Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 25 of 25

Thread: How do you make your quilting designs on quilts????

  1. #1
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Ashdown, AR
    Posts
    9,645
    Blog Entries
    1

    How do you make your quilting designs on quilts????

    I have been doing a lot of research on how to make quilting designs on quilts. My free motion leaves a lot to be desired. So, I need to find an alternative method to use while I Hone my skills. I have seen many different techniques for transferring the pattern on the top. Which one you do use? And, what kind? I tried using tissue paper (not a pretty experience) And, I bought the POUNCE. )(haven't tried it yet) Anuy suggestions???
    Be the best that you can be at everything you do.
    Find me on Facebook Be my friend Join my group
    Leesa Kemp's Material Things Fabric Sales and Auctions

  2. #2
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Clay Springs AZ
    Posts
    3,228
    Pounce works best if you rub a damp cloth over the area first. It helps hold the chalk in place.
    I use stencils since Im not good at freehand. I like the ones with mesh instead of cut outs.
    Just bought a roll of paper with stipples on it. Thought this would be a good way to train myself to do them later freehand.
    The golden paper rolls are a good way to transfer patterns by just needle punching the pattern into layers of paper.
    By doing stitch in the ditch for the middle of a quilt then using a pattern for the borders you get good practice.
    The borders are the easiest since you dont have all the bulk to deal with.

  3. #3
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Outside St. Louis
    Posts
    29,682
    I just do a large stipple, very easy and I love the look and love doing it.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  4. #4
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    5,784
    pounce, golden threads , and chalk pencils, have used all 3 just fine for practice and small projects there are also rolls of designa like stipples made easy on paper ready for you to try, keepsake quilting sells them
    Brother (XL-3500i, CV3550, SQ-9050, Dreamweaver XE6200D), Juki MO-2000QVP, Handiquilter Avante

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Southwest Florida
    Posts
    382
    I bought a special pencil at a quilt shop, but it took too much pressure to make any marks on the fabric. Didn't like it at all. Consequently, I just eye it up as best I can now and stick to simple designs I can't screw up too much. Of course, I don't do the elaborae quilts I used to make anymore, so I don't need fancy designs on them. Been there, done that, and now I just make simple usable quilts.

  6. #6
    Super Member feline fanatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    9,000
    For LAQ, my go to marking tool are the blue water soluble markers or the purple air erase ones. These work best when I have made a template for myself or I am transferring a design using my overhead projector. Test first, of course. These are great for light colored fabrics. For dark I like to use the ceramic mechanical pencil, like the Fons and Porter one, but the mark rubs off easily. I have marked a quilt with it, loaded it on my rack and by the time I got to that area of the quilt the mark was too faint to see to quilt by. Luckily I could still see it enough to retrace over it again with the pencil.

    For transferring stencils I use a pounce pad. Remember you do not "pounce" the pad but rub it across your stencil as though you were erasing a chalk board. As Rose Marie noted the chalk line tends to bounce away as you quilt and what was a fine sharp line ends up being a blurry wide mark. I have only used the regular pounce chalk, not the ultimate you have to iron to get the mark out. So I can't say what the ultimate does. Like Rose Marie, I tend to dampen my surface prior to marking. I have heard, but not yet tried, that hairspray also works for setting the chalk and the marks will wash out. Don't think I would test that on a client quilt but would on one of my own.

    I have also used the Clover chaco liner. But only white. I have had the blue embed in my thread and not come out.

    Here is a link to a post I did some time ago showing my steps in deciding motif and marking a quilt, but I don't need to mark much. For example with feathers, I only need to mark my spine. http://www.quiltingboard.com/picture...r-t121493.html

  7. #7
    Super Member donnalynett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    1,317
    I use tracing paper.....trace the design on the sheet of paper, sew it with no thread and then use it to use as your guide to making more. I just stack several sheets of paper and use my original to sew with no thread and then pin those sheets in place on the quilt. It is a lot easier to use than tissue paper.

  8. #8
    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    9,846
    Blog Entries
    31
    Every style of marking works for different types of quilting. I use Goldenthread paper on small quilts. I love using the pounce on large quilts And the tip about dampening the fabric first is one I am eager to try. Some quilts I just FMQ.

    I also use the purple disappearing ink pens for marking but test it first.

    the new pens (frixion) never used them, yet.

    My least favorite method is using a chalk pencil. I don't know if I'm not using it the right way but it always seems to drag on the fabric and never leaves a good enough mark to follow.

    Try them all out on some sample fabric Then pick and choose the ones you like.
    peace
    Last edited by ube quilting; 12-03-2012 at 02:26 PM.
    no act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. Aesop

  9. #9
    Super Member LivelyLady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Western MA
    Posts
    2,695
    I do stippling and for certain designs, I use frixion pens on light fabric and a sliver of soap on dark fabric.
    When you sleep under a quilt, you sleep under a blanket of love.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Thornton, Colorado
    Posts
    961
    I do FMQ most of the time. Sometimes I stand in front of the machine, trying to decide what type of design I want to do. Inspiration comes from books on machine quilting, pictures of quits, lots of doodling on paper and so on. Sometimes I take a piece of clear vinyl plastic and put it on the quilt top and use dry erase markers to "audtion" design ideas. They can be erased. Caution: put a colored tape around the edges so you don't run off the edge and accidently mark the fabric.

  11. #11
    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    6,006
    I have read before that the Glad Press and Seal is one way to put the dsign on quilt. I just ordered the pounce also and waiting for my box cyber Monday to arrive. I am in the same situation as you #1 piecemaker. I hope I can learn FMQ soon also. Good Luck to you and let us see your results, please.
    Suzanne
    Asking a seamstress to mend is like asking Picasso to paint your garage.

  12. #12
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Knot Merrill, Southern Indiana
    Posts
    5,736
    I like the Golden thread paper and what I do is to spray the back of the paper with 505 - let it dry to a tack - then stick it to the quilt top. It stays put but will bend and curve with the quilt. Yes the top can be a little tacky when you pull the paper off but not too bad (which is why I spray the paper not the quilt!), and it does come off in the wash.
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  13. #13
    Senior Member gail-r's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Tooele, Utah
    Posts
    364
    I use frixion pens on light fabric, love them because you can make very small lines, they come right off with heat. I just use my steam iron and steam only and press. Use bounce pad on dark fabrics or chalk pens. Pens seem to rub off easily.
    Gail in Utah

  14. #14
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    4,118
    I either draw directly onto the quilt with a ceramic pencil or quilt without any markings. You get better with practice and it is less work and neater result.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    770
    I like Borders by the Roll (or something like that), available from Keepsake. They are pre-printed and tear away easily. The same company makes Stipples by the Roll.

  16. #16
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Ashdown, AR
    Posts
    9,645
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks for all the good advice and information. I'm going shopping!!
    Be the best that you can be at everything you do.
    Find me on Facebook Be my friend Join my group
    Leesa Kemp's Material Things Fabric Sales and Auctions

  17. #17
    Super Member JNCT14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    CT New Haven County
    Posts
    1,495
    To me the worst part of FMQ is drawing the design on the quilt. Not only that I tried every market under the sun with mixed results. So my methods are these: I use the chalk pencils from JoAnns, making sure to keep the points sharp. I make sure that I have 2 colors on hand - one for light fabrics and one for dark. Then I mark the design in sections on my quilt as I go - working on one section at a time, about 18" x 18" sections. For the design, I either free draw it (feathers, hearts, flowers) or if the design is a little more complex, I make a template out of a cardboard cereal box. I don't worry too much about being completely exact because you really don't see the inaccuracies when the quilt is done. This way I do not stress about marking the entire quilt at once and the FMQ is mangeable on my midarm machine.

  18. #18
    Super Member rosiewell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Benicia, Ca
    Posts
    2,096
    I use stencils (the plastic ones) I have an extensive collection as I used to handquilt everything, I use a white quilting pencil for dark fabric and a yellow one for light. Works really well and by the time I am done the marking have just about disappeared

  19. #19
    Senior Member maryb44662's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Central VA
    Posts
    404
    Quote Originally Posted by #1piecemaker View Post
    I have been doing a lot of research on how to make quilting designs on quilts. My free motion leaves a lot to be desired. So, I need to find an alternative method to use while I Hone my skills. I have seen many different techniques for transferring the pattern on the top. Which one you do use? And, what kind? I tried using tissue paper (not a pretty experience) And, I bought the POUNCE. )(haven't tried it yet) Anuy suggestions???
    I use waxed paper to draw my designs onto then pin to area that I want to free motion following the lines. Works fine for me especially on the borders.
    MaryB

  20. #20
    Senior Member happyquiltmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    564
    I use the mechanical ceramic pencils. We sell Sewline at the shop. They're interchangeable...I own one pencil and refills of all the other colors.
    Cindy

    Curator of an 1889 Singer model 27 Fiddlebase Treadle, a 1951 Singer Centennial Featherweight, a 1956 Singer 401A, and a 1982 Bernina 830 Record.

  21. #21
    Super Member Pat625's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    1,640
    I use a lot of stencils..For those and free hand designs I use plain old cheap chalk sticks..I mark areas at a time so it doesn't wear off before I get to it

  22. #22
    Super Member JeanieG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Camarillo, CA
    Posts
    4,054
    I have had good luck tracing designs on Press 'n Seal with a fine point Sharpie. Put the Press 'n Seal on your quilt and quilt on the line. The Press 'n Seal will pull off easily when your done. Costco has 2 large rolls that are pretty reasonable.
    "You have enough quilts made when your soul is filled, your creativity satisfied and your fingers just won't work anymore."

  23. #23
    Super Member chuckbere15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Madison Heights, MI
    Posts
    1,091
    Blog Entries
    4
    I haven't tried it yet, but I saw a tutorial where you make your design on paper. Then take toole and trace the design with permanent marker. Then place on your quilt and with a chalk marker trace over the toole.
    The Quilting Bear

  24. #24
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    2,924
    If a quilt is loaded onto a frame, I like to use chalk--either the Ultimate in the pounce (white on dark fabrics, white mixed with blacklight chalk for light fabrics--turn the lights off and the blacklight on and the marks look fluorescent green) or a chalk wheel. I also use a product called Miracle Film, made by Marathon (they make great threads, too). It is a clear perforated plastic sheet which comes in a roll. I mark my design on the smooth side of it with a permanent thin-line Sharpie, allow to dry overnight (or cheat and dry it with my hairdryer) so the black doesn't transfer to the fabric. Spray the rougher backside of the Miracle Film lightly with a temporary spray adhesive and apply to the quilt top. Stitch through and tear the film away. I find it tears away very easily, much easier than Golden Threads paper. It is designed to be a heat-away stabilizer---you are to hold a hot iron over it, not touching it, and the product just balls up and you can brush it off. But it tears away so easily I have never had to do that. The only place tiny bits may get stuck is in areas which have been quilted heavily and you have to try to remove tiny slivers from between stitching lines. When that happens I use a hemostat if my fingernails can't get it. There's another heat- away stabilizer made by another well-known company whose name escapes me right now, which also works equally well, but it's a bit more expensive than Miracle Film.

  25. #25
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Ashdown, AR
    Posts
    9,645
    Blog Entries
    1
    I am learning just how inventive quilters are. Some of your suggestions and ways of doing things are so simple. I can't wait to try them out. Thanks so much. Keep them coming.
    Be the best that you can be at everything you do.
    Find me on Facebook Be my friend Join my group
    Leesa Kemp's Material Things Fabric Sales and Auctions

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.