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Thread: How would I cut this?

  1. #1
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    How would I cut this?

    I found this link (http://theconfusedquilter.blogspot.c...continues.html) to a wonderful blog on Pinterest. I'm in love with this block pattern as is my daughter. It would make a beautiful quilt for her in the colors that match her room. The blogger paper pieced the block, but I don't want to do that. I can see making long strips and cutting the triangles, then sewing them together. Is this the way others who don't want to paper piece the block would do it? I don't think it would be all that hard. What do you all think?

  2. #2
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    Also, does anyone know the name of this block?

  3. #3
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    I'm terrible with block names so no help for that, but the way you described making these blocks is how I'd do it, too. If your strip sets aren't symmetrical from top to bottom, each strip set would make 2 blocks - one set from the "pointing up" triangles and another from the "pointing down" triangles, if that makes any sense.

  4. #4
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    ditto ... you can make strip sets and then cut as SewNoma has suggested.

    One thing to consider ... in doing it this way, you will have all bias strips, and could have a stretch issue. I'd make good friends with starch or Best Press if doing it this way.

    That's the advantage of the PPing, as it will keep all steady and produce real straight seams.
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    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
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  5. #5
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    That is a simple string quilt block. If you google string quilts you will see many examples. And yes, you can sew a bunch of strips together and cut squares out on the bias. I've done it with triangles.

  6. #6
    Junior Member sandyquilts's Avatar
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    Lots of string blocks FREE here http://www.maryquilts.com/
    Sandy
    http://sandyquilts.blogspot.com

  7. #7
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    Here's a tutorial that shows how to cut them. Like has been mentioned they'd be on the bias, but if you're careful or use spray starch it shouldn't be a problem.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J5WgT...69C28&index=87
    Last edited by mooshie; 05-03-2013 at 09:57 AM.

  8. #8
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I wanted to mention something about the blocks being cut on the bias.

    Three years ago, I made a string quilt that was cut on the bias, and did not want to match any of the stripped seams, so I simply starched the snot out of my strips before cutting and everything turned out fine.

    I'm currently making a quilt with blocks that are cut on the bias, and this time I AM trying to match the seams. Because the blocks are cut on the bias, it's a little tricky, but then on the other hand, because the blocks are cut on the bias (ha ha), it's easier to ease in and finesse the seams! I've had to stretch some parts, and that results in a horribly wavy seam, but because it's on the bias, when I steam and press the seam it settles down beautifully. I get a wonderful, flat block with matching seams.

  9. #9
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    Love the block, probably because I just love the fabrics used to make them!

  10. #10
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    The block is very similar to one done on the 2012 Craftsy Block of the Month. It is a free class. She shows two methods to using scraps to make blocks. They turn out pretty and easy to do. Have a look-see...I think you will like it.


    Linda

    Sew little time and sew many ideas

  11. #11
    Super Member charsuewilson's Avatar
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    You could make strip sets and cut the triangles from those. Start with the right angle at the top. Then the next cut will be the right angle on the bottom, ..... You'll end up with two sets of triangles that will produce two different blocks if pieced the way shown in the photo.

  12. #12
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    Since the picture you linked to is from a blog that is still active today, why don't you just send her an email and ask?
    [email protected]
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
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  13. #13
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    If I were you I would paper piece (or other foundation). You can even draw the lines yourself on paper and make as many copies as you need - that way you'll have wide and narrow stripes just as you like it.

    ahha ... looking through her blog closer, at the end I found this sentence

    "After making all these blocks my sewing room was an absolute disaster! There were stacks of fabric, piles of scraps and bit of torn foundation paper everywhere! "

    so yup ... she paper pieced them.
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  14. #14
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    I'm with Charsuewilson - make strip sets and then cut - This quilter uses some nice funky colors.

  15. #15
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    Thank you all for your help and ideas. After reading all your replies, I'm excited to start this quilt. Of course I have to finish the one I'm making right now first! My daughter's room is white and pale mint green. She has my grandmother's old cast iron bed that I refinished in white with gold accents. I'm thinking about using this collection of fabrics (http://www.fatquartershop.com/Sweeti...1&Store_id=499) with white print fabric. I'm thinking I'll do a checker board pattern with white squares between the multi-colored squares and I'll quilt fancy hearts in the white squares. It is so fun having a girl and being able to do fancy quilts! Thank you again for all your help - this board is wonderful!

  16. #16
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    I love your ideas for her quilt! Sounds perfect!

  17. #17
    Super Member DOTTYMO's Avatar
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    Look at the block in a different way. Undo the 4 triangles keep in same places.
    Now rearrange them placing the 4 corners as the centre. You have a new square.
    I think you cold make this new block in stripes . I would use sew and flip method then cut diagonally to make original block.
    Finished is better than a UFO

  18. #18
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    https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&...nyAGCvoG4DQYes it is a string pieced block. I do it often. You have bias edges just use starch or a very light weight iron on stabilizer and change-O-presto you've got your block. Have fun they are addicting.

  19. #19
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    As you are making squares, you could start w/a center square and work out from there, like a log cabin. That way there would be no bias edges. And you wouldn't have to paper piece. I have paper pieced string blocks using telephone book pages (8") and Golden Threads quilting paper (12"). Just another option.
    "Proud Parent of an American Airman"

  20. #20
    Super Member mom-6's Avatar
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    I'm with peckish on liking the ability to get matching to work well with bias edges. Part of that probably comes from my years of sewing clothing and that being a standard technique for getting things to fit well. I will certainly say that when I first started piecing and only used squares and rectangles I sometimes missed having that little bit of "give". And I will also say that my first OBW I should have considered using starch because I chose a fabric that was not very crisp.

  21. #21
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    If you like this block you might also enjoy the hidden wells block. ITs on my to do list.
    http://moosestashquilting.blogspot.c...-tutorial.html

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peckish View Post
    That is a simple string quilt block. If you google string quilts you will see many examples. And yes, you can sew a bunch of strips together and cut squares out on the bias. I've done it with triangles.
    This is also in a book of Log Cabin Blocks--it has so many variations I can't remember all the block names. But I'm one that follows instructions because I'm sure they know the why it should be done that way.

  23. #23
    Member kymawmaw's Avatar
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    sew strips together then use triangle ruler to cut pieces or just cut on 45 degree angles is what I think I would do..but i am a beginner so not sure I am telling you right

  24. #24
    Super Member Wanabee Quiltin's Avatar
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    This block looks like a strip quilt to me. Maybe start in the corner instead of in the middle ? Lay out your strips and make sure they work and make all the blocks to match.

  25. #25
    Senior Member maxnme01's Avatar
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    With bias edges another way to control them is to baste stitch on the bias edge 1/8" from the edge. Leg the feed dogs do the work so you don't stretch it while doing this. Keeps the bias side from stretching at all.

    I frequently do this around the entire ed of my quilt top before I sandwich it for the same reason.
    Keep smiling, it makes others wonder what you're up to!

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