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Thread: I was so sad...

  1. #76
    Senior Member roseirish48's Avatar
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    i worked in the welfare dept for nearly 28 years. you would be surprised how many young adults(20-30 yrs) were being treated for depresion issues. Most of them had no life skills to be able to find and keep a job to support themselves. Many of them didnt even have a high school education. Maybe if they had a hobby like quilting they wouldnt need to be depressed unless if ws over the fact that they needed more money to support their hobby. At least changing from drugs to quilting as a habit would be more encouraging.
    I am glad my dd has decided to try making some quilt blocks to see if quilting could become a hobby. She loves picking out patterns and fabrics so its a step in the right direction.

  2. #77
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    I learned to sew when I was in 4-H; took Home Ec. but I learned more from my 4-H
    leader and my grandmother when it came to sewing. I taught 4-H sewing when my
    DD was in 4-H and I have taught both of my GD's how to sew, they haven't finished
    their 1st baby quilt, yet....but I have hope that someday they will find the time to do
    it. They found boys and then forgot about sewing. When I did ISS (in school suspension)
    I could work on anything I wanted while they had to do homework. I was hand piecing an
    apple core quilt, so I sometimes was hand piecing or cutting out the apple cores with
    a rotary cutter. Those boys were so interested in what I was doing....I even let one of
    them cut out a few apple cores...although I made sure they did it slow and easy. Another
    time I was writing out my Christmas cards and they wanted to know if they would get a card too,
    so I gave each of them their own Christmas card. I never had trouble with any of the kids
    while they were in ISS except one time and I asked the Principal if I had to listen to the
    bad language....boy did he let them know they couldn't use that language in ISS or around
    any of the substitute teachers. They don't teach sewing right now in our school, due to lack
    of funding or the teacher doesn't want to teach it. They do learn to cook some. They need to
    learn how to sew up a rip or sew a button on at some time in their life.

  3. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrannieAnnie View Post
    I have never in my life been embarrassed that I could sew, or knit, or cook. I was one of several kids who wore clothes in the style and colors I WANTED. And I was always proud of my sweaters that I wore to school. Befroe I was even in high school, my baked beans were requested at dinners around here. Can't even imagine being embarrassed about my accomplishments------------and I did it without one single home ec class.
    Different time and place, I suppose. I wanted to be taken seriously for math and science skills. Domestic skill seemed girly to me and at that time the last thing I wanted to be seen as was girly. I also learned by about age 7 to NEVER admit my mother or I had made my clothes. I lived in a small town and was teased unmercifully about wearing "home made".

    I, too, learned to cook and sew without home ec classes. Part of the embarrassment was because it took so LITTLE to win that award. I wanted to be seen as far more accomplished than THAT.

    Different time, different place.

  4. #79
    Member BeckyPotter's Avatar
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    My mother and my Aunt (her twin) both grew up knowing how to sew and cook. My mother never passed it on. I learned in school. She even made her own wedding dress. I never even saw it until I was about ready to get married.
    She only passed on the passion for books, which I passed to my daughters and crafts.

  5. #80
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
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    Smile

    There is hope though! I just got home (feet still hurting!) from taking 3 8th grade girls who helped me after school all winter with a Quilts of Valor project to the International Machine Quilters show in Overland Park, KS. As expected, they were jaw-dropping AWED by the quilt entries--racing around trying to figure which was their vote for viewer's choice! I could not keep up at all. Quickly became apparent that one was really into the paper pieced stuff, one had stopped at a long-arm vendors booth and she hit them all--has a real knack for free motion quilting, and the other was really into the design and colors. when we finally left I asked if any thought they'd continue with quilting--and got a resounding YES from all 3--all 3 looking into lessons this summer and getting their grandmothers to loan/get them a machine. These girls had very little experience and could not find that 1/4" seam to save them before Christmas--so putting together a snowball and 9-patch quilt was quite the challenge!

    On a funny note--when my daughter was about 3yr she was the "guinea pig" for being given an Stanford Binet IQ test by a friend--it uses little objects and asks what they are to that age group. When shown an iron, she promptly said "sewing machine"--because that is the only time she ever saw me use the iron!

  6. #81
    Super Member Grace MooreLinker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraRG View Post
    I work with preschoolers and for Mother's Day this year I thought it would be fun learning experience if they got to use a sewing machine to sew a pillow for their moms. I cut the fronts of white muslin and the backs of an assortment of pretty fabrics. The children used fabric markers to make a picture and write their names on the fronts and chose fabric for the backs. We read a couple of books about fabric and talked about our clothing, blankets and other textiles.

    Here's what made me sad... of my class of 9 children not a single one had ever seen a sewing machine. I showed them the parts, they helped thread it, how it worked, etc and they were so excited by the process. I put the foot pedal on the table next to the machine... they "hit the gas" using their hands and I guided the fabric. (I used a s l o w speed!) It was a smashing success! Even sadder, only one of my co-workers owns a sewing machine. One mom did come in and say her son couldn't stop talking about using "Miss Laura's Machine" to the point where she took the plants off the top of her great grandmother's treadle machine to show it to him.

    At least now there are 9 more humans who have seen, touched and used a sewing machine. Maybe one of them willl become a quilter!

    Laura
    What a wonder treat that must have been for you preschoolers and great gift for the childern could give their mothers, Last summer
    while visiting grand children I interduced 2 grand daughters to rag quilt making, we used jean and flannel fabrics hope to finish it this year in time for them to enter in in the fair.
    Freedom is costly and quilting keeps us busy...

  7. #82
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sadiemae View Post
    It is sad. I would volunteer time to teach kids to quilt, but it would never be allowed in the schools here!!! Most of the public schools will not allow anything that will not help them to pass the TESTS. I have a friend who still teaches, and she is not even allowed to do an art project unless it is written into the reading or math curriuculum. No Child Left Behind has really changed the schools here, not always for the better.

    there's always the possibility of starting an after school club devoted to quilting (&/or other handiwork)
    Bad Spellers of the World
    U N T I E

  8. #83
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaryLane View Post
    Different time and place, I suppose. I wanted to be taken seriously for math and science skills. Domestic skill seemed girly to me and at that time the last thing I wanted to be seen as was girly. I also learned by about age 7 to NEVER admit my mother or I had made my clothes. I lived in a small town and was teased unmercifully about wearing "home made".

    I, too, learned to cook and sew without home ec classes. Part of the embarrassment was because it took so LITTLE to win that award. I wanted to be seen as far more accomplished than THAT.

    Different time, different place.
    I started grade school in 1953 and graduated high school in 1965, never one time was I teased about home made clothes---which I made for myself from grade 5
    Bad Spellers of the World
    U N T I E

  9. #84
    Super Member jeanharville's Avatar
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    quiltingshortimer, your IQ story reminds me of a similar test being given to my little neighbor about 40 years ago. It had to do with identifying a clothesline and she couldn't because all of us in the neighborhood had dryers and she had never seen a clothesline in use. So as technology and society changes, we're sometimes surprised to find out what they don't know. It would be nice if kids could learn sewing at school, but since that may not be likely maybe we sewers could volunteer at community centers or churches to pass along this wonderful hobby and art. I know many of us make charity projects, maybe in the summer we could give kids a place to go and provide them the chance to participate in giving to charity. Just thinking out loud here. I certainly don't blame their mothers for not teaching them. A lot of women work outside the home and then come home to cook, do the wash, help with homework, and bath the kids. I know they are beat by the time there is an extra minute.
    jean

  10. #85
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    I realize that many kids do not even know where their food comes from if you ask them they say the grocery store.

  11. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrannieAnnie View Post
    I started grade school in 1953 and graduated high school in 1965, never one time was I teased about home made clothes---which I made for myself from grade 5
    You were indeed lucky then. I was born in 1964. I was the daughter of a divorce' (his choice, not hers) in a small town in the 70s. I was making clothes for myself, my sisters and my mother before I was 10. Kids made fun of me. They would check the fabric in the local dime store to see if what I wore matched it and tease me about it.

    On the other hand, my mom's friends were amazed at how well I sewed. But I sewed out of necessity not pleasure. It was only when my sons were in college and THEIR girlfriends thought it was great that I took pride in it. In my step-family it was considered cheap to give a gift home made. My girls love them.

  12. #87
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    About 50 years ago my cousin was asked to boil some water so my aunts could have tea. She didn't know how to do it and was concerned she would burn the water! It seems that too many moms have gone to work and don't do any baking, cooking, sewing, crafting like I did growing up. I had to grow up fast due to family situation. I made my first Thanksgiving turkey at 12 years of age and wasn't allowed to take sewing in school as my mom said I already knew how and didn't need to waste a class on something I already knew. Everyone seems to be so busy trying to get all the latest "this and that" and have missed out on the creative side of themselves. The guild I belong to is now meeting with children to teach how to sew and quilt. It will be a lost art along with many other things unless we all try to share our craft and get others interested as well.

  13. #88
    Super Member kitsykeel's Avatar
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    Oh dear Laura,

    What an ingenious idea. As a retired teacher, I understand the need to add a new dimension to a child's experience. Before I retired I was director and teacher for a group of pregnant and parenting teens in an alternative school. One of the skills I thought all girls and boys should have was learning how to sew. They all enjoyed it so much and we ended up with some really talented students who I am sure will one day persue sewing as they become situated and stable. I have started collecting vintage and newer machines at thrift stores for $15.00 and under, refurbishing them, and giving them to the students who continue to be interested. Bless you for your initiative in bringing something new and useful into those preschoolers' lives. My mother never sewed, but I learned in 8th grade home ec. My mom gave me my first machine in 1959, a Singer Centennial Featherweight. The first thing I made was slipcovers and curtains. I was 18 years old. I still have it and it works as well as it did back then.
    Kitsy

  14. #89
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    I volunteer at our small Christian school, where we have 9 students. Last month we made small pillows for their mothers and they got to use my Bernina sewing machine. Very similar to your story!! The kids loved it!! They see me at school and want to know what "Art" project they are going to make! I really enjoy that, too.

  15. #90
    Super Member Teddybear Lady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KarenR View Post
    I realize that many kids do not even know where their food comes from if you ask them they say the grocery store.
    On our local news tonight, a class at one of the local schools got to see a real dairy cow. They learned what the cow ate, how it produced milk, and even got to watch someone milk the cow. They interviewed some of the kids and they were so excited. One of my friends on facebook has a student in that class. He said they've talked about it all evening and keep wanting to drink milk. haha

  16. #91
    Member conniety's Avatar
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    As soon as my kids were big enough to sit on their own they would sit on my lap while I was sewing.
    When they were old enough to talk they would tell others they sewed on mommy's sewing machine!
    They love watching the bobbins wind

  17. #92
    Senior Member teddysmom's Avatar
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    That's really sad about children who have never seen a sewing machine. I'd say instead of progress that's definitely a sign of regression.

  18. #93
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    Red face

    My friend has a daughter who absolutely does not know what to do with her time. She did not have alot in terms of mothering, now is an affluent young bride who quit her job. She does not understand the wonderful parts of keeping house, of sewing..... It IS sad. I could absolutely never be bored, as there are always dozens of things to finish to start, to try, to improve. If she had been exposed in school it could be different. Wish I lived closer......



    Quote Originally Posted by Pam S View Post
    Maybe the children will remember their experience when they're older and think "if I could use a sewing machine when I was in preschool, maybe I could use one now." Wouldn't it be great if you've created one or 2 future sewing enthusiasts? Good for you for exposing them to something they may never experience otherwise.
    <a href="http://www.mylivesignature.com" target="_blank"><img src="http://signatures.mylivesignature.com/54489/336/AFDCC36A59CDFF42A211209DA03F222E.png" style="border: 0 !important; background: transparent;"/></a>

  19. #94
    Junior Member helenhiwater's Avatar
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    I was a substitute teacher for many years. One time I was in third grade and one of the other teachers brought in some pansies so that we could make paper flowerpots for Mother's Day. One child raised his hand and said he didn't have a mother. Other children nodded their heads, so I asked about their mothers. Some lived with grandparents, most lived in foster care. Only one or two children in a large class lived with their mother. I think of those poor children all the time. What is really sad is that their situation is not all that unusual these days.
    every cloud has a silver lining but sometimes it is hard to get to the mint

  20. #95
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    Sorry to state that the kids here get 8 weeks of sewing, maybe a pillow or a pair of shorts in 7th grade. Most are disaster because they have they no help but the teacher but she has 30 students in the class. Tried to teach my 4 grand daughters but so far no real takers. 2 do a little sewing. Maybe in time. I didn't start quilting till in 50's so there is hope.

  21. #96
    Senior Member Rubesgirl's Avatar
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    I learned to sew very young. A relative was a millner and gave me scraps and fabric flowers and petals to make doll clothes. My grandmother taught me how to hand sew them. My mother sewed beautifully, but only at night after we went to bed and woe to the child who even touched her treadle machine. I never learned how to coordinate feet and hands on a treadle, but took home ec in Jr. High and became very adept on an electric machine. I made most of my own clothes from then on and all of my DD's clothes until she begged me to stop in her teens. I tried to teach her how to sew but she refused to learn. Now, at 34, she is finally able to do simple sewing and is enjoying it. I think I may be able to get her into quilting at some point, especially since she loves to fabric shop and is great at putting fabrics together. It's a shame the school budgets so severely limit teaching home crafts. How are the young people to learn to take care of themselves without those classes, especially if there's not someone to teach them at home.
    Wendy in FL

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  22. #97
    Super Member Mad Mimm's Avatar
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    I can understand why that would make you sad, but on the bright side, think of the exciting world you just opened up to all of them. You should feel GREAT about that!
    Sheila N.

    When Thomas Edison invented the light bulb, he tried over 2000 experiments before he got it to work. A young reporter asked him how it felt to fail so many times. He said, "I never failed once. I invented the light bulb. It just happened to be a 2000 step process."

  23. #98
    Super Member QuiltingKrazy's Avatar
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    Way to go! I'm sure you left a great impression in their minds. That's all it takes, is one inspiring moment!
    Kudos to you!
    Lisa B in NC
    Quilting is my Happy Thought!
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  24. #99
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    It is a shame that kids are not taught the basics on how to take care of themselves anymore. There will be a time when these skills will be needed. I taught my two girls & son how to cook & sew & do crafts out of nothing but stuff around the house. They ended up teaching their kids how to cook & do crafts, but never got into the sewing bug. When my next to the oldest DGS was 8, he wanted me to teach him to sew. So we spent lots of weekends together. He was so tickled to be able to make all his Christmas gifts with G-Ma. One day in my sewing room we got to talking about music. I ask him if he wanted to hear some of my old songs when I was a teen. So I pulled out my old 45 records & he said "WOW G-Ma, I've never seen CD's that big before." LOL I also taught three GDS to sew & make quilts.

    I have a stepdaughter that her mother would not allow communication with while growing up. When she turned 18 we got in contact with her. Anyway, her mother didn't teach her how to cook or sew. When she got married & moved over seas with her DH, she would call me from there & ask me to guide her through cooking home made bread, egg noodles, etc. They just came back to the States last summer & we went to visit with them for the first time in 11 years & 4 kids later. She & the girls wanted to learn how to sew. Boy what fun that was. They have really taken to it & are sewing up a storm. She just sent me a purse she make me for Mothers Day. When she has a question, she calls & I guide her through it. So I am still being a long distant teacher & loving it.
    she said her DD #2 still brags to everyone that she got to sew with her G-Ma. Can hardly wait to get together with them again. Oh what fun we had at the fabric shop together too.

    So it was a great job for you to put an interest in the little ones to want to sew & be proud of something they made themselves.

  25. #100
    Super Member wvdek's Avatar
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    Those students are lucky to have a teacher who values the simple things in life that can bring so much pleasure and satisfaction. What you taught them will stay with them far longer than all the sports they become involved in.
    Kudos to you and I hope you continue to teach many students hereafter.

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