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Thread: I was so sad...

  1. #51
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    "It's a shame that our schools find that computer work is more important than the skills we learned to survive back in the stone age! "

    Being one of the "elderly": it is not a shame that they are learning computer skills. If kids are to function in the working world they do need to know how to use computers. They are a fact of life. The skills from the "stone age" will not suffice any more. Even designing and sewing for a living requires computer skills (ever watch Project Runway and the use of tablets to draw and design fabric?)

    By the way, when I was in parochial high school there was no such thing as Home Ec and I have managed to survive these many, many years!

    I am teaching my niece to sew and she likes it. I tried with my great-niece and she had no interest. Like any other hobby, it is not for everyone.


    "It says we are getting old. When we were young, there were the same concerns from our elders about old cultural things we were not being exposed to, and when these kids are old they will voice similar concerns over the upcoming generation..."


    Amen!

  2. #52
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    "We recently cleaned out my aunt's home and our 8-year-old DGD found a rotary phone. She had no idea what it was. It was hilarious."

    Show them a record album - that really confuses them!

  3. #53
    Super Member sewmuch's Avatar
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    Thats a wonderful story, maybe they will become sewers someday...I remember teaching my gd's to sew on buttons they too were so excited, kept em busy for a couple hours...then I taught them to make simple quilt blocks, they loved it...now teenagers not interested, but they will come back someday to it....I hope...
    Nancy

  4. #54
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    It is sad. I would volunteer time to teach kids to quilt, but it would never be allowed in the schools here!!! Most of the public schools will not allow anything that will not help them to pass the TESTS. I have a friend who still teaches, and she is not even allowed to do an art project unless it is written into the reading or math curriuculum. No Child Left Behind has really changed the schools here, not always for the better.
    Sadiemae

  5. #55
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    My DGD was over with a friend. She loves to take fabric, drape it, and "dress up." The other little girl asked her what "those things" were. DGD explained that they were sewing, embroidery, serging, etc. machines. Her friend then asked her if Mimi had a sewing machine store. I didn't know whether to laugh or cry!

  6. #56
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    We have lost - or misplaced - many skills and much knowledge that previous generations had.

    (Reading Jean M. Auel's books - Clan of the Cave Bear was the first in a series - really helped me appreciate how much we have lost in knowledge of things like herbal medicine and basic survival - and also inspired amazement at how new things are/were discovered)

    Many of us are still 'behind' on the new things.

    Most of us manage to somehow survive in the present.

  7. #57
    Super Member roserips's Avatar
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    A few years ago my BFF and I did a class at her daughters school on a quick little card holder with a button sewn on for life experience class. They sewed the card holder then turned it right side out pressed it and then had to thread a NEEDLE! and hand sew a button on. They were wowed with the project and we had 2 hand cranks and one mechanical and one computerized machine so they were able to see the progression of technology. The hand cranks were a smash hit since they only sewed as fast as they turned the crank.

  8. #58
    Super Member Becky Crafts's Avatar
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    I've been very disappointed because I tried to teach our kids how fun sewing is & not one of them ever developed a passion for it. They do other crafts & have many happy memories of our projects together, but my hope of having a fun sewing day with one of our girls has been dashed. At least one of them owns a sewing machine & even bought an older treadle besides, but doesn't sew much. :-(
    Live Simply, Love Generously, Care Deeply,Speak Kindly, Leave the rest to GOD

  9. #59
    Super Member urgodschild2's Avatar
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    I sewed my girls dressed when they were little and di some other sewing. My girls could care less about sewing or any crafts. Where did I go wrong????????? Now my only granddaughter (almost 8) loves crafts and if I lived close by I think she would pick up the sewing. (Australia is not close) I would love to buy a sewing machine for her in Australia and her mom would use it for repairing things but I am not sure she would use it for anything else. I wish my daughters were crafty so I could have some pals to share with that are related to me. SIGH. I think about my sister-in-law who has two daughters and they all quilt. What a joy that must be for her.

    Barb
    Dreaming of New England while being stuck in So. Calif.(the asphalt jungle of the world.) But hey the Happiest Place on Earth is here.

  10. #60
    Super Member urgodschild2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sadiemae View Post
    It is sad. I would volunteer time to teach kids to quilt, but it would never be allowed in the schools here!!! Most of the public schools will not allow anything that will not help them to pass the TESTS. I have a friend who still teaches, and she is not even allowed to do an art project unless it is written into the reading or math curriuculum. No Child Left Behind has really changed the schools here, not always for the better.
    I just have to mention on this No Child Left BEhind. I am a retired Junior High teacher. Here we also had the No Child Left Behind syndrome and of course your state curriculum and standards to meet. Well I marched to a different drummer and di what i thought my students needed to learn. We did art projects and other fun stuff that all reinforced the skills they were to learn without too much pressure on my behalf. I felt that kids needed to learn but we can make it interesting along the way. I never taught to the tests. I figured that if I was doing my job and meeting the standards that all was all right. We made paper quilts.....I wasn't brave enough to bring in my expensive sewing machines and let 30 kids use them. It was enough having computers in the class room that i was always trouble shooting on. My kids tests scores were as high as everyone else and some even higher, so I figured that I was doing ok.

    When I taught elementray school way back in time.....I did bring my machine in and we did make quilts..........almost every year that I was there.
    Dreaming of New England while being stuck in So. Calif.(the asphalt jungle of the world.) But hey the Happiest Place on Earth is here.

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaryLane View Post
    I find that the domestic skills are becoming of more interest to the current generation. I could cook and sew when I was 8 years old but I didn't want people to know that even when I was an adult. One of my most embarrassing moments in junior high was winning a home ec award. Thanks to cable tv these skills are no longer looked down upon and it is okay to find pleasure in them.

    Today in a meeting at work one of my co-workers said she thought I should make everyone a quilt for Christmas and that she just LOVED quilts. Twenty years ago I wouldn't have let her know I sewed let alone quilted. Times are changing.

    My DIL is a medical resident I taught to sew. Some of her friends now want her to teach them. Society is reaching the point where we can appreciate the skill and talent in all fields, I believe. It wouldn't surprise me to see one of these mothers pursue sewing because we are so interested in keeping our children happy today.
    I have never in my life been embarrassed that I could sew, or knit, or cook. I was one of several kids who wore clothes in the style and colors I WANTED. And I was always proud of my sweaters that I wore to school. Befroe I was even in high school, my baked beans were requested at dinners around here. Can't even imagine being embarrassed about my accomplishments------------and I did it without one single home ec class.
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  12. #62
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sewmary View Post
    "We recently cleaned out my aunt's home and our 8-year-old DGD found a rotary phone. She had no idea what it was. It was hilarious."

    Show them a record album - that really confuses them!
    Who here remembers the aluminum "wave clips" we used back in the 50's? My sis in law, who grew up in California and is a couple years older than me, had no idea what they were.
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  13. #63
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grannyh67 View Post
    Sewing is almost a thing of the past, so is needle work, no one does crafts anymore. I hear people say you can but it cheaper than you can make it. I guess you can on some things but I love making my own things. Just saying!!!
    I beg to differ. Knitting, sewing, crochet, crossstitch, quilting, rug making and I don't know what all is more popular than ever, IMO. Now people do it because they WANT to, not because they have to. I know very, very few women who don't do some sort of handiwork.

    What's more, nowadays with JoAnn's and even libraries offering classes, anyone wanting to learn usually can. Sure didn't happen when I was a kid. You learned from a family member or friend back then
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  14. #64
    Senior Member RUSewing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grannyh67 View Post
    Sewing is almost a thing of the past, so is needle work, no one does crafts anymore. I hear people say you can but it cheaper than you can make it. I guess you can on some things but I love making my own things. Just saying!!!
    I sadly agree that this is the case for 90% of the children.

    Yes, they must learn computers for today and their future, BUT this is the first generation where 85% (at least) of children raised in Daycare, then school. Few have "quality time" with their mothers. Traditionally, Mothers taught their children to sew at home. Now when they get off work, gather their offspring, drive home, cook or get take home, eat, take jr. or sis to soccer practice/dance/gymnastics, etc. and finally get home. Then it's time for baths, finish up homework, read out loud and bed. Some lucky ones have husbands that help out, yet some are single mothers who have to try and do it all.

    It's a different world than the one we grew up in. Two parents, grandparents nearby. Progress? Not so sure.
    ~~ Butterflies can't see their wings.
    They can't see how truly beautiful they are,
    but everyone else can. People are kinda like that. ~~

  15. #65
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    I think one of the worst things to happen in the school systems is doing away with Home Ec. No wonder fast food places make so much money and children and adults are overweight the past 2 generations have not really learned cooking and sewing. My granddaughter took "Life Training" and had all of 3 weeks of cooking. I asked what she learned and she said they made ambrosia I laughed and siad ok what did you put in a pan on the stove? She did not sew anything that I know of. She graduated 5 years ago, so wonder what they teach now? And talk about other thing missing from schools is P E. again goes towards the weight problems. I think they should all go thru the humiliation we went thru taking showers and lousy at sports every day. OK stepping down from soap box. Take care.

  16. #66
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    My two girls had to learn to thread and sew on a sewing machine, hand sew a hem and button, make basic crochet or knitting stitches, crosstitch or embroider their name, iron and crease a dress shirt, and make bread. I didn't ask them I told them they were expected do it and I showed them how. They didn't have to keep it up but it's like riding a bike, they know how to get started.
    Got fabric?

  17. #67
    Senior Member cmw0829's Avatar
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    I've seen a lot of young women at my LQS and there seems to be a resurgence of interest. But my son's GF doesn't even know how to sew on a button.

    But then again, my mother didn't teach me how to sew, knit, crochet, etc. It was a babysitter old enough to be my grandmother. I'm the only girl of three who has these skills. Must have been the right babysitter at the right time.

  18. #68
    Senior Member Ccorazone's Avatar
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    What about metal ice trays you had to fill with water and the break your arm trying to get the ice out once they were frozen.

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  19. #69
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    thanks for the laugh! the post about the iron made me laugh. Can't imagine being without one
    Last edited by jerilee; 05-17-2012 at 11:01 AM. Reason: to clarify

  20. #70
    Senior Member Carol Ann's Avatar
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    Yay!! Now because of your help, we now have (maybe) nine more plus their mothers sewing. Good job!!!

  21. #71
    Senior Member Scraps's Avatar
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    My granddaughter chose sewing and cooking for extra curricular classes this year in 6th grade and is loving it!!! We are impressed with how well rounded the students are in their area. Music - reading - math - science, etc etc

  22. #72
    Super Member misseva's Avatar
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    I took HomEc back in the late 40s. My mom sewed like a professional, canned almost everything we ate, milked a cow, churned our butter, made my clothes, but after the divorce we moved to a big city and she worked outside the home. I made a skirt and vest in class - made an A. Took it home & mother made me take the skirt band off and re-sew it. I learned to crochet from my sister-in-law when I was 18, learned cross stitch from a book, and started quilting on my own. The only really useful thing I learned in class was how to read a pattern and set a proper table. Mother taught me to cook early at least by 8. Seems I've always known how to cook.
    TwandasMom

  23. #73
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    I'm not surprised that very few of our children are not exposed to such skills as sewing and cooking. When my oldest son was about three and I was sewing on the machine, I gave him a piece of fabric and a large threaded needle. He sat on the floor beside me and and took stitches until the fabric was "gathered" into a mass. I would just cut the thread and straighten it out and he began again. When he left for college, I included a small sewing kit and he earned a few quarters by sewing on buttons....

  24. #74
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    What a nice project for you to do with your preschoolers and I bet the pillows were appreciated.

  25. #75
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    It reaslly is sad, isn't it? I taught my son and daughter to sew and then my two granddaughters. My grandson made a quilt on my FW when he was 6. He loved the process as much as the girls. So many young people today make it a point of pride to say "I can't cook" or I can't run the vacuum cleaner or I can't (you fill in the blanks). They'll be sorry one day!

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