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Thread: I just can't believe my eyes with this batting.

  1. #26
    Junior Member sandyquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by verna2197 View Post
    Picture number 1 is the batting I use for my quilts. Its all 100% cotton. Suppose to be very good batting. I made a quilt for my bf for her birthday in 2008 she just gave it back cause her dog thought it was a chew toy. As I was taking it apart to fix I just about freaked out. I can't believe that this is what the batting turned into in only 5 years.

    Attachment 387285
    here is picture number 2 after I took the batting out of the quilt.

    Attachment 387286

    Can anyone on here tell me why this happened? It just seem like it should be like this.

    Wow, this is shocking. I'd send a sample and the photos into the manufacturer. They should know what their batt has done. Their R&D department should get on this. I did this with a poly Mountain Mist batt and they exhausted testing it. Though they couldn't come up with the reason that it bearded so badly that it looked like it needed a shave, they went the extra length trying to find the reason. SandyQuilter (not sandyquilts)
    Sandy
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  2. #27
    Power Poster gabeway's Avatar
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    Has dog done other things with it like pee on it? Maybe it was washed frequently in hot water.
    Wayne & Gabriele, the married quilters.

  3. #28
    Super Member Sierra's Avatar
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    Two of the first quilts I ever made were full twin size, one with warm and natural and the other a poly batting (don't remember the name). Their mother washes them every two weeks in an agitating machine. The quilts have had issues with the stitching coming loose (my machine then was not really made for quilting) and I have mended them, but there has been no problem with the batting on either. I've asked her to use only gentle cycle and that has helped, but the quilt tops are pretty worn. Better worn than put in the closet!

    Front loading machines not only handle large items better than agitators but they are incredibly gentle. I really celebrated the day my old machine finally died and I got a front loader. All my clothes are doing better!

    I really think that the combination of pets that may be very active and the constant washing are the culprits! Make your friend a wall hanging! Make her dogs each a quilt to be abused. She may be wonderful, but she is not a "quilt" person.

  4. #29
    Super Member luvstoquilt's Avatar
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    YIKES! I would notify the mfg for sure!
    "You must do the thing you think you cannot do"....E. Roosevelt

    Sharon
    Yorkville, IL

  5. #30
    Super Member roserips's Avatar
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    Living in Washington I had the opportunity to visit the Warm and Natural Company where they make their batting. Warm and Natural uses a scrim to hold the cotton in place allowing it to be quilted further apart. The scrim also controls bearding of the batting. There are polyester bats that have a scrim and there are ones that don't and those can beard and migrate as well. Interesting to see what happened to your quilt. Looks like you had quilted fairly well but the batting probably had no scrim so it migrated where ever it choose.

  6. #31
    Super Member meanmom's Avatar
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    I have never taken a quilt apart but I agree that I think weekly washing since 2008 is a major culprit. That is a lot of washing. I am surprised there is any fabric left after that many washings.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by verna2197 View Post
    100% cotton hand tyed pretty close. I can't think of the name of it but I get it at Hancocks. Now this is the very fist time I have saw something like this. I asked her what did you wash it in, she said the washing machine. LOL! I asked her if she used bleach and she said no she does not like bleach but she does wash it everyweek on account of her pets.
    A lot of the problem may have been the every week washing. I only wash mine every few months (more often if heavily soiled) and only in cold water. I do air mine out on the line quite often.
    Aronel aka Lee

  8. #33
    Super Member OKLAHOMA PEACH's Avatar
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    Make her a new dog quilt, give her a lint brush and fabreeze.

  9. #34
    Super Member sewdamncute's Avatar
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    Wow, I can't imagine what would cause that.....
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    Darlene

  10. #35
    Senior Member quiltingnd's Avatar
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    So quilts shouldn't be washed often? What's considered often? I was told by my LQS that I could use and wash my quilts like normal blankets. Are they wrong?

  11. #36
    Super Member margecam52's Avatar
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    First...it's cotton, and not needle punched. Cotton like this is made to be hand or machine quilted no further than 2" apart (some now say 4", but it won't hold up to washing at 4").

    You tied the quilt...that's the 2nd issue..no way will un needlepunched cotton hold up to tieing. I have a couple of vintage (1920's) quilts...the batting is about gone in them...lumped up next to the hand stitching.

    I have two packages of 100% cotton batting...both came from customers...I replaced theirs with 3oz poly..they agreed after handling one of the old quilts.

    For a quilt that will get a lot of washing...100% poly is best.


    Quote Originally Posted by verna2197 View Post
    Picture number 1 is the batting I use for my quilts. Its all 100% cotton. Suppose to be very good batting. I made a quilt for my bf for her birthday in 2008 she just gave it back cause her dog thought it was a chew toy. As I was taking it apart to fix I just about freaked out. I can't believe that this is what the batting turned into in only 5 years.

    Attachment 387285

    here is picture number 2 after I took the batting out of the quilt.

    Attachment 387286

    Can anyone on here tell me why this happened? It just seem like it should be like this.
    Marge Campbell
    TL18LS/Qbot automated quilter
    http://www.Lmcampbel.com

  12. #37
    Super Member kiffie2413's Avatar
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    I have to say I also thought about you saying her "dog thought it was a chew toy"...as it does look rather chewed, too...the combo of that and weekly washing....
    I also mainly use Warm and Natural or Warm and White.
    K
    Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest~Mark Twain

  13. #38
    Super Member vickig626's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ube quilting View Post
    look no further than "washing it every week". Quilts really aren't meant to be treated like that. Anything would wear out with that much washing.
    peace
    I agree. I only wash my bed quilts 1 or 2 times a year depending whether it needs it or not. My son brings his "one of a kind" (my avatar) quilt home for me to wash once a year. Can't imagine how hard weekly washing would be on a quilt.
    Life's More Fun with a Doxie !!
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  14. #39
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    oh my gosh!!!!

  15. #40
    Senior Member Judi in Ohio's Avatar
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    I hardly know what to say, except WOW she washed that quilt every single week?????? Isn't that rather excessive - lol I can't figure out how it stayed together that well actually. But the scrim does seem to be missing. I use 80/20 and wool, but I'm not sure they would hold up to that kind of use.
    Judi in Ohio

  16. #41
    Senior Member kat13's Avatar
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    wow, this is all nice to know, so glad you shared this! I usually use warm and nataural because I like the way the needle glides thru it and it has no lumps or thin spots like the poly I first tried. I'm still learning tho so this has
    been very interesting! thank you for sharing!

  17. #42
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    It does seem as if the cotton just dissolved, but that's over 250 washings. It's a little surprising that any part of it survived. I would say it served its purpose well enough. Maybe you can help your friend decide that a handmade quilt isn't the thing to use in this way. I guess your friend appreciated it if she's hoping to have it restored, but perhaps if you want to be generous you could make a little wall hanging out of the best part of this and suggest (or give her) a Walmart quilt for the dogs. It would not be worth your trouble or expense to make something that is going to be put through this kind of wear and tear.
    "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." - Voltaire

  18. #43
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    This may sound dumb, but if her dog thought it was a chew toy, wouldn't that make a mess of the quilting. Also, why did she give it back to you? Did she want you to redo it?

  19. #44
    Super Member DOTTYMO's Avatar
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    Just retread original post. Why didn't the dog think it was a toy before now. If she has had it for 5years it sounds as if some smell that the dog detected happened in the quilt. What did you do just before. The dog chewed. New washing powder or something . Even a new aerosol could cause problem. My youngest dog is having medication the first given by vet no problem, second was you must have this. She is back on the first and jumps up to have it as. If it is a sweet. Smell is all we can think is different.
    Finished is better than a UFO

  20. #45
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    My first thought was your friend washing it every week. ((HUGS)) I'd go with a poly TBH. Best Wishes.
    ~looking for fabric...if you have some you would like to sell, please PM me~

  21. #46
    Senior Member mshollysd's Avatar
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    This is what I heard a long time ago: When you wash and dry your quilts in a regular washing machine and dryer, you age your quilts 10 years. She washed it every week. Cotton doesn't take the washing as well as polyester, so this doesn't surprise me. When you wash a quilt you should do it in your bathtub, no twisting, and hang it over 4 clothes lines to dry out of the sun. The detergent you use needs to be mild and not too much. I know someone is going to be mad at me for my comment. I had a girlfriend who got a beautiful star quilt made by a wonderful native american, it was tied, not quilted, and she washed it every week. The 1/4 inch seams couldn't take it either and it fell apart. My friend was blaming the lady who made it but really it was washing it all the time, so I looked it up about the care of a quilt and that washing and drying it in regular machines is the worst thing you can do to a quilt.

  22. #47
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    My back wouldn't take washing a quilt in a bathtub. It works just as well to use a top-loading washer; just do not allow any agitation. Fill washer with water and soap, stop machine, add quilt, agitate by hand pushing down on the quilt, advance switch to spin, spin out wash water, fill with rinse water, stop machine, agitate by hand, advance switch to spin, and spin out rinse water.

    Aside from being easier on the back, this method has the advantage of getting more water out of the quilt before handling. Water is very heavy and puts a lot of stress on stitching and seams.

    Instead of hanging on clotheslines, where water weight adds to stress, I advocate laying out in the shade on top of a sheet, covering with another sheet (to protect against errant bird droppings), and anchoring with rocks.

  23. #48
    Member piecNpat's Avatar
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    I have also made a dog quilt...two actually for our American Bulldog grand dog. Both are rag quilts with the frayed edges. They have been washed weekly and they are still intact after ten years for one and five for the other. I did repair the top and backing on the first one as the fabric became worn on it, but not the batting. Now I will tell you that I used Warm and Natural batting and it held up beautifully. I think the skrim and the fairly close meander made all the difference.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    I also think the problem is that this was a traditional 100% cotton batting without scrim. This type of batting is meant to be quilted every 2". When that is done, washing every week is not a problem. I had a chance to examine one of my crib quilts 20 years after I made it, and it was washed *frequently* in the machine. The binding was worn in places, but the quilt itself was soft as a cloud; the batting simply got softer with each washing.

    Tied quilts really benefit from a cotton batting that is needlepunched through scrim (such as Warm and Natural). These battings say that quilting lines can be up to 10" apart because the batting will hold its shape.
    Is WARM AND NATURAL an OK batting to use. This is what I've purchased - but as of yet gotten that far on my quilts. Thanks.

  25. #50
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jane3 View Post
    Is WARM AND NATURAL an OK batting to use. This is what I've purchased - but as of yet gotten that far on my quilts. Thanks.
    There are pros and cons to each type of batting. Warm and Natural is very good for tied quilts because it is needlepunched through scrim, which makes it very stable. I haven't used it in years because I prefer a more traditional cotton quilt look. My favorite batting is Mountain Mist Blue Ribbon, which is 100% cotton that is not needlepunched and does not have a scrim. However, MM is not suitable for tied quilts and needs to be quilted 2" apart. Warm and Natural, in contrast, can be tied or quilted up to 8 or 10" apart.

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