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Thread: How do you make a tee-shirt quilt

  1. #1
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
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    How do you make a tee-shirt quilt

    My daughter's boss has over 20 tee-shirts and wants to make a quilt with them. I am thinking about offering my services and doing it for him as he's never sewn before. But...I know nothing about making this kind of quilt. How do I make the tee-shirts stiff enough to sew pieces of them together. Is it a hassle to make a tee-shirt quilt? It might be too much trouble to help him out. I need to know what I'm getting into before I offer to tackle this job. I've made many, many quilts, so I know how to quilt, but this is totally out of my comfort zone.
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
    Strong people don't put others down...they build them up."
    "Remember that your instincts are more important than rules"

  2. #2
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    there are tons of t-shirt quilt patterns on the market and many tutorials - and u-tube videos---just do a search- but
    easy explanation-
    cut out decals/designs for shirts, press a lightweight fusable stablizer/interfacing to the back of each one- lay them out the way you like them- add sashings/blocks to create a quilt top- sew it all together- quilt & bind. the key is the fusable interfacing (which controls the stretch)
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  3. #3
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    Saw lady at quilt show that used an iron on fusable stabilizer that had a grid on it. You fused the cutout part of tshirt, ironed on, ironed on next one, etc., did not cut apart. Then you sewed the seams together, still all in one piece. She had put in sashing. Not explaining it right, but looked so easy. I'm sure you could find technique on net somewhere. It was like making the Lone Star on a fusable.

  4. #4
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
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    Thanks. You answered my question. I need fusible stabilizer! I can do that.
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
    Strong people don't put others down...they build them up."
    "Remember that your instincts are more important than rules"

  5. #5
    Power Poster Mariposa's Avatar
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    **Do use fusible NON-WOVEN interfacing.** It really helps to control any stretching issues.
    Be a blessing to others, as you may entertain angels unaware!

  6. #6
    Junior Member coffeebreak's Avatar
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    I just made ones for my two grand daughters...one is 12 and the other is 6. I started 4 years ago collecting t's that "meant" something to them...their favorite T for some reason. They both were in the Hanna Montana era so each has their fav HM tee. They both loved Dinosaurs, so there is one of those there. THe oldest was in girl scouts and a T they made while at Sea World. She loved marine life so there is the Aquarium of the Pacific and other things/places she loved in her early years of life! The younger one..a little harder as I only had 4 years to collect, and I had to use fabric instead for some of her likes, but her first one was "everyone loves a blued eyed girl" and that is there and so on.

    I cut the front of the tee's 9 inch square. I did iron on interface them so they didn't unravel. I then Appliqued the 9" t to a 12 inch block. And from there...just normal sashing to attach all the blocks. They both turned out perfect. I also used a fleece backing...the oldest one says "ROCK" and has guitars and curly-q's and the younger one loved Tinkerbell so that was the backing for hers.

    I know some doing adult size t's just cut the whole front out and sash them together. I have not done that way as I don't like working with double knit in any fashion (including wearing it!!!) So if that is how you want to do it, I can't help you there! But this is how I did the little ones T's.

    Both are 65x65 in size...about twin bed size, give or take! I didn't do them with measurements in mind other than the size of the main block (12x12) and the sashings I made just to make it all look right.
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  7. #7
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by coffeebreak View Post
    I just made ones for my two grand daughters...one is 12 and the other is 6. I started 4 years ago collecting t's that "meant" something to them...their favorite T for some reason. They both were in the Hanna Montana era so each has their fav HM tee. They both loved Dinosaurs, so there is one of those there. THe oldest was in girl scouts and a T they made while at Sea World. She loved marine life so there is the Aquarium of the Pacific and other things/places she loved in her early years of life! The younger one..a little harder as I only had 4 years to collect, and I had to use fabric instead for some of her likes, but her first one was "everyone loves a blued eyed girl" and that is there and so on.

    I cut the front of the tee's 9 inch square. I did iron on interface them so they didn't unravel. I then Appliqued the 9" t to a 12 inch block. And from there...just normal sashing to attach all the blocks. They both turned out perfect. I also used a fleece backing...the oldest one says "ROCK" and has guitars and curly-q's and the younger one loved Tinkerbell so that was the backing for hers.

    I know some doing adult size t's just cut the whole front out and sash them together. I have not done that way as I don't like working with double knit in any fashion (including wearing it!!!) So if that is how you want to do it, I can't help you there! But this is how I did the little ones T's.

    Both are 65x65 in size...about twin bed size, give or take! I didn't do them with measurements in mind other than the size of the main block (12x12) and the sashings I made just to make it all look right.
    I really like your quilts. I think I like the idea of appliqueing the blocks to bigger blocks after I add interfacing to the back of them. I think I can work that way. Thanks for the idea! I think I'll help my daughter's boss after all. Again, thanks.
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
    Strong people don't put others down...they build them up."
    "Remember that your instincts are more important than rules"

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