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Thread: Invisable thread

  1. #1
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    Invisable thread

    I have never used invisible thread. I want to use it for satin stitch applique. Is there anything I should know about it before I start?

  2. #2
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    I like using invisible thread. My machine has no problems with it.

    I'd test it on a practice piece first. I have a hard time picturing satin stitch looking good with invisible thread. Satin stitch generally closes a raw edge, and you'd see through the thread, and I feel like it would have a plasticity looking build up. Maybe not though- that's why you should test.

  3. #3
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I use lots of it , but would not use it for satin stitch. That much thread used in a satin stitch ... it would not be so invisible. Think about using a blanket stitch and shorten the "bite", it would be much more "invisible.

  4. #4
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    The invisible thread I have used for machine applique is YLI's nylon monofilament .003. This thread would never be used for satin stitching, though. Usually satin stitching is done with cotton or polyester thread. Although I have a spool of polyester invisible thread, I cannot imagine using it for satin stitching either. The stitching would become very hard.

    At the very least, try whatever invisible thread it is that you have on a sample piece first to make sure you will like it.

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    If not satin stitch, how would you machine applique to keep edges from fraying?

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    Super Member rusty quilter's Avatar
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    I would use a matching cotton thread for satin stitching--or use interfacing to finish the edges, then use the invisible thread to top stitch the applique.

  7. #7
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Are you doing fusible applique? People use a variety of edge finishes on fusible. Most do not use satin stitch (even with cotton or polyester threads) because satin stitch creates a really hard edge. Many use either a small zigzag or a blanket-type stitch. The edges are partially exposed but may not fray -- depending on type of fusible used. What fusible are you using?

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    Whenever I use invisible thread, I only use it in the top thread. The bobbin is a good quality cotton thread, and I use a small zig zag stitch. The fusible keeps the edges from fraying. I think a satin stitch would be too stiff and tight and wouldn't look good. Make sure you make a sample to make sure this is the look you want.
    Sue

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    Many people stitch a straight stitch about 1/8 inside of fused appliqué pieces for raw edge appliqué. This is used frequently in art quilts or wallhangings. I would not recommend a satin stitch with invisible thread. If you want to cover the raw edge with satin stitch, I would recommend you use something like Gutermann Sulky for a pretty satin stitch or similar.

  10. #10
    Senior Member ArlaJo's Avatar
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    I used a satin stitch and you are all right. It left a hard edge. Glad it was a mug rug, I was experimenting, and I won't do it again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    Are you doing fusible applique? People use a variety of edge finishes on fusible. Most do not use satin stitch (even with cotton or polyester threads) because satin stitch creates a really hard edge. Many use either a small zigzag or a blanket-type stitch. The edges are partially exposed but may not fray -- depending on type of fusible used. What fusible are you using?
    I am using steam a seam. I want to make the happy daisy quilt, and I was thinking I could use invisible thread to eliminate the many different thread colors> I want to make the quilt a queen size, using as many different colors as I could.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    Are you doing fusible applique? People use a variety of edge finishes on fusible. Most do not use satin stitch (even with cotton or polyester threads) because satin stitch creates a really hard edge. Many use either a small zigzag or a blanket-type stitch. The edges are partially exposed but may not fray -- depending on type of fusible used. What fusible are you using?
    I am using steam a seam. I want to make the happy daisy quilt, and I was thinking I could use invisible thread to eliminate the many different thread colors> I want to make the quilt a queen size, using as many different colors as I could.

  13. #13
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    I use invisible thread for applique all the time- I use a small blanket stitch most of the time- once in a while I choose a small zigzag- but never satin stitch- it Is not a good choice for satin stitch- a satin stitch is a very heavy stitch- which I never use for applique- but some people do- with a thread in a coordinating color- since it really stands out & stiffens the applique edge.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  14. #14
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by donnai View Post
    I am using steam a seam. I want to make the happy daisy quilt, and I was thinking I could use invisible thread to eliminate the many different thread colors> I want to make the quilt a queen size, using as many different colors as I could.
    It's fine to use invisible thread for this; it's using the satin stitch with invisible thread that you won't like. Make a few sample shapes and try different stitches to see what you like. Some of the most common are (1) narrow zigzag, (2) blanket stitch, (3) hem stitch, (4) straight stitch inside the applique shape, or (5) other decorative stitch such as a feather stitch.

    If you Google "machine applique stitches" and then click on "images", you can see photos of different ways quilters finish fusible edges. You can use any of these -- with the exception of satin stitch -- with invisible thread.

  15. #15
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    I'd go with a smallish zig zag with invisible thread for a bed quilt.

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    I am with Prism99, post #15. I learned in a couple classes that when it comes to using invisible thread, the better choice is polyester over nylon. It has something to do with the heat from the iron....nylon does not hold up well.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by donnai View Post
    If not satin stitch, how would you machine applique to keep edges from fraying?
    You can turn the edges over. I cut my pieces 1/8 to 1/4 inch bigger than I need them to be and turn the edges down with a glue stick. Then I don't have to worry about fraying.

    Or, if I'm using a fusible, I just don't worry about it. Unless it is washed a lot, there is generally very little visible fraying. I use a light zig zag or a blanket stitch.

    Or, if you want satin stitch, use a coordinating color- it becomes part of the design element.

  18. #18
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    thank you for your suggestins. I guess I won't be doing satin stitches. You are all so helpfull

  19. #19
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    I have used a very small zigzag stitch, not satin stitch and it was fine, just play with your settings, are you doing raw edge or freezer paper, that will make the difference on the fraying
    Brother (XL-3500i, CV3550, SQ-9050, Dreamweaver XE6200D), Juki MO-2000QVP, Handiquilter Avante

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