Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 4 5
Results 101 to 117 of 117

Thread: If you owned a quilt store

  1. #101
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    ELVERTA, CA
    Posts
    15,173
    Blog Entries
    1
    My issues with some LQS has little to do with merchandise and much to do with employee attitudes. I want to go into an LQS and buy what I need. If it is "only" thread or a template, then that is either what I need or what I can afford. I have gotten "oh is this ALL?" as a response by a sales clerk. I have been ridiculed for my fabric choices in one store (it is no longer in business - hm, wonder why.....) I have been ignored and been given bad advice.

    So for me, it is the personality and behavior of the sales staff that determines whether I go back and give them my money.
    Martina
    Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Fabric!

  2. #102
    Super Member noveltyjunkie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    53 degrees North
    Posts
    1,668
    Blog Entries
    3
    And a coffee corner for people who have come a long way! (I think coffee is profitable too)

  3. #103
    Super Member laurafet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    1,991
    You hit it all. The only other thing I would add is to carry a variety of fabrics. My LQS (closest one) carries a lot of batiks which is great, and a ton of Kaffe Fassett. I like KF, but I don't love it. I do a variety of quilts, and may go from a civil war to a seaside to a kiddieprint to who knows what. I want to find that variety, and yes, that very often means more square footage, but also a lot more in impulse sales. I only go to that particular LQS maybe once or twice a year for that very reason. I have a few others to chose from, not to mention all the online stores with better pricing.

  4. #104
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Carolina
    Posts
    872
    Quote Originally Posted by trennag View Post
    I love the my LQS has tons of classes. The ladies are always so helpful and they have beautiful fabrics and notions. The owner is their often and very nice. They send out weekly emails\ news letters with all the latest info. they also do amazing coupon draws during sales or holidays. Keeps me coming back! Oh they also do a monthly Strip Club and i always look forward to see the New pattern they release.
    Sounds like Cozy Quilt Shop - I subscribe to her emails just so I can dream.

  5. #105
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Maine-ly Florida
    Posts
    3,452
    Quote Originally Posted by homebody323 View Post
    My dream shop was a 2 story log cabin with fireplace on the lower level and comfy chairs to sit and quilt in. Upstairs was open above the fireplace and the rest was classroom and bedrooms for retreats. Then I woke up and realized that to fulfill all your and my dreams there was a mountain of money, a ton of talented people each doing piecing, web sites, teaching, manning the cutting tables and a endless supply of energy on my part to keep it all going. Mom always said that the one thing that was free was dreaming. She was right!
    There was a little quilt in Maine on the way to Ellsworth in a log cabin. I thought it was just the perfect shop. The woman's husband built it for her near their home. She had great fabric at reasonable prices and a great setup for her own quilting with a flat screen on the wall. No fireplace. I was so sad when I found out it had closed and always wondered why.

  6. #106
    Super Member QandE2010's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Florida - formerly Montana
    Posts
    3,478
    Quote Originally Posted by homebody323 View Post
    My dream shop was a 2 story log cabin with fireplace on the lower level and comfy chairs to sit and quilt in. Upstairs was open above the fireplace and the rest was classroom and bedrooms for retreats. Then I woke up and realized that to fulfill all your and my dreams there was a mountain of money, a ton of talented people each doing piecing, web sites, teaching, manning the cutting tables and a endless supply of energy on my part to keep it all going. Mom always said that the one thing that was free was dreaming. She was right!
    I like your kind of quilt shop.
    Alma
    Nami to 6

  7. #107
    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    9,469
    Blog Entries
    31
    My turn! Being a business person first is the most important thing you can do to keep any business going. No matter what your selling.

    The things I like and have never seen in any store I have been in is:

    Good lighting

    A place to audition fabrics that you are choosing. So many times the only place to look at fabric groupings is by piling them on top of other fabric in an isle that other people are trying to use.

    Class equipment: I have been in classes where there was one broken iron and an ironing board that looked like it had been through a war. have enough heavy duty extension cords to handle a crowd. Cookies are great but I would rather be able to plug in my DSM that I dragged to class.

    Don't be setting up class while people are arriving to take the class. It looks so unprepaired.

    One LQS has the notions, thread and books along a wall in a classroom. Now really. Am I going to interupt a class so I can brows the notions and flip through the books. NO!

    Wide isles: enough said


    Understanding that space costs money and cramming as much stuff into every little inch of space you can, just looks messy and unfunctional. I don't really want to move ten bolts of fabric off of something I want to see.

    My perfect shop would be more like a B&B and general store or campus for quilters. I would live over top of the store and you could come and go as you pleased to use tables for cutting, sewing or marking quilts any time there wasn't a class, and there would be a back room for quilting bees on an old fashioned frame and a room with an assortment of longarms for rent. I may sell a few basic machines and leave those fancy ones for someone else to sell.

    fabrics would run through all styles from civil war repros to the modern large print florals

    My DH would repair and recondition treadle and vintage machines in the back of the house.

    There would be someone sewing most of the time. That would be part of the job. When you see it happening you get more interested.

    I would contract with local schools to have people from the art department intern at the shop and have free range to create whatever they want limited only by the rule that it mst be created from stuff at the shop and have art shows as special events for the community.

    There would be special discounted fabric corner for people who work on relief quilts to exchange finished quilts for fabric, batting and thread at minium cost.

    Enough for now. I'm exhausted!
    peace

    Oh! one more thing.

    There would be cloths lines in the side yard to hang a few quilts on for display where they could be seen. It would be like a small park with benches where passersby could enjoy a few minutes viewing the show.
    no act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. Aesop

  8. #108
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bosque County, Texas
    Posts
    3,028
    I think that perhaps a quilt shop might need to operate in conjunction with another store and feed customers off each other. Perhaps a gift shop, a book store, maybe a laundrymat - something to bring bring more occasional customers in and to help keep the profit/loss ratio in the plus side. After all, making money is the whole reason for a store.

    The only way I'll drop 10 pounds is to go shopping in England. - Maxine-

  9. #109
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    at the foot of the Ouichita Mountains, SE Oklahoma
    Posts
    272
    I agree about the machines...but I would add another. i am lusting after the New Horizon. I was just in my LQS today and bought material and stopped by to look at it again. As I went home, I thought, "If they gave a class on how to use that machine I bet they would sell a lot of them." What do you bet I'd be one of the purchasers.

    So I think they should advertise a sewing machine demo day or some such. At least I wish my LQS would.

  10. #110
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    140
    Yesterday a friend and I were in 3 quilt stores. She asked about a quilt kit since the quilt was displayed on the wall;
    the owner said the kit was $200+ the pattern is$30 and my friend was wondering why she sold it like that?
    So she didn't buy it. The second one....the help was eating their lunch and stopped when a lady brought in one
    of the workers' quilt she had quilted...it was really pretty and the quilter had done a great job; they never asked
    if we needed anything or was looking for something special....so we didn't buy anything there. the 3rd one didn't
    have the fabric I was looking for, but my friend bought 6 bobbins for her machine. I go to lots of different QS's in
    our state and I am looking for friendly help; new ideas, new fabrics. I love their samples and I can picture them in
    other colors...my friend cannot do that, so if she finds something she likes, she buys that fabric only. At the present
    I don't need any new projects...lol I just need time to sew. Everyone had some good ideas on here and it
    would make a great LQS.

  11. #111
    Senior Member captlynhall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    League City, Texas, USA
    Posts
    624
    Friendly, courteous, knowledgeable service it tops in my book. There are several LQS within 30 minutes of me, plus a Joann's and a Hancocks, so I have choices. I would love to see any and all of them carry a good selection of 100% cotton hand quilting thread. If they have any at all, it is usually in one or two neutral colors. I have to load up once a year at Festival to get a variety of colors. Also, the staff needs to know what they are selling. I had one young lady, when I asked for a certain brand of between quilting needles, offer me a package of large embroidery needles. Then another lady was helping me with thread selection. I wanted a variegated thread and preferred hand quilting thread. No such luck with that, but after selling me only 100% cotton fabrics, I failed to notice she sold me rayon thread. As a somewhat newbie quilter, I hope to get help with my questions and advise from those more experienced than me. I was fortunate enough to run in to one of the quilt teachers at the same shop on day when buying fabric. I needed someone to tell me how much of each fabric I needed for the quilt I was going to make. She not only jumped right in and helped me with that, she gave me a short-cut sheet on dealing with 1/2 square triangles. I wound up about a year later taking a class with her. I did not forget how helpful she was.
    When a dying man asked his pastor "How long does it take to die?" his pastor's heartfelt reply was "A lifetime." Live life to the fullest, but stop now and then to enjoy the sunset.
    Lynda

  12. #112
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    788
    Blog Entries
    2
    Everyones ideas are great! Could you even imagine if we had one shop that had all of these things in it? Wow, what fun we would have going there.
    One of the LQS that I go to have a customer rebate program. For every dollar you spend a certain percentage goes into a "kitty" for you. You can spend it back right away or save up an spend on a larger purchase. This actually makes me feel like they really appreciate your business and of course it always makes you go back.

  13. #113
    Super Member seamstome's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    1,338
    I have to say, we have some great quilt stores to shop at. And I do enjoy several of the shops in my area and most of them incorporate the ideas that are on this thread.

    I have been in a LQS in a cabin. I cant remember where it was, maybe KY, but although it was cool, it was very cramped.

    I especially like the audition table concept also.

  14. #114
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    243
    I walk into LQS and see beautiful quilts hanging on the wall; when I ask about the fabric I always get---we are out of it====and vinegar face. Why does the owner always use the fabric and no else can buy any like she used? I would like to walk in see a quilt and find the fabric used for the quilt on the shelf and buy it. Most of the quilts are twin size or wall hanging; so making a queen size would not infringe on her wanting the only one like it in world. Plus-- I like a smiling face and someone saying Hi- have fun; let me know if I can help you.

  15. #115
    Super Member seamstome's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    1,338
    The one poster noted that all the samples would eat into your profits....my LQS has a sample sale once a year and sells them--mostly to non-quilters but I am sure they make their money back because they are tagged for a couple hundred a piece.

    Staffing does cost money and we are obviously not discussing a one woman show here.

    Yes I am aware there are minimums. I worked in retail when I was younger and run a business now. But that doesn't mean you can't buy through a cooperative or have a class or a sample that highlights the product or run a sale.

    Would I move fabric at $0 profit to get it out the door...dang right I would. Because a "dead" bolt setting there is doing me no good and is taking up square footage which is even more expensive--at least in my business.

    It is expensive and hard work to own any business, let alone small business retail, but done right you can make it successful. I know I appreciate the creativity of the LQS owners who are doing all of these things.

  16. #116
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    864
    Quote Originally Posted by TanyaL View Post
    I think that perhaps a quilt shop might need to operate in conjunction with another store and feed customers off each other. Perhaps a gift shop, a book store, maybe a laundrymat - something to bring bring more occasional customers in and to help keep the profit/loss ratio in the plus side. After all, making money is the whole reason for a store.
    Agreed, and a good possibility might be a hardware and/or woodworking store, so the husbands would have something to do while the wives are shopping for fabric.

  17. #117
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    6,117
    Blog Entries
    1
    There's a Sportsman's Warehouse next door to the Joann's in my town. Too bad I don't shop at Joann's.

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 4 5

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.