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Thread: How should I....

  1. #1
    Super Member EagarBeez's Avatar
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    I have fabric, that I had stored in plastic containers. Some I placed in small baggies, left open for air. I have been reading that this is not a good way to store fabric. I moved it to a some closed drawers.
    Where I live, we get lots of dust. High desert. How do you all feel I would be better storing fabric?

  2. #2
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    This is a good question. I am curious as to the answer, also. On another post, I think someone said use cotton pillow cases. I wonder if there is anything else out there. Maybe pillow cases and closed bookcases.

  3. #3
    Super Member shequilts's Avatar
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    My pal who owns a quilt shop had some old samples stored in plastic tubs. They molded! No idea where the moisture came from. She now stores everything in cotton pillow cases. She buys cheap, white, cotton ones from the dollar store.

  4. #4
    Super Member KatFish's Avatar
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    I store mine in those plastic boxes. My sewing room has lots of light, so storing it in the boxes keeps it from fading. I also have a wood furnace and we have dust everywhere from it. So the boxes keep my fabric dust free. I have no idea how storing it in the plasic will longterm affect it, but I worry more about the damage from fading and the dust.

  5. #5
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    I know there are things you can buy to keep closets dry, and most pill bottles come with small bags of whatever it is that keeps them from moisture.

    Seems that somewhere I saw some bags of a chemical that would keep tightly closed plastic containers dry and mold free. Can't remember where at this time. Brain fog....

    Should anyone find this, please let us all know.

  6. #6
    Power Poster sueisallaboutquilts's Avatar
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    I have had fabric in plastic totes for years and have had no problems with it.

  7. #7
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    I would be more concerned storing the fabric in a wood drawer where the fabric touches the wood. Over time it can stain the fabrics.

    I store in plastic tubs, I pull them out and check them periodically, and haven't had any problems yet :D:D:D

  8. #8
    Super Member PurplePassion's Avatar
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    I have stored fabric in plastic totes for years; never had a problem with it ; except the cover not fitting tightly on some. But I visit them often to check on them.

  9. #9
    Super Member katiebear1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sueisallaboutquilts
    I have had fabric in plastic totes for years and have had no problems with it.
    Mine are stored in plastic totes under the daybed in my sewing room. I haven't had a problem , but I usually leave the lids askew so they get air.

  10. #10
    deema's Avatar
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    I store my fabric in a long shallow plastic bin with wheels. It slides nicely under my cutting table. The lid folds up in the middle to allow easy access to either end of the bin, and its so stuffed full that the lid pushes up in the middle a bit and allows air circulation.

  11. #11
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    if you have air or heat on most of the time it should keep the humidity at bay, make sure nothing is the least bit damp when you put it in those plastic tubs. I live in the extremely humid south Texas, when I was a kid we didn't have a/c and food and laundry were always mildewing and molding, life is better now!

  12. #12
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
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    I store in plastic bins with very loose fitting lids. I do live in a dry area and the bins are in the house. I do take them out often to play. LOL I did have more problems with storing in drawers eventhough I lined them. There were lines on the creases with some fabrics.

  13. #13
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PurplePassion
    I have stored fabric in plastic totes for years; never had a problem with it ; except the cover not fitting tightly on some. But I visit them often to check on them.
    Hehehehe On the visiting. It seems my fabrics get to see my face atleast monthly if not more frequently.

  14. #14
    Super Member Mariah's Avatar
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    Pillowslips work well for me. They keep out the dust, and are easy to use. Also the white tissue paper; just wrap fabric in it.
    Mariah.

  15. #15
    Super Member cbridges22's Avatar
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    I store mine in a cabinet.It is Formica so no worries about coming in contact with wood.I shut the doors to keep light out.Air circulates so I don't worry about mold.

  16. #16
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    Mine is stored (for moving) in plastic bins. I'm considering drilling a few small holes in the sides of the bins just for air circulation, as they will stay in the bins once I get moved. I previously just had them stored on open shelves, but we all know that isn't a good idea. I had some fading and dust to contend with.

    First time I've ever had so much organization to my fabric. :-)

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramona Byrd
    I know there are things you can buy to keep closets dry, and most pill bottles come with small bags of whatever it is that keeps them from moisture.

    Seems that somewhere I saw some bags of a chemical that would keep tightly closed plastic containers dry and mold free. Can't remember where at this time. Brain fog....

    Should anyone find this, please let us all know.
    It is called silica and your shoes will also mold and finish will get sticky and come off if left in boxes of any kind (per Brown shoe group Naurlizer shoes)

  18. #18
    Super Member jljack's Avatar
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    We live in the relatively dry Central Valley of CA. I have had fabric in plastic zip top bags for over 4 years, and it's fine. However, I have heard of problems with moisture build up in other climates. Moisture eats fabrics. I also store on open shelves. Since I wash all my fabrics before cutting, any dust that has accumulated washes away. But there's not much at all.

  19. #19
    Super Member leiladylei54's Avatar
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    I store all my fabrics in plastic storage bins and then the bins are placed in a metal storage shed. With Hawaii's high humidity, this still works without mildew so far. I've stored some of the fabrics in these bins and storage shed for years and they still look good.

  20. #20
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
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    Mine are stored in plastic tote but I visit with them often so they seem to be OK.

  21. #21
    Super Member brendadawg's Avatar
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    You can also put one of those little packets that comes in a shoebox with a new pair of shoes.

  22. #22
    Super Member teacherbailey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sueisallaboutquilts
    I have had fabric in plastic totes for years and have had no problems with it.
    Me too! Even have some in the garage. It ends up smelling musty after a few years but it's quite usable after washing.

  23. #23
    Super Member Deborah12687's Avatar
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    Why not toss silica jell packs in the bottom of the tote. They will keep the moister out of the totes.

  24. #24
    Senior Member Zephyr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shequilts
    My pal who owns a quilt shop had some old samples stored in plastic tubs. They molded! No idea where the moisture came from. She now stores everything in cotton pillow cases. She buys cheap, white, cotton ones from the dollar store.
    That's a great idea. I had been buying pillowcases from those linen discount stores and they've gone out of business. Some times I have even given the quilt in a pillow case so it will get stored correctly.

  25. #25
    Super Member patdesign's Avatar
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    I have been storing in cedar chest for years till I ran out of space, no its plastic boxes with silica packets inside, never had mold, and I am in South Fla, HUMID! You could try wrapping individual pieces in white tissue such as comes with clothing, and storing on shelves. In order to identify, photocopy piece of fabric, on back side write the amount of fabric in cut, this way you don't have to unwrap to see or measure

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