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Thread: I have a question about buying an Amish quilt.

  1. #26
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    Remember an Amish quilt and a quilt made by the Amish are two different things. Real Amish quilts use black and the bright Amish colors. Most quilts I've seen at auctions are "quilts made by the Amish". Imthink you need to buy something you like and is "valuable to you".

  2. #27
    Super Member TexasGurl's Avatar
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    If you mean the traditional, antique Amish quilts in deep solid colors ... yes they CAN be a good investment ...
    If you mean a recent Amish quilt made of print fabrics ? not so much ... it won't be worth much more than ANY hand-made quilt you'd buy in the US. Evidently they don't make many in the beautiful solid colors anymore ... a real shame.
    Buyer beware ... do your research ... they may or may NOT be made by the Amish (Hmong piecers etc) or may only be quilted by them. We saw a lot of "Amish" quilts two years ago at a big auction here in Texas - they were NOT well made and all in 1980's calicos ...
    Last edited by TexasGurl; 05-18-2012 at 06:06 AM.

  3. #28
    Super Member sewmom's Avatar
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    Ive been to the sale in Clare a few times, but have never sat in on the auction. It is always very crowded in there and i couldnt even get in to look at the quilts. We are usually gone for the holidays and this year we are around but busy getting ready for my DS and family's visit next month. Probably wont get to go. Sigh. If i were to buy a quilt, i think i would get one because i love it and not so much for an investment. My Dh probably wouldnt let me buy one cuz i could just make it( his words) but i've seen many out there that i wouldn't even attempt. Too intricate! And past my ability.good luck if you go!
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  4. #29
    Super Member Havplenty's Avatar
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    i would say take that $1,000.00 and buy facebook stock. the initial ipo is today. it's a sure bet that asset will appreciate in value.
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  5. #30
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Candace View Post
    I don't think quilts should be considered "investments" at all. Buy one because you want it to keep you warm or as an accent piece. That's it, IMO.
    I agree with you. Buy it because you love it and will use it. I can't imagine it would appreciate in any valuable way in your life or your children's so why take the chance. If you're looking for investment opportunities, I don't think an Amish quilt would be it. But that s not to say they aren't worth the money. A car is not really an investment either and look now much we pay for those!

  6. #31
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FLQ View Post
    I attended a spring auction in Lancaster County, PA last week. The quilts were all made in the community by Amish or Mennonite quilters but were newly made. I was disappointed that I saw only one vintage quilt which was a snow ball of ordinary quality. I didn't see the final value of that. The sale was a benefit for the community fire house. There were many bidders. Most of the quilts were 90 by 100 approximately and the final prices ranged from 250 to 750. One quilt sold at 1000.00. The auction began with more than 200 quilts. My opinion is that in time a signed, dated quilt of good quality and design will hold it's value or appreciate. The Amish made quilts are considered collectible but I agree with thinking of the quilts as "art.". That doesn't mean the monetary value will increase. Just my 2 cents on this topic
    Tacking the word "Amish" to a quilt does nothing for the quilt. Its quality and workmanship are what makes a quilt collectible-------and that better be ultra/mega/extra fine quality.
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  7. #32
    Super Member amandasgramma's Avatar
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    Too many responses to read them all. However I want to make a point. I was in the Amish "country" last year. I questioned 2 shop owners about how many Amish are there and how can they get so many quilts done to have EVERY shop selling them (it seemed). WELL, big surprise --- the Amish are not the only ones that make them. Others in the community do the sewing, too. As long as the quilt met certain requirements (hand pieced/handquilted among others) then they were considered AMISH! SO -- to answer your question -- i wouldn't buy one thinking it's an investing in AMISH.....
    Dee


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  8. #33
    Senior Member quiltmau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Candace View Post
    I don't think quilts should be considered "investments" at all. Buy one because you want it to keep you warm or as an accent piece. That's it, IMO.
    When I was working and able I bought 2 Amish quilts-I use them and they will never be 'antiques'. I bought them because I liked them and didn't quilt at that time. Even now I would not make the patterns as the are very labour intense.

    Mine are used daily and not an investment-it never crossed my mind. I just liked them.

    Isn't that what quilting is all about?

  9. #34
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    I can't imagine wrapping up in an "investment." Quilts are made to be loved and enjoyed.

  10. #35
    Super Member justflyingin's Avatar
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    Unlike art such as paintings, however, things made of fabric will eventually deteriorate.

  11. #36
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    I'd rather invest in one of Born To Handquilt's

  12. #37
    Senior Member Ellen's Avatar
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    If you want an investment, buy silver dollars or 1 oz. ingots. The price of silver is at an all time low ($28) and try to find someone who will sell it for less than $2 over spot. Believe me, it's going up again soon. There shouldn't be a tax on this because you're just exchanging money.
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  13. #38
    Super Member KyKaren1949's Avatar
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    I attend the Amish auction at Cannelburg, IN every year. There are approximately 150-200 Amish made and quilted quilts auctioned off. I have bought two there-one I paid $450 for and the other $550. Both were queen size.
    Then, four years ago, I found an Amish lady in Topeka, IN to make a quilt for my new King size bed. She made the quilt and two king sized pillow shams for $500. I selected and paid for the fabric ahead of time. Then, I bought another Amish pieced and quilted queen size quilt at an Amish owned quilt shop in the Shipshewana area for $700. I treasure all of them and probably will not buy anymore. They are SO well made and beautifully quilted. I consider them a treasure, but probably no one else would. They're just gorgeous.
    Karen in Kentucky

  14. #39
    Super Member ILoveToQuilt's Avatar
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    If you are looking for an investment, buy silver or gold bullion. Silver is selling for around $30/troy ounce today. Gold at about $1600/troy ounce. Over the long term, precious metals (gold, platinum, palladium, silver and copper) are some of the best investments around. Granted, bullion is NOT as pretty as quilts are, but it is a much more solid (no pun intended) investment than quilts can ever hope to be. JMHO.
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  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Candace View Post
    I don't think quilts should be considered "investments" at all. Buy one because you want it to keep you warm or as an accent piece. That's it, IMO.

    Throughout recorded history, that's what quilts and/or blankets were for. The “investment” part was simply a portable device-rolled up and taken away-that can be transported with ease during times of migration and used mostly up. The quilts were something a busy wife or daughter (sometimes the men, though rarely) would do during lull at the farm or at night before bed. It was a thrifty means of using up the odd & ends of sewing. That’s it!
    Quote Originally Posted by Monroe View Post
    Some purported Amish quilts are actually made by others in the community, including the Hmong immigrants. You can find information if you google Hmong quilts/quilting. So- if a quilt is purported to be Amish, don't be fooled by "Locally Made". I have a cousin who is Mennonite in PA. Not all Amish eschew electricity- it varies by community and their Bishops' edicts. As a financial investment- be aware that fabrics are fragile, can be damaged by dyes, touching, light and humidity. Conservation storage is crucial. Most quilts do not appreciate much in value, and appraisals are very subjective. So- buy what you enjoy but don't expect a return on your investment. Old/rare quilts do sometimes appreciate, but it's like investing in an oriental carpet. You need to be extremely knowledgeable, and they can be difficult to sell for what you hope to gain.

    Heed the above well.
    Quote Originally Posted by justflyingin View Post
    Unlike art such as paintings, however, things made of fabric will eventually deteriorate.

    Or through vigorous and constant use in a home. How do you think people of all classes survived the elements?

    Read this article written by a professional quilt/textile appraiser It just might open your eyes about the reality of "investing" into common household products, no matter how beautiful it might be:
    http://planetpatchwork.com/appraise.htm

    I would invest into something more durable & portable. Like Gold & Silver.
    Last edited by Bicycle Hobo; 05-18-2012 at 04:26 PM.

  16. #41
    Senior Member stchenfool's Avatar
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    Beautiful response!
    Love 4 stchen

  17. #42
    Super Member nancia's Avatar
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    would much rather have a quilt made for me by a friend or family member,or, for instance ,quilted by one of the experienced and skillful quilters on this board. we have "amish" quilts here, too, and these have large single thread quilting done by hand, and ordinary designs. i have some real doubt as to their value being more than a regular blanket. of course, i don't go to wal-mart when i'm looking for tiffany, and neither would you. know what you are getting, get it because you love it and then the price should reflect what it is worth to you in terms you can afford. the whole basis of price is set by what people are willing to pay for it. if no one will buy it at that price, it is overpriced.
    The only bad days are the ones you don't get.

  18. #43
    Super Member Battle Axe's Avatar
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    Anyone going to the Claire quilt auction today????????? I'd love to have a report of what was there. Did Clara Kuipher ? have any there.

    Marcia

  19. #44
    Super Member applique's Avatar
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    Pre 1900 seven sisters quilt from a collector $3000

    I work part time at the New England Quilt Museum and we do occasionally have old quilts for sale. The best are from collectors who are downsizing and getting rid of some of their collection. These are the quilts which sell for higher prices and tend to be bought by other quilt collectors. A very select few "make money" from what I have seen.
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  20. #45
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    as long as you realize that they are made with walmart fabrics, or that quality might not be to your standards AND that the Amish do NOT do all of those quilts, but they are often done by the Hmong people!

    It takes a lot of research before jumping on the "Amish made quilt" wagon!

  21. #46
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    I don't think it's going to be valuable in your lifetime. It's mostly the very old antique quilts that are valuable. If things keep going up in price it may cost more to buy one in the future. I'm not as excited about Amish quilts as I usded to be. It was in the news that some are not done in the USA. I've seen many duplicates lately. I would want one that is one of a kind so would look for a quilter willing to make one for me but not as an investment.

  22. #47
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    I don't think it's going to be valuable in your lifetime. It's mostly the very old antique quilts that are valuable. If things keep going up in price it may cost more to buy one in the future. I'm not as excited about Amish quilts as I used to be. It was in the news that some are not done in the USA. I've seen many duplicates lately. I would want one that is one of a kind so would look for a quilter willing to make one for me but not as an investment.

  23. #48
    Power Poster joyce888's Avatar
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    I have a friend that bought two Amish quilts thinking they would be valuable and should have them appraised and insured. Was she ever shocked when she was told the fabric was a poly-cotton blend and although they are nice would not increase in value.
    Joyce

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  24. #49
    Super Member BrendaY's Avatar
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    Love the "Amish" quilts

    If you really would like to have an Amish quilt, why not make one yourself? There are lots of books and patterns you can use. You don't have to be Amish to create a beautiful quilt, and I think the investment potential would be about the same. Plus it would have more meaning to future generations of your family because it was created by your own loving hands.. Just the way I think and for what my opinion might be worth to you...

  25. #50
    Super Member justflyingin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrendaY View Post
    If you really would like to have an Amish quilt, why not make one yourself? There are lots of books and patterns you can use. You don't have to be Amish to create a beautiful quilt, and I think the investment potential would be about the same.
    I think it is a great idea!

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