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Thread: I need your expert opinion please :)

  1. #1
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    I need your expert opinion please :)

    Hello everyone,

    If you have a moment, would you please tell me if you baste, spray or pin your quilt sandwich and why you chose your preferred way? I am in the process of quilting a baby quilt (my first) but I am getting stabbed, scratched and beat up by the pins I used to hold it in place. This is the way I was taught, but I know there are other ways and I want to be open to them, but would appreciate you sharing your experiences. Thanks so much.

  2. #2
    Super Member Monika's Avatar
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    Although I don't claim to be an expert, I will share what I do. I pin. All my pins have the little "jackets" and I use the Kwik clip tool. Never have pin pricks, it is quick and I don't get bunching on the back.

    I do spray small things sometimes, but I don't like the fumes and mess so I don't do it often.

  3. #3
    Super Member DOTTYMO's Avatar
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    You need to use bent safety pins designed especially for basting quilts or just tack all over in 4 inch squares.

    For a baby I would not use glue. Straight pins are not for basting.
    Finished is better than a UFO

  4. #4
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    I spray baste all mine after I learned about 505 basting spray. Will never pin again.

  5. #5
    Super Member Dina's Avatar
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    You can buy the bent safety pins at Wal-Mart, or at least that is where I got mine. MUCH better than straight pins! Ouch!!

    Dina

  6. #6
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    I spray baste for the most part. I generally toss in a few safety pins near the edges.

    As far as people worrying about the spray basting being a chemical, I figure by the time it's washed a couple of times there won't be any more chemical from that than all the other stuff used in the manufacturing process.

    I HATE to pin baste an entire quilt. I can't seem to use a closer tool properly and end up wearing all the skin off my fingers. While quilting, removing pins is a bother, too.

  7. #7
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    I used to safety pin my sandwich but I always got a wrinkle in my backing that way. The 2 methods I use now are: Hobbs 80/20 fusible quilt batt or 505 spray basting. The Hobbs is ironed to make the quilt sandwich to get it ready for machine quilting. The 505 spray is used to spray on both the backing and quilt top to baste it to a quilt batt.

  8. #8
    Super Member QuiltnLady1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    I used to safety pin my sandwich but I always got a wrinkle in my backing that way. The 2 methods I use now are: Hobbs 80/20 fusible quilt batt or 505 spray basting. The Hobbs is ironed to make the quilt sandwich to get it ready for machine quilting. The 505 spray is used to spray on both the backing and quilt top to baste it to a quilt batt.
    This is what I do athugh I do put pins on the corners just to make sure they don't fold over. I have problems with my hands and so I pin as little as possible.
    QuiltnLady1

    When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by DOTTYMO View Post
    You need to use bent safety pins designed especially for basting quilts or just tack all over in 4 inch squares.

    For a baby I would not use glue. Straight pins are not for basting.
    Ah, now there's a thought! Curved pins.....hmm.....I will have to checked into that. See? I didn't know that straight pins were not for basting. Thus the reason for soliciting your opinions! .

  10. #10
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    One of the best tings I discovered was spray basting, love it never looked back!

  11. #11
    Super Member Maggiemay's Avatar
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    I spray baste or glue baste. Both these methods have made a big difference in the quality of my quilting on my DSM. I do use pins (bent safety pins) on some of my bigger quilts after I spray baste. There has been a lot of discussion, both pro & con, on this board about spray basting but I love it!

  12. #12
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
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    I use washable school glue for all sandwiching. It is fast, easy and cheap! It is also very effective in keeping the layers together....no fabric shifting, so no tucks or pleats. It washes out 100% when washed in warm water/detergent. I vowed never to use any other method once I discovered washable school glue.

  13. #13
    Senior Member QuiltingHaven's Avatar
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    I agree with Tartan and do both. I also use clips the red ones or the ones that you put in your hair (much cheaper) to hold the three backing, batting, top together as I iron after either spraying or using the fusible quilt batting.
    Busy in Ohio

  14. #14
    Moderator Jim's Gem's Avatar
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    I spray baste all my quilts with 505 spray. Used to pin, but am not going back.
    I tape my backing down, layer the batting on top, smooth it all out, layer the quilt top on, smooth it all out, then peel back half of the quilt, spray, smooth it out then the other half, with both the batting and top layers.
    Never have had a problem with any shifting or anything.

    Oh, I do carefully check all the corners to make sure that they are sticking and respray that small portion if needed.


    My newest Grandson, Caleb Austin, was born May 29th. I am now Grandma to 4 precious babies. I am so blessed!!!!

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    Because of the fragrances, I spray baste very little. Have to step out of the room and it has to be early in the day sot the smell doesn't make my DH have an asthmatic attack. I used the curved safety pins and instead of closing them use the little foam pin guards. Look like little erasers tips from pencils.

  16. #16
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    I hate pin basting, since I tried the spray basting, that's usually the way I do it, otherwise, I'll thread baste.

  17. #17
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    I like spray basting even though they all smell, some say 505 doesn't but i find it smells just as bad to me guess I am sensitive. It does help to be outdoor but you can do it inside provided you have a lot of ventilation windows/doors open
    Brother (XL-3500i, CV3550, SQ-9050, Dreamweaver XE6200D), Juki MO-2000QVP, Handiquilter Avante

  18. #18
    Super Member KerryK's Avatar
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    I used the bent safety pins made for quilting. I do have some basting spray, but have not gotten brave enough to use it yet. I guess I should do that on a small project to get used to it. I feel sure I'd love using it.
    Kerry
    ~ American by birth, Southern by the grace of God ~

  19. #19
    Super Member woody's Avatar
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    I love my 505 to spray baste I have done up to a queen sized quilt with no problems
    The biggest risk is the one not taken

  20. #20
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    I do the spray basting and then I pin loosely - I don't always use the same spray and some spray holds a lot better than others so I just do it. I use a little wooden gadget to close the pins. It saves the fingers big time. It's called a Kwik Klip.

  21. #21
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    I know I'm a bit of the old school, but I pin and then hand baste.
    One step at a time, always forward.

  22. #22
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    often I thread baste- no *over spray-mess* from spraying; goes much faster (for me) than pinning & easier to remove than pins too...although at times I do just grab some bent safety pins for a small project- or for around the edges if I used a fusible batt (which is a second choice over thread basting) but most often I thread baste
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  23. #23
    Super Member ArtsyOne's Avatar
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    Once I discovered spray basting (I use the June Tailor brand from JoAnn's) it eliminated all the wrinkles and tucks I had on my backings. I used to hand-baste every four inches all across and down and diagonally and it was a real pain. I don't find that the spray has much odor at all, and I spray on my wood laminate floor. Once the over-spray dries it is easily wiped off with orange oil cleaner.
    A fabric stash is always missing that one fabric needed to finish the quilt on which you're working.

  24. #24
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    And the spray basting doesn't gum the needle? I use it for my machine embroidery and that doesn't gum up the needle, but it's only a small area. This is much larger so I am just checking. I may try a combination, but will definitely look into those curved pins and eraser type things to start with. So appreciate your honest feedback! Thanks!

  25. #25
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DOTTYMO View Post
    Straight pins are not for basting.
    I use straight pins to baste big quilts. I use Pinmoors with the pins and never get stuck. I have tried all the make do items to use but nothing works better for me then the actual Pinmoor. The fine pins slip right in and stay until I take them out. I now use a Pinmoor with every straight pin I use. I use long fine pins for basting. If you have to push the pin through the layers the pin is too dull. I have started using Elmer's washable school glue. It's fast and easy for a bigger quilt. The basting spray is too messy for me.
    Got fabric?

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