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Thread: How do you secure applique on a well loved quilt

  1. #1
    Senior Member Chester the bunny's Avatar
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    How do you secure applique on a well loved quilt

    The only applique I've done has been on a wall hanging. I'm quilting a quilt that has applique that others have done and I am not sure if they would survive many washes. They seem to be OK but I wondered if those of you who do a lot of applique if you run a stitch all the way around each piece (say 1/8") to secure it or just treat it as you would the rest of the piecing?
    (It is needle turned hand applique)
    Nobody made a greater mistake than he who did nothing because he could only do a little.
    Edmund Burke

  2. #2
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    I treat it as the rest of the piecing, adding quilting where appropriate to the design, or to keep the applique from puffing out in the center if it is a larger piece . I would never stitch around the inside of hand applique. I would launder it carefully, as I do all quilts.

  3. #3
    Super Member crafty pat's Avatar
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    I just do a blanket stitch all around my applique and I have never had to quilt over or around it and it has always stayed in place after many washings.

  4. #4
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    ​Needle turn appliqué is quite sturdy if it is done well. I would not machine stitch on hand appliqué.

  5. #5
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    Maybe you could post a close-up picture of it? Then better/more accurate advice could be given.

    Just yesterday, I just saw a wall hanging that each block had been made by a different person. Some pieces looked very "secure" - some looked like it was good that it was a wall hanging and not a child's drag-around quilt.

  6. #6
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Speak directly to whomever you are doing the work for and tell them of your concerns.
    Have your suggestions ready .... and let them choose how it would be best quilted.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  7. #7
    Senior Member Chester the bunny's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone for your input. This quilt will be for me so I can wash it gently. The stitches on the appliques look pretty good …. there may be a few corners that could be an issue. There are so many leaves …. It's this project that I am finally getting around to quilting https://www.quiltingboard.com/pictur...p-t291141.html
    I will just sew a stem in each leaf.
    I just had concerns because I have never used a quilt that had applique on it before.
    Thanks again.
    Nobody made a greater mistake than he who did nothing because he could only do a little.
    Edmund Burke

  8. #8
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
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    I do lots of applique quilts and always talk to the owner about the amount of quilting needed on the applique. Rule of thumb is I try to stay off the applique as much as possible--I quilt around it,and will only quilt on it if it's too big for the bat requirements and then just minimally. On occasion I have someone ask me to quilt more on the applique cause it's "lose".

  9. #9
    Super Member nanna-up-north's Avatar
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    When I read the first post I think you're asking about how to quilt this quilt with the applique leaves. Is that correct?

    I do a lot of needle turn applique and I've hand quilted one, machine quilted the others. In either case, I don't want the quilting to go through the applique. I quilt around each applique piece so it will 'pop' out and show up well. So, yes, I stitch as close to the applique piece as I can. That's often about 1/8" away.

    If that's not what you were asking, I'm sorry I wasn't much help.
    --- Jean

    jdquilts123.blogspot.com

  10. #10
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    When I do applique, I use an invisible stitch, starting at the edge of the applique and running it under the fabric. Then, I come through the fabric very close to the edge, and go back down through the piece. The result is that my applique "floats" on the surface and no stitches show. I learned this technique through taking a class with Pat Campbell. It is sturdy and has held up well through the years.

  11. #11
    Member ByThePiece's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chester the bunny View Post
    The only applique I've done has been on a wall hanging. I'm quilting a quilt that has applique that others have done and I am not sure if they would survive many washes. They seem to be OK but I wondered if those of you who do a lot of applique if you run a stitch all the way around each piece (say 1/8") to secure it or just treat it as you would the rest of the piecing?
    (It is needle turned hand applique)
    When I first read this, I remembered an old trick a Georgia Quilter taught me years ago. It may not apply in this question but is a handy hint for some occasions. Often on older quilts one or two squares or part of a quilt may look more vulnerable to wear and washing. I was told buy some bridal veil or even netting and secure it over the area by whatever sewing or tacking will hold it in place. (I was repairing squares). I didn't believe it but it disappeared and was strong and held everything in. If not applicable here, keep in mind for future when you might need it. I love this board and laugh at some and admire some and love your love of animals and each other. Gabrielle
    DON'T BREED OR BUY, WHILE SHELTER PETS DIE!
    "Each of us can only do the best we can for as many as we can and that will never be good enough for those of us who care!"

  12. #12
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    Your quilt reminds me of what I was told long ago. Back in the way back when, they didn't wash quilts like we do today. Line drying took a long long time which could lead to mildew. Gentle washing is best. I gave a quilt to my sister who washed it to death. She mentioned it was falling apart. Well she washed it like sheets on the bed. It couldn't hold up to the machine.

  13. #13
    Super Member d.rickman's Avatar
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    This is exactly what I gave done on those quilts that need a bit of TLC, and it helps keep the quilt pieces intact and the smaller the voile (Netting), the better it works.

    You are best to use lanolin soap, it only takes a couple of capfuls to do a washing machine tub of warm water, put in your quilt and soak for 20-30 minutes, do not rinse or adjitate the wash cycle. turn the machine onto spin,once finished - hang to dry or lay flat - leave in the lanolin soap, it helps your batting retain it shape and not come apart and ruin the quilt.
    Quilting People are the Best, Have a great sewing day!
    DonnaJ

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