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Thread: how to quilt a twin bed size Dresden plate?

  1. #1
    Junior Member seazteddy's Avatar
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    how to quilt a twin bed size Dresden plate?

    It is too big to go through my sewing machine throat. So tie but tie what? I have sashing around each block.

  2. #2
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    I made a twin sized Dresden plate a few years ago and quilted it on my old Viking Rose. I outlined the plate and its fans, then the center of the plate and then stippled between them. I found I had to baste very well with my Viking but it worked OK. Just take it slowly.

  3. #3
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    A twin size should fit into a 6" small throat. Just remember you only have to get 1/4 of the quilt into the throat if you freemotion. Just start in the center and puddle in the throat. The quilt can fit on top of your right hand as you sew. But if you decide to tie it. I would tie every 6 inches apart wherever it hits on the pattern.

  4. #4
    Junior Member seazteddy's Avatar
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    I have no idea how to do this. I could get under the throat but I don''t know how to be able to move it around to outline the plate, etc.

  5. #5
    Super Member SusieQOH's Avatar
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    You may want to check out some Youtube videos on this. Lots of people quilt on regular machines.

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    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    slowly and using a walking foot would be how I would do it. regular sewing but the walking foot allows you to turn it a bit for curves if you want. watch some videos on doing this and it might help. It's not as daunting as it sounds.
    "From hence only infer that an Englishman, of all men, ought not to despise foreigners as such and I think the inference is just, since what they are today, we were yesterday, and tomorrow they will be like us"
    Daniel De Foe -The True Englishman

  7. #7
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    I just used my domestic machine to quilt a twin. First I pin-basted well. Then I used wash-away thread to anchor the blocks, which allowed me to remove the pins. Then I quilted using my walking foot. It takes practice to move the quilt around, so I do a lot of stopping and starting. It took me two weeks to finish quilting but I'm happy with the result. I quilted a medallion quilt two summers ago using my domestic machine - it took a month. So don't expect to finish as fast as a long armer would. Take it easy. And, of course, the final "product" is completely different looking.

  8. #8
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    "From hence only infer that an Englishman, of all men, ought not to despise foreigners as such and I think the inference is just, since what they are today, we were yesterday, and tomorrow they will be like us"
    Daniel De Foe -The True Englishman

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    I tied a quilt that I was afraid of destroying by attempting FMQ. My quilt was modern and had lots of white space, so I didn't want the ties to distract from the pattern. I did the ties from the back in a neutral crochet cotton, there were only small x's on the front and the tails were on the back. I chose a pattern 6 inches apart with the next row offset by 3 inches -a diamond pattern which satisfied the batting requirements. It was a fast process and the result looked great.

  10. #10
    Super Member NZquilter's Avatar
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    I've done twin size quilts in 5" throat space, before I bought my vintage Singer with 7" throat space. Try to get your work space behind the machine and to your left as big as possible. When I was a teenager I had a tiny cheap Brother sewing machine (I loved it!) and would quilt at our huge 12 seater dinning table. Plenty of space! Basting every 4" on a grid helped me too. It's doable.

    Marti Michell has written a book and published a Craftsy Class for machine quilting large quilts in small machines. https://www.google.com/search?q=mart...=silk&ie=UTF-8 . It might be helpful to look into it.
    We didn't realize we were making memories, we just knew we were having fun. ~ Winnie the Pooh ~

    1912 World's Rotary Treadle (White Company), 1942 Singer 66-16, 1952 Pfaff 130-6, 1954 Singer 15-91, 1956 Singer 201-2

  11. #11
    Super Member roguequilter's Avatar
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    before the internet it was do as well as possible and learn from mistakes, then keep going forward. my first fmq on my domestic with 7 1/2" throat was a struggle. kept at it, developed ideas that worked. since then i've lost track of how many quilts, large and small, i've done on domestic machine. now we all have youtube ..almost as good as the books i taught myself to quilt from
    the rogue quilter - in from wandering in the sun and snow with camera in hand.

  12. #12
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    Actually, you should not have a problem quilting a twin size on your domestic machine. I am doing a queen size one right now. That is a bit of a struggle. I approach the project in quadrants on the quilt except borders. That way I have less to manage. I do the borders as a fifth unit because I want them to appear without interruption. They are easy to handle because the rest is already quilted. I do think being organized is the key to success.

  13. #13
    Super Member hobbykat1955's Avatar
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    I've done a Full size and outlined it's Dresden...This thing is so heavy it sits because I won't use it due to weight so probably end up in a donation bin. I'll know better if there's a next time to just make a small wall hanging.

  14. #14
    Junior Member seazteddy's Avatar
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    It is now in a UFO bag.

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