias edges before cutting them. If they are already cut, I might cut strips of tissue paper and stitch, stay stitching along the edges through the tissue paper. If you pin the bias edges to the paper, you will be able to tell if they are moving and correct them. Bias edges are not that difficult to manage if you use lots of pins and can pin them to a straight edge or border.
    Yes the fabric is already cut, like I said I was getting ready to attach the setting triangles when I discovered the problem.
    Maria
    Always be true to yourself!

  12. #12
    Super Member Ariannaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    in the sticks of PA
    Posts
    1,952
    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
    Can you post a link to the pattern?

    I would ignore the instructions and cut the triangles so that the straight of grain is on the outside edges.
    It's too late the fabric is already cut. I really don't know how to post links but like I said it is on Moda bake shop.com. The pattern is called Square Dance by Amanda Wilbert. Please look at it and then you will see the problem.
    Maria
    Always be true to yourself!

  13. #13
    Super Member Ariannaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    in the sticks of PA
    Posts
    1,952
    Quote Originally Posted by dunster View Post
    Making a square and cutting two diagonals is the correct way to make setting triangles so that the straight of grain (not the bias) is on the outside edge. I think your pattern is correct, and you shouldn't have any problem with the sewing if you're careful not to stretch the bias edges while you're sewing them to the interior blocks of the quilt. The corner triangles are made by cutting only one diagonal through a square of a different size. Look at the pattern again and see if this makes sense to you.
    It does make sense Dunster, but the problem is that the biased edges don't attach to any other element. I'm going to try to upload a picture.
    Maria
    Always be true to yourself!

  14. #14
    Super Member Ariannaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    in the sticks of PA
    Posts
    1,952
    Hopefully here is a picture of the problem.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Maria
    Always be true to yourself!

  15. #15
    Super Member Ariannaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    in the sticks of PA
    Posts
    1,952
    I didn't mark on the picture before uploading but as you can see the setting triangles are all biased edges and I don't have enough fabric to redo it. The thing I don't understand is how she didn't realize what she was doing. I am just hoping that my quilt comes out as flat and pretty as hers did. Thanks to everyone who responded I did try to attach some interfacing on a smaller piece of the fabric on the diagonal and because I was trying to do it on what I already had done it did not work. I hope that makes sense.
    Maria
    Always be true to yourself!

  16. #16
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    kansas
    Posts
    5,226
    Blog Entries
    37
    use starch--lots of it. And be very careful pressing (let the starch dry first). Then when all together, carefully baste around the edges--you will want to be sure to support the quilt well so it doesn't stretch from weight. When I put a similar one of mine on the LA I did have to restarch and steam to shrink the places where it was wavey.

  17. #17
    Super Member Maureen NJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Morris Plains, NJ
    Posts
    1,646
    Blog Entries
    1
    I went to look at the pattern. Nice pattern. You have nothing to worry about. The edges will be on the straight and cross grain, bias in the center.
    Name:  25BF949B-0055-445C-AB5C-4025C6A5B4DB.jpeg
Views: 1027
Size:  64.2 KB

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    34
    I did it the wrong way and used single cut squares (Figure A) instead of double cut (Figure B) as setting triangles. The hypotenuse (that goes to the outside) is on the bias in Figure A, but on the straight in Figure B.

    It does take some imagining, but draw an imaginary red line along the straight edge (or put a pin, if you need to do it in real life), and follow where that ends up on your quilt.

  19. #19
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    6,747
    I have done it with bias edges, and as long as you are careful pressing, it's not a problem.

    I seriously do not understand why so may people think bias is something to be afraid of and avoided.

    The border (inner and outer) was done with ombre fabric cut on the bias and there are no waves in it. And I do not use starch so it's very possible to do. I rarely worry about the bias edge on any setting triangle. I don't think I've ever cut super large squares and cut them double.

    My name is Cathy - and I'm addicted to old sewing machines and their attachments.

  20. #20
    Super Member NZquilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    3,306
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Macybaby View Post
    I seriously do not understand why so may people think bias is something to be afraid of and avoided...
    I totally agree with you.
    We didn't realize we were making memories, we just knew we were having fun. ~ Winnie the Pooh ~

    1912 World's Rotary Treadle (White Company), 1942 Singer 66-16, 1952 Pfaff 130-6, 1954 Singer 15-91, 1956 Singer 201-2

  21. #21
    Super Member Cheesehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin-Alabama Gulf Coast Snow Bird
    Posts
    1,800
    Macybaby your "Oh my gosh" quilt is gorgeous! How long did it take to make this beauty?

  22. #22
    Super Member Ariannaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    in the sticks of PA
    Posts
    1,952
    Thanks everyone crisis averted I was wrong the bias is not on the outside such a relief! Hopefully will post a picture when it's complete.
    Maria
    Always be true to yourself!

  23. #23
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    22,729
    Quote Originally Posted by Ariannaquilts View Post
    Thanks everyone crisis averted I was wrong the bias is not on the outside such a relief! Hopefully will post a picture when it's complete.
    Hope you can breathe more easily now -

  24. #24
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    6,390
    A lovely quilt!

  25. #25
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    18

    Try painter's tape

    If you haven't started sewing yet, you can add some 2" painter's tape close to the bias edge on wrong side of the fabric. Don't sew on the tape but place it really close to your needle - I usually let my metal foot run on the tape. Just lay tape down on the fabric in one piece - you don't want to re-position it because of the stretch. The tape will help keep your edge from stretching and if you sew with a short stitch it should be fine.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.