Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 34

Thread: I want to quilt my own

  1. #1
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,934

    I want to quilt my own

    Since I like to quilt so much but really can't afford to have all my tops quilted( I have several done) do any of you own a small quilting machine to do your own? How expensive are they? How easy to operate?

  2. #2
    Junior Member Gayle8675309's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Ashland, Wisconsin
    Posts
    170
    You can quilt large quilts on your home machine quite easily. There is a learning curve and you may not be happy with your first few quilts, but practice does improve results. Check out Leah Day on YouTube...she does beautiful free motion quilting on her home machine.

    I'm just learning to free motion quilt, but already I can see the improvement in my style after completing two quilts. It just takes time, but saves a LOT of money.

  3. #3
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    1,908
    Mine is a Gammill, which is kinda pricey but I think there's several out there that are more reasonable like the Bailey and some of the others made by other companies. Google longarm quilting machines and you should come up with a lot of info. And there's also the option of going with a used system...lots of bang for the (not so much) buck. Good luck!
    If you feel like you're special...it's 'cause you are!
    Momto5

  4. #4
    Junior Member dallen4350's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    277
    I just use my regular Brothers sewing machine. (7" throat). My BIL made a frame that allows the sewing machine to be moved over top of the quilt (almost like a long arm). The down side is that I can only quilt a strip of about 4-5 inches at a time... given the size of the throat of my sewing machine. So mostly I use a medium stippling or meandering. I am happy that for large quilts, I don't have to crawl on the floor to pin baste.
    Deb
    (If you are going to be a bear, you may as well be a grizzly.)

  5. #5
    Super Member Pat625's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    1,641
    I only have a regular sewing machine too. I hand quilt everything with the outline stitch. I just bought stencils and am going to try to hand quilt using those in the borders of my latest quilt. Not sure how it will come out, but looking forward to trying. Will look into the quilting with my regular machine

  6. #6
    Super Member lalaland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Yakima, WA
    Posts
    2,481
    I use my regular sewing machines (mechanical and computerized) for FMQ and I have a Brother 1500 with a 9" throat that I use exclusively for FMQ. I had the Inspria/Pfaff Grand Quilter set up for a while but it took up so much space, I finally sold it and now, when I have a big quilt, I put it on a big table and use my 1500. I have pretty good luck with the results.
    Thought for EVERY Day: You know all those things you've always wanted to do? You should go do them.

  7. #7
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    VIRGINIA
    Posts
    22,623
    I hand quilt most of mine if big i send them to my quilter
    QUILTNMO

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oh.
    Posts
    798
    Bailey Home Quilters are mid size arm machines at mid-size price. I have had my 13" machine 4 years now.
    You can get various types of frames, without spending a small fortune. Quilting space is enlarged by having a
    machine with a larger throat area. Bailey makes several sizes.

    http://www.baileyssewingcenter.com/h...l?src=overture

    June in Cincinnati

  9. #9
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Mableton, GA
    Posts
    8,481
    I have done some nice size quilts on my dinky Brother Mechanical basic machine. The king size one was a stitch in the ditch. A little tough to pull it through that small space, but, it was on point and I started in the middle and worked out so it wasn't impossible. Do check out Leah Day. She also has a website with videos - she shows how she puddles her big quilts on her domestic machine.

  10. #10
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Outside St. Louis
    Posts
    28,602
    I have a Juki TL 98QE and a BabyLock Jane, 9" throats and I can quilt any size quilt I want to. I bought a table for the Juki to sit in and having no extension table is no problem at all, Babylock Jane has an extension table.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  11. #11
    Senior Member sylviak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    southern Oklahoma
    Posts
    957
    You might also try the "quilt-as-you-go" method. There are several of them out there that quilt a block at a time or sections at a time and then join the blocks or sections.

  12. #12
    Power Poster sewnsewer2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    16,683
    I use my JukiTL98Q. I got mine from ebay new.
    Grandma of 5 beautiful grand kids, 4 crazy cats & 1 dog!

  13. #13
    Super Member newbee3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    1,859
    Blog Entries
    2
    I have a domestic and have fmq all of my quilts like the other lady said it can be done and it gets better with every one that you do.

  14. #14
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Mars
    Posts
    2,038
    I have all domestic sewing machines (except one industrial 31-15) and I quilt all my own quilts. Like someone else said, there's a learning curve and you won't be happy with your first few, but you catch on. And there's such a sense of accomplishment from having done it all yourself.

  15. #15
    QM
    QM is offline
    Power Poster QM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Northern California mountains
    Posts
    12,542
    Before my shoulder gave out, I did hundreds of quilts on my home machine. First, I was using a Bernina, Now I have a Janome. The Janome is easier to use because it has more quilting space (and a sturdier machine). Most of my quilting is free motion. I do one relatively small section at a time, then move to another. This one, for example, was about 105" square. You don't need to afford a LA to quilt a larger quilt. You do need some patience.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  16. #16
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southwest Kansas
    Posts
    4,829
    Quote Originally Posted by Maureen View Post
    Since I like to quilt so much but really can't afford to have all my tops quilted( I have several done) do any of you own a small quilting machine to do your own? How expensive are they? How easy to operate?
    You don't have to have a longarm. There's a ton of info on Leah Day's blog. She quilts on a regular machine.

    http://freemotionquilting.blogspot.com/

    Then check out Sharon Schamber's basting videos on youtube.

    Between the two you'll be able to baste and quilt any size quilt.

  17. #17
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    2,306
    Name:  SuperQuilter # 1.JPG
Views: 388
Size:  232.6 KB

    I started with this older table top frame. I used my mechanical Pfaff with about 5-6 inch throat. I have since upgraded to a mid arm and this frame is for sale. If interested PM me....

  18. #18
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    New York City/Manhattan
    Posts
    1,324
    When I first started quilting in 91, I used a 40+ year old Singer and completed several queens that way. Yes, there is a learning curve but I think it's worth it. Now, I have an HQ16 but only because it was my mother's posthumous gift to me.

  19. #19
    Senior Member kyquiltlover1942's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    420
    I have a voyager for about 4 years now. I love it. I think the new model is a little more, than I paid for mine. I have not had a minute's trouble with it that was not caused by "operator" error.

  20. #20
    Super Member caspharm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    6,911
    I currently have an Innova LA (which is easier to handle and less expensive than a Gammill - having rented a Gammill at my LQS). Before I was able to purchase it, I had taken excellent classes from Sue Rasmussen, Elizabeth Spannring, and Diane Gaudynski, who all do large quilts on their Bernina home machines and learned wonderful things. There is a learning curve on your home machine, but as everyone says, you can do it.

  21. #21
    Senior Member kellen46's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    805
    Quote Originally Posted by lalaland View Post
    I use my regular sewing machines (mechanical and computerized) for FMQ and I have a Brother 1500 with a 9" throat that I use exclusively for FMQ. I had the Inspria/Pfaff Grand Quilter set up for a while but it took up so much space, I finally sold it and now, when I have a big quilt, I put it on a big table and use my 1500. I have pretty good luck with the results.
    I also use a 1500pq for my quilting. that extra two inches makes all the difference and the thread cutter is nice as well.
    two simple rules for success
    1. Show up.
    2. Pay attention.
    One simple rule for happiness
    1. Kindness counts.

  22. #22
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    3,502
    i use my regular kenm ore sewing machine to FMQ mine , i just do it in sections, but i am saving for the HQ sweet 16 sit down quilting machine

  23. #23
    Senior Member Delilah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    314
    I recently finished quilting a very large, 108"x108", quilt on a Janone with a 9" throat. I did feathers, echoing, SID, flowers, vines, and more, mostly FMQ. It was tough doing the very center because I had to scrunch so much under the machine but it worked. It has taken me some time to get to this point and I started on projects that didn't mean a lot to me. The first one was one of my SIL's and the work was hideous. She gave it to a granddaughter and noone really cares how it looks. Start with small projects and simple designs and before you know it you'll be surprised at what you can do. BTW I do NOT use gloves or rubber tips or other aids to move the fabric, I use glycerine. A couple drops on your fingertips will give you all the friction you need to move your project and there is no harm to your fabric and your skin will love the glycerine. Any drug store will have a lifetime supply for $5 or less.
    OCD in the OC

  24. #24
    Senior Member Delilah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    314
    I recently finished quilting one that is 108"x108" on my Janone with a 9" throat using SID, feathers, echoing, flowers, vines, and more, mostly FMQ. It was tough doing the center because I had to scrunch so much under the machine. My first attempt was hideous but with practice, patience, and determination I am very happy with my efforts. Start with small projects using simple designs and before you know it you will be very surprised with the results. Not to mention the amount of satisfaction you will feel. BTW, I do NOT use gloves, rubber tips, or other aids to move the fabric, I use glycerine. A couple drops on your fingertips will give you all the friction you need to move your project, the glycerine is not harmful to your fabric and your skin will love the stuff. Any drug store will sell you a lifetime supply for $5 or less.Name:  #149 Generals Wives copy.jpg
Views: 196
Size:  1.83 MB
    OCD in the OC

  25. #25
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,700
    I just finished quilting a queen on my 55 year old Singer 401A. It was hard, but by having a table in front and one on the side I did just fine. It was slow going and my arms were sore, but I am pleased with the results.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.