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Thread: I was so sad...

  1. #26
    Senior Member Katia's Avatar
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    You should be proud of yourself for introducing these kids to a beautiful art. But you are right. It is a shame that kids don't see the things some of us took for granted. My kids saw a lot of sewing. My sisters, mom and grandma all sewed to some degree. Plus throw in a little knitting and crocheting. It was just a normal thing for them.

    I do have to get a kick out of one of my grandsons. My daughter sews and has made quite a few quilts and other things. But for some reason he thinks I am the expert maker person. His words, not mine. The other day he told his mom to call and ask if I would make him a shark or crocodile. Okay, that's interesting. Then a week later he wanted to know if I had started because he wants it to be a great white shark now and as big as his body. So I am thinking maybe a sleeping bag? I have no pattern, so I guess I have to wing it. Last request was a real ninja suit, blue please. Which did turn out cute. If he were closer he would help. He loves to go to the fabric store and help match fabrics and later to work on stuff. He just turned six, so not really a lot of help, but he does enjoy the experience. He is supposed to come for a visit this summer, so I am thinking of doing it then so he can help. I need to work on a pattern.

    I think that it is so important for kids to get a well rounded look at least of all the home arts. We need to know more then how to go through a drive through or dial a phone to get food. And to have the relaxation of some kind of hobby. No matter what that might be. I know a lot of people that do not have any hobby at all. Nothing. They work, and that is about it. They hire someone to do the house cleaning and take care of their kids. They run the kids here and there so someone else can teach them baseball or dance or even to read. My dad taught me baseball and how to ride a horse and a bike and take care of the cows we had. My mom taught me to sew and to read, to crochet and cook or bake, and of course to clean. My grandma taught me to dance and to walk like a lady and talk like an educated person. Sure, I went to school and church and all that, but my parents were always laying down the basics. I did the same with my kids. And now I tell them every once in awhile to slow down. Take the time to garden and sew and read to the kids. Sometimes it seems like all the running around just makes circles.

  2. #27
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    I love your story about teaching the kids to make a pillow and use the sewing machine. It was so inspirational.

    I learned to sew in my home ec classes in jr. and sr. high school back in the 70's (my mother didn't sew). I guess I was lucky. I hate that schools can't/won't offer sewing classes anymore.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by annthreecats View Post
    I hate that schools can't/won't offer sewing classes anymore.
    Locally schools can't offer any arts anymore. I think my children had it better in the 90s than we did in the 70s and earlier. There was no way for me to get out of taking home ec. I did not want it and I did not need it but had to take it for a year in junior high (1977-78). My children took 9 weeks of different life skills classes. One year was cooking and one year sewing.

    I will be honest that even if I had raised girls and home ec were available I wouldn't have agreed to let them take it. They have much more important things to learn in school. All of my sons can cook and sew because they learned at home just like they learned woodworking, basic mechanics and basic horticulture at home.

  4. #29
    Super Member Cindy60545's Avatar
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    I, too, was one that took home ec in school. I made my own clothes til my mid-20's, then quit sewing for a few years. Then I made my living sewing by making sails for sailboats, including accessories covers. I did this for 15 years, then got hooked on quilting. Today? My grandson (now 8) is always wanting to go play in the studio. He really wants to learn how to use "Queenie" - my longarm, but I keep telling him that he needs to learn the regular sewing machine first. Better yet, the neighborhood boys come over & want to sew! Now I have boys ages 8-12 wanting to learn how to quilt! I so enjoy passing on this craft with them. It's a shame that our schools find that computer work is more important than the skills we learned to survive back in the stone age! Unless you can google it or have an app for it, these kids don't know common sense things like we were taught.

  5. #30
    Super Member carrieg's Avatar
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    Exposing kids to other things is how they learn. You did a good thing, don't be sad. My DH says the same thing about kids & farms. Farm animals, farm equipment, eggs, etc.

    My mom didn't teach me any crafty talents & she is 83. I recently taught my 23 year old neice how to quilt & so we will continue to add new quilters to the fold!
    Carol in Michigan

  6. #31
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    You are a very good teacher and should be commended. Teachers (and parents!) need to think: what can I do to inspire them today? What do they need to learn? You are the kind of teacher all kids need. Many teachers do all this, but some don't. And it is also a shame that most people don't appreciate or even recognize the wonderful jobs that most teachers do, spending their own money on things for the students, planning the lesson out all at home, like you did. Great job!

  7. #32
    Super Member lovelyl's Avatar
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    Bravo for you! What a wonderful project for preschoolers! At my school district they do not teach any sewing at all in any grade. Unless these kids have a sewing mom, they won't even know how to sew on a button! I learned to sew in school and it has been a peaceful hobby and, at times, a necessity. I hope parents will start complaining to school boards to bring back home ec in the schools. The boards won't listen to the teachers - it takes the parents to change things!
    Linda
    There may be times we are powerless to prevent injustice, but there must never be a time when we fail to protest. - Elie Wiesel

  8. #33
    Super Member nanna-up-north's Avatar
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    You are right, Linda. School boards only listen to the parents. I taught home ec in public school for nearly 30 years. We fought hard to keep sewing and cooking in the curriculum but the school said no.... too much money for supplies and they needed English, SS, science and math more. I argued that life skills would last for their entire lives and how often do you hear adults talking about Eng, SS, Sci and Math? They talk about the things that are happening in their homes on a daily basis. The new HS built the home ec dept with one kitchen set-up. How do you teach 25 students with one kitchen? I finally switched to teaching physics. Yes, it's possible to have brains and still think home skills are important. They used to tell me I was the teacher that knew foods and physics.... it was a joke to them.

    I still teach sewing to my grandkids and other relatives when I can. My nephews are mesmorized by my spinning wheel. Yes, I spin, too. I guess I am living in the wrong decade.... because it makes me sad as well that people think the things like cooking, sewing, parenting aren't important. They couldn't be more wrong.

  9. #34
    Super Member WMUTeach's Avatar
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    My paying job is at a university in the Family and Consumer Sciences department. Among other things we include basic sew skills to advanced pattern and costume design. We have full classes and most students are eager to learn these skills. It is common for our students to come with little to no experience with the art of sewing. All leave with usable knowledge and a number of them begin a career as a fashion or costume designer in our sewing lab. Others are learning skills that they will be teaching in high schools. We don't see "home economics" classes any longer but there is a reemergence of "life skills" classes in our high schools. Folks have discovered that to be a good consumer means to cook your own healthy food, mend your own clothing and care for your own home and car. It is a thrill to see our students making garments, bags and costumes for theater. Can a quilt or other needle craft be far behind? I used some of their space one day to layer a quilt and students asked many questions and were truly interested in the process. Bottom line is the interest is there in our children and young adults. We need to connect with them and show them the thrill of the needle and rotary cutter!!

  10. #35
    Super Member WMUTeach's Avatar
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    Nanna-up-north, I hope you get a chance to read my posting about the reemergence of those home economic classes in this thread. Of all of the education area at our university, Career and Technical Education is the one area that is growing. High schools are looking for educators that have the skills to teach basic cooking, sewing, home care and repair and financial literacy. I wish I could blink my eyes and be 25 years old again. I would love to teach those courses. Take heart, your voice was heard and a change is afoot.

  11. #36
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    I worked with preschoolers most of my life and this is something that most people would not think of. What a great experience for those children.
    A friend is someone who knows all about you and loves you anyway.

  12. #37
    Super Member LynnVT's Avatar
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    Fascinating stories here. I love teaching kids to sew on my Featherweight. My 7 year old grandson loves sewing; designed a pillow and small quilt on graph paper. I always have them use the foot on the floor and tell them that if they learn to control the machine they will be much better drivers when they get to drive a car. Thankfully all my 6 grands have mothers who sew at least a bit and are very crafty. Just wish 5 of them weren't 1,500 miles away or more. They all love their quilts and know I made them when they were babies.
    "The business of life is making memories. In the end, it is all we have." Butler Charlie Carson, Downton Abbey, season 4, episode 3, PBS.

  13. #38
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    I have a ggd (20 months old) who was over the house one day and the "house phone" rang.....she was perplexed at the sound and where it was coming from......and a bit frightened...now when she visits and the phone rings she will put her hand to her ear and say 'ello................

    When I was a newlywed and we were furnishing our home I had to have a sewing machine......I thought it was one of the "necessary" appliances in a house. Did not take me long to realize not true, but my daughters grew up knowing how to use "mom's" sewing machine to make repairs......unfortunately one of the two just returned a sewing machine I had given her several years ago-for my annual garage sale-as she "never uses it".....but one out of two isn't bad odds, but two gd don't know and don't want to know about sewing, altho when I babysat them as little ones they would "sew" w/me in my sewing room..........all they know now is texting on their phones!!!!!!what a sad thing.......

  14. #39
    Senior Member chaskaquilter's Avatar
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    I tried to teach two grandkids sewing, but it didn't hold their attention. Too slow of a process for them. Their digital world is a fast paced place. I will have my almost 9 year old for the weekend. I will try with her.

  15. #40
    Senior Member JaniceP's Avatar
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    Yes it is unbelievable. When I was in school..........and it's been awhile, almost 38 years I majored in Home Economics. I took 4 years of it and my Senior Year had some free time and was teacher's aid so it was like 5 years. By the time I was a Senior, I was sewing for some of the ladies at Church, making dresses and doing some tailoring for some teachers. I have always love to sew and learned on an old treadle from my mom and made my own doll clothes. I am currently working on My Crayola Quilt using my own bird photography and making lap quilts for all the kids and grand-kids so I can practice free motion quilting and just getting back into sewing after a few years break.
    Always in Stitches,

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  16. #41
    Senior Member Grannyh67's Avatar
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    Sewing is almost a thing of the past, so is needle work, no one does crafts anymore. I hear people say you can but it cheaper than you can make it. I guess you can on some things but I love making my own things. Just saying!!!
    Life is SEW great!!!!!!

  17. #42
    Super Member nanna-up-north's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WMUTeach View Post
    Nanna-up-north, I hope you get a chance to read my posting about the reemergence of those home economic classes in this thread. Of all of the education area at our university, Career and Technical Education is the one area that is growing. High schools are looking for educators that have the skills to teach basic cooking, sewing, home care and repair and financial literacy. I wish I could blink my eyes and be 25 years old again. I would love to teach those courses. Take heart, your voice was heard and a change is afoot.
    Thanks..... it's so good to hear that times are a changing..... I remember going over to WMU for FHA state conference so many years ago.... Yes, I know the name has changed. So much excitement in those days about doing the life skills contests and watching the changing of young people's lives. It was very rewarding but now I love to work with my granddaughter and great granddaughter..... and they love the lessons with their Nanna

  18. #43
    Senior Member nycbgirl's Avatar
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    My great neice Kassidy, in my avatar, always went with me the fabric store and we just loved to touch and feel the fabric. She was so cute as she ood and awed over the colors. She moved to Oregon last year and her mom told me that she created her own dress to wear to a father daughter dance that was held in their little city. She used a choke chain,( her dogs collar), and pulled the material through and fashioned a dress out of it! I have to say she it was really cute! Maybe she'll become a quilter some day!

  19. #44
    elm
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    It's all about change. Remember a few years ago the tv shows about modern people trying to live in the clothing, home and actual cleaning and working conditions of the 17th and 18th centuries? Just think, one day there could be shows about the quaint activities of quilters and fabric artists of the 20th and early 21st century!

  20. #45
    Super Member Latrinka's Avatar
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    Awe, sew sad!
    If a woman's work is never done....why start?

  21. #46
    Junior Member judys's Avatar
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    I took my spinning wheel to our preschool a few years ago and showed the children how to make yarn from wool. I had some wool that was right from the sheep, full of lanolin and some dirt, and had some wool that was washed and that I hand carded for them. Then I had some fluffy white wool that had been washed, carded and was ready to spin. They were fascinated by the whole process. I know none of them had seen anything like that in their lives. Probably their parents hadn't either. It was great fun.
    This year one of the teachers is retiring. I ironed white fabric to freezer paper and cut it into 6-1/2" squares and had the children each draw their own picture on a square. I took these home and just used sashing and corner stones to put them together. Then I used that wonderful binding that Charisma told us about with the two colors that you sew to the back and then topstitch on the 'flange' color on the front. Turned out well and I plan to use that binding again and again. We will present it to the teacher at our 'graduation party' this evening. I think she'll be pleased. Sure was fun.

  22. #47
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaryMo View Post
    but I bet all these kids can play Angry Birds on a computer!
    What does that say about our society?
    It says we are getting old. When we were young, there were the same concerns from our elders about old cultural things we were not being exposed to, and when these kids are old they will voice similar concerns over the upcoming generation...

    Be happy!
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  23. #48
    Super Member Caswews's Avatar
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    That indeed would be a sad experience, thankfully my grand daughters know all about sewing ! LOL been making em quilts since they were born ! same with clothes and they love it !!

    So glad you were able to show 9 more about sewing ! Thank you for letting the sewing/quilting move forward and maybe just 1 or 2 will take up a dying art !
    When Life brings big winds of change that almost blows you over.Hang on tight and Believe.
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  24. #49
    Super Member AZ Jane's Avatar
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    Funny this thread. My daughter asked on Mother's Day, why I had never taught them to sew? I don't know. I sewed so they wouldn't be naked, not for the love of it. I really don't recall if they were interested. They are both, extremely creative in other areas, just not sewing. Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
    Better to do something imperfectly, than nothing perfectly.
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  25. #50
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    We recently cleaned out my aunt's home and our 8-year-old DGD found a rotary phone. She had no idea what it was. It was hilarious. She does know what a sewing machine is and loves to use mine.
    I don't want to brag but I can still fit into the earrings I wore in high school.

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