Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 53

Thread: How to stop "folding" while quilting

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    35
    Blog Entries
    1

    How to stop "folding" while quilting

    Hello,

    I am working on a crib quilt for my grandson. Even though I pinned it real well, and am using a walking foot, I still get this:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20151213_140925_resized.jpg 
Views:	2920 
Size:	431.9 KB 
ID:	537967

    Any advice on how to avoid this? Besides going very slowly and using a stilletto?

    Thanks,
    Karen

  2. #2
    Senior Member cindi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Grove City, OH
    Posts
    843
    Try sewing with the blocks that have the least number of seams on TOP. If I'm sewing a two blocks together and one has 2 seams and one has four, the block with two pieces goes on top. You get better feed on the bottom than the top, IMHO.

  3. #3
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Corpus Christi, Tx.
    Posts
    15,971
    Blog Entries
    3
    Only thing I can think of is maybe pin lengthwise instead of crosswise?

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    35
    Blog Entries
    1
    I see what you mean but this was actually during the quilting process (top, batting, backing).
    Karen

  5. #5
    Super Member woody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    2,152
    Blog Entries
    1
    Maybe try spray basting. I have quilted up to a queen size bargello with my walking foot and didn't get a single pucker (fold).
    The biggest risk is the one not taken

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    35
    Blog Entries
    1
    That's the word I was looking for, pucker!

    Thanks, I assume you can get spray basting at Joann's in the quilting section?

    I should have added this is being quilted on a regular machine, not a long arm or short arm (I guess that's obvious by the picture).
    Last edited by kjackson; 12-13-2015 at 12:15 PM.
    Karen

  7. #7
    Super Member QuiltingVagabond's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    South Central Indiana
    Posts
    1,552
    Maybe if you start in the center of the quilt and stitch toward the outside edges? It would mean more starts (and thread tails) but might help with the crossing puckers.
    QuiltingVagabond aka Kathy

  8. #8
    Super Member rryder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Va.
    Posts
    3,832
    Is your walking foot a traditional walking foot with the arm that clamps over the needle bar or is it one of those new fangled ones that Bernina, Brother, etc. are now calling dual feed?

    It looks like your walking foot is pushing the top layer of fabric ahead of the bottom layer and batting.

    If it's a plain old fashioned walking foot I can think of several things that might cause the problem, either the walking foot is not properly installed, your feed dogs are not up, or it's possible that your presser foot pressure is too high. You might ask how I know these things LOL!

    First, make sure your feed dogs are up, then double check that the arm of your walking foot is over the needle bar so it is properly synchronized with the feed dogs. If those things are not the problem, then if your machine has a presser foot pressure adjustment try lowering the presser foot pressure.

    Rob

  9. #9
    Super Member tesspug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,968
    I find if I spread my hands out and push out that pucker I can avoid most of them. I watch to see if they're coming and try to ease the fabric back under the foot.
    I promise not to buy any more fabric until I see something I really like. Or it's on sale. Or I think it might match something.

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Tn
    Posts
    2,715
    I put my hands on the sides and put tension away from the needle. Also stop needle down every so often and lightly pull fabric in front of the needle toward me to release that pucker. Hope that makes sense and helps you

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    35
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks, Rob, it's one of the older ones with the arm that goes over the needle (what exactly does that arm do?)

    I will check all the things you mentioned and see if that helps at all.
    Karen

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    35
    Blog Entries
    1
    Yes it does make sense, I will try that.

    I haven't quilted anything in a long time and I think my skills need honing again. Maybe just more practice is necessary.
    Karen

  13. #13
    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    6,540
    It sounds like the pressure foot need to be lowered, then the fabric will be tighter not to move like that. I hope this helps.
    Suzanne
    Asking a seamstress to mend is like asking Picasso to paint your garage.

  14. #14
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    35,812
    I see it is happening as you try to sew over a already quilted verticle seam. Going over a quilting lines is always a tricky spot. I make a frame with my hands around the foot about a 6 inch circle with my Machinger gloves on. I kind of pull the quilt outwards with my hands as I sew and watch to make it smooths out any extra fabric. If you can't smooth out the surface before you get to the line, you are going to get a pleat or pucker. I try to choose other quilting designs that do not have bisecting lines for this very reason.

  15. #15
    Super Member kiffie2413's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    3,820
    Blog Entries
    1
    I also spray baste. But I only use 505 Basting Spray, as it doesn't gum up my needle, machine, thread, etc. I also haven't had any issues with my Lupus acting up from spraying it. I buy it at Sewforless.com, as that's the best price I've found.
    Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest~Mark Twain

  16. #16
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    177
    I also only use 505 spray. Best on the market

  17. #17
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    11,157
    Blog Entries
    2
    You said you pinned really well. You do need a lot of pins. You should be able to put your fist down anywhere on the pinned top and touch at least 2 pins. Also, if you start quilting from the middle out, you may have better results. and last, it looks like you are using a walking foot? make sure you have attached it correctly.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    SW Ontario
    Posts
    75
    As Rob said, lowering the presser foot pressure may help. It did for me and I have not had puckers since.

  19. #19
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    6,762
    I know it's not always posssible, but I find that when I do cross-hatching on the diagonal I rarely get puckers. Amd as Tartan said, pulling (stretching) the fabric out with both hands as you go will smooth things out pretty well. I am definitely no expert and still need lots of practice.
    One step at a time, always forward.

  20. #20
    Super Member rryder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Va.
    Posts
    3,832
    [QUOTE=kjackson;7402745]Thanks, Rob, it's one of the older ones with the arm that goes over the needle (what exactly does that arm do?)

    The arm that goes over the needle bar (actually over the screw that holds the needle clamp in place) causes the foot's moving parts to go up and down in time with the needle, so they act as feed dogs for the top layer of fabric. If the arm isn't placed over the needle clamp screw, then those parts don't work properly.

    Rob

  21. #21
    Super Member OhCanada's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Montreal Canada
    Posts
    1,111
    Blog Entries
    9
    A few things that I have found that really help avoid puckering during the quilting stage are:
    - iron the quilt top and backing well, and get the wrinkles out of the batting before spray baste, then take the time to really smooth out all 3 layers with your hands (gently)
    - start quilting in the center of the quilt, working your way towards the outside
    - check the back of the quilt frequently to make sure all 3 layers are smooth
    Valerie

  22. #22
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Southern USA
    Posts
    11,111
    Pin basting is drudge work for me. I use Elmer's school glue. That quilt top and backing aren't moving a smidgen. No puckers, wrinkles, or pleats.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
    Being cheap is not a badge of honor.
    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

  23. #23
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Mableton, GA
    Posts
    9,733
    Quote Originally Posted by Onebyone View Post
    Pin basting is drudge work for me. I use Elmer's school glue. That quilt top and backing aren't moving a smidgen. No puckers, wrinkles, or pleats.

    I agree with his. Also I does no gum up the needle. There is no odor involved m
    Alyce

  24. #24
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    35
    Blog Entries
    1
    You mean regular white Elmer's glue? Doesn't that gum up your machine? And do you wait for it to dry completely?
    Karen

  25. #25
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    12,953
    Blog Entries
    1
    What's happening is that the top layer is stretching as you sew. It doesn't become apparent until you have to cross another line of quilting; that's when the excess fabric that has accumulated in front of the presser foot turns into a tuck. Spray basting and glue basting help prevent this because, unlike pins, these provide the layers with continuous adhesion. Pins, in contrast, are connecting the three layers only at the pinned locations.

    One thing that helps a lot to prevent these tucks is starch. Since your quilt is already basted, what I would recommend is laying it out on a large flat sheet and adding layers of spray starch. You can use a fan to speed drying between layers. Starch both the backing and the top. Starch stabilizes the fabric so it is much less inclined to stretch as you sew.

    Next time you may want to spray starch the top before layering. It's also a good idea to heavily starch the backing before layering. I starch yardage with a 1:1 solution of Sta-Flo liquid laundry starch and water, "painting" this on with a large wall painting brush. I leave it for a few minutes to allow the fibers to absorb as much starch as they can, then toss in the dryer and iron with steam. This provides a much heavier stabilization than spray starch can offer. However, layers of spray starch can help a *lot* in a situation like this, where the quilt is already sandwiched.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.