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Thread: I have a question about buying an Amish quilt.

  1. #1
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    I have a question about buying an Amish quilt.

    Is buying an Amish quilt a good investment? I mean would it go up in value like you see some on Antiques Roadshow?

  2. #2
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    Depends on the quilt. If vintage then perhaps. If a new one, then it provably won't. I am not sure a quilt is a good investment at this time in our economic history. A quilt appraise would have a better answer. I suggest a lot of research before making a large purchase.

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    Yes, That is what I thought. I am going to a big Quilt auction in Michigan tomorrow and thought about spending 1,000.00 on a good quilt for an investment, but maybe I should wait.
    Last edited by wentaway; 05-17-2012 at 06:42 AM. Reason: spelling

  4. #4
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Think of it like art. Not all art is a good investment that will appreciate over time. In fact, most won't. The same is true of quilts. I would never advise anyone to invest $1,000 in a quilt these days, expecting it to appreciate. Chances are about 99+ out of 100 it will not appreciate.

    Also, have you considered liquidity? Quilts are not exactly a liquid investment vehicle. It's *hard* to find a buyer for a quilt. At least with art there are art galleries that will handle the buying and selling of works of art. There is no equivalent of that for quilts, which means that there is a lot less buying and selling going on.

    Is this quilt auction for rare vintage quilts? Or for newly made quilts? The quilts that you see on the road show are rare, unique, and in some way of historical value. You will not get that in a new $1,000 quilt purchased at a quilt auction. A vintage quilt of that price *may* appreciate in value over time, but then again it may not. Not all art appreciates over time.

  5. #5
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    I don't think quilts should be considered "investments" at all. Buy one because you want it to keep you warm or as an accent piece. That's it, IMO.

  6. #6
    Super Member crafty pat's Avatar
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    I would only buy it if I was going to keep it and enjoy it myself or hand it down to one of my kid's or grand kid's. As an investment I would not take the chance.

  7. #7
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Also keep in mind that it may just be Amish quilted and not Amish pieced. I read an article recently that some Amish quilts are not totally Amish made.

  8. #8
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wentaway View Post
    Is buying an Amish quilt a good investment? I mean would it go up in value like you see some on Antiques Roadshow?
    LOL, quilts are quilts. Judge by the quality, not the origin.
    I'm trying not to laugh too hard. Generally speaking, the Amish quilts in this area are highly sought after.
    Bad Spellers of the World
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  9. #9
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wentaway View Post
    Is buying an Amish quilt a good investment? I mean would it go up in value like you see some on Antiques Roadshow?
    Ignore my remarks. I glossed over the "investment".

    Or did you simply mean is 500,800 or a 1000 for a quilt, money well spent? If you want it & like it, buy it.
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  10. #10
    Senior Member QuiltingHaven's Avatar
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    We lived in Amish country in Ohio for about 7 years in 1988-95 and they always had an auction in the spring to support the school supplies/doctors/all for the handicapped. We bid and purchased a quilt every year and the price was always between $900 and $1200. They were ALL handmade by the women of the community and ALL the proceeds went to the school. People came from as far as New York to purchase these quilts. You could go around and examine them, check out the work, see which women completed which quilt. I still have all these remarkably beautiful quilts and even tho I am have now started quilting, I still look in amazement at the quality of the work and the durability of these quilts. I love and use each and every one of them. We did it to get beautiful quilts without the guilt of spending so much money for the quilts. We gained and they gained. Investment, not so much.
    Busy in Ohio

  11. #11
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
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    I am confused? What exactly makes an Amish quilt worth more than one made by anyone else? Do you think they hand piece them?....they use treadle machines. Does a quilt that is handquilted have more value than one that has been beautifully and intricately machine quilted? Does a quilt that my great-grandmother made have less value than one made by the Amish? I live in the midst of the Amish and while I think that their way of life is very uncomplicated, I don't value their quilts over any other.

  12. #12
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    If you want to see the value of many quilts, go to a consignment mall or a local auction. Around here, a "old" quilt can usually be purchased for a hundred or so
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    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    If you prefer to know you have an original Amish made quilt then that's what you will be happier buying.
    Got fabric?

  14. #14
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    if it is well taken care of- stored properly- used gently- and saved for your grandkids/great grandkids they may have a real treasure- location matters, timing matters, the current market matters- just like with stocks- values go up & down- but any quilt- amish or not- if it is appealing, has excellent craftmanship, visual appeal, and a (timeless) design if cared for will at some point increase in value....if taken to the right place at the right time.
    appraisals go up & down constantly- one quilt i have has been appraised 3 times- all 3 times the value has been very different than the time before- and started high-went way down- then bounced back up even higher====it all depends and doesn't really matter if it's Amish or any other style.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  15. #15
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    Some purported Amish quilts are actually made by others in the community, including the Hmong immigrants. You can find information if you google Hmong quilts/quilting. So- if a quilt is purported to be Amish, don't be fooled by "Locally Made". I have a cousin who is Mennonite in PA. Not all Amish eschew electricity- it varies by community and their Bishops' edicts. As a financial investment- be aware that fabrics are fragile, can be damaged by dyes, touching, light and humidity. Conservation storage is crucial. Most quilts do not appreciate much in value, and appraisals are very subjective. So- buy what you enjoy but don't expect a return on your investment. Old/rare quilts do sometimes appreciate, but it's like investing in an oriental carpet. You need to be extremely knowledgeable, and they can be difficult to sell for what you hope to gain.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buckeye Rose View Post
    I am confused? What exactly makes an Amish quilt worth more than one made by anyone else? Do you think they hand piece them?....they use treadle machines. Does a quilt that is handquilted have more value than one that has been beautifully and intricately machine quilted? Does a quilt that my great-grandmother made have less value than one made by the Amish? I live in the midst of the Amish and while I think that their way of life is very uncomplicated, I don't value their quilts over any other.
    We watched a show awhile ago where there was a sewing machine set up. Looked all electrical to us. But may have been generator powered. Not sure if all quilts are sewn on treadles.
    Here is one interesting site that answers a lot of questions: http://www.amishquilter.com/interest...mish-quilters/
    Me, I would purchase an Amish quilt because of the history of their culture tied to it. They also shop in our stores and do support our communities with their hard-earned money just like the rest of us do, (they do pay taxes, except SS), so we don't hesitate to purchase the flowers, vegetables, and furniture from them. We have bought some of the most beautiful flower containers for very little from the Amish.

  17. #17
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I would not buy any quilt for an investment. I would only buy it if I really liked it and wanted it, about the way I am with most things.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  18. #18
    Super Member snipforfun's Avatar
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    I understand that some Amish are "outsourcing" quiltsto Hmongs for at least the piecing and maybe the quilting.

  19. #19
    Super Member Pinkiris's Avatar
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    There is a quilt and furniture auction run by the Amish community near where I live at least once a year. A couple of years ago, they started showing certificates of "authenticity" with quilts that are completely made by the Amish before the bidding started on thos quilts.. It was amazing how many quilts did NOT have the certificates.
    I've recently heard of quilts that are pieced by the Amish and shipped to China for quilting!

    LET THE BUYER BEWARE!!!
    Sue

  20. #20
    Super Member Wanabee Quiltin's Avatar
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    I bought a quilt at a bargain price about 3 years ago. I had seen one exactly like it for sale much much more than what I bought mine for. In the 3 years since then, the price has dropped. This is not a good time to make money on a quilt. If you are very very young, then if you wait until you are old, then maybe. And that's a big maybe.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by wentaway View Post
    Yes, That is what I thought. I am going to a big Quilt auction in Michigan tomorrow and thought about spending 1,000.00 on a good quilt for an investment, but maybe I should wait.
    Is this the Auction in Clare? I was considering going myself.

  22. #22
    Super Member Battle Axe's Avatar
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    Clara Kupk.....????? from Canada makes stunning quilts. I can't spell the last name. Where in Michigan are you going?

    Marcia

  23. #23
    FLQ
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    I attended a spring auction in Lancaster County, PA last week. The quilts were all made in the community by Amish or Mennonite quilters but were newly made. I was disappointed that I saw only one vintage quilt which was a snow ball of ordinary quality. I didn't see the final value of that. The sale was a benefit for the community fire house. There were many bidders. Most of the quilts were 90 by 100 approximately and the final prices ranged from 250 to 750. One quilt sold at 1000.00. The auction began with more than 200 quilts. My opinion is that in time a signed, dated quilt of good quality and design will hold it's value or appreciate. The Amish made quilts are considered collectible but I agree with thinking of the quilts as "art.". That doesn't mean the monetary value will increase. Just my 2 cents on this topic

  24. #24
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by snipforfun View Post
    I understand that some Amish are "outsourcing" quiltsto Hmongs for at least the piecing and maybe the quilting.
    Hmong embroidery is beautiful and has been shown in art galleries (Long Beach, CA in the late 1980's). The embroideries tell a story. Whether you buy quilts, or anything else, buy because you like it. Investments in anything are "iffy" right now. Except maybe Facebook stock...if you can get in on the initial offering! LOL
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

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    I never thought of a quilt as an investment.

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