Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 48 of 48

Thread: Keeping fabric edges together on long seams

  1. #26
    Super Member duckydo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Pleasant Hill MO
    Posts
    1,675
    Blog Entries
    1
    That is a great tip, I will try it next time I have long strips to sew, because if you are too speedy you can lose your accuracy. Thanks

  2. #27
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Mechanicsville, IA
    Posts
    1,488
    I prefer to cut strips from the lengthwise grain whenever possible and work with shorter lengths that are divisible be the size of blocks I need, usually around 20". I still pin a few places to make sure things are straight. When working with crosswise grain I usually cut the strip in half. This is just what is easiest for me. Possibly a hold over from years of garment sewing.
    Cheryl Robinson
    http://www.silverneedlestitching.com
    APQS Millenium Longarm with Intelliquilter

  3. #28
    Senior Member kellen46's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    805
    This is a technique used in industrial sewing. They do not use a walking foot, just this simple manipulation of fabric. I saw it done once and have ever since used it on all seams over six inches in length. Stretching is not a issue.
    two simple rules for success
    1. Show up.
    2. Pay attention.
    One simple rule for happiness
    1. Kindness counts.

  4. #29
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,831
    You could always use your walking foot which is designed to keep the fabrics together and they will come out even at the end of a long strip.

  5. #30
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    8,243
    Quote Originally Posted by miss_ticky2 View Post
    I don't think she meant that we hold the ENDS of the fabric...but probably a comfortable distance from the machine. And then reposition as we go...right hand on the bottom fabric and left hand on the top fabric and line them up as you go.
    I agree with above......no stretch, just gently hold and guide the fabric and I find not going 90 mpr on the speed dial certainly helps with accuracy......saves on using glue???......

  6. #31
    Super Member MaggieLou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Statesville, NC
    Posts
    1,469
    I just run the bottom fabric between my first and second fingers and the top fabric between my thumb and first finger. It seems to work for me.
    Margaret

    "If the devil could dance in empty pockets, he'd have a ball in mine."

    Life is a coin. You can spend it any way you wish but you can only spend it once.

  7. #32
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Englewood, CO
    Posts
    530
    I'm gonna have to try this. Wish I had heard of this before I did all the strip piecing for the rail fence type quilt I'm currently working on. It would have been so much easier/quicker.

  8. #33
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    1,005
    Blog Entries
    4
    This is interesting. I have pinned strips together (and I do mean lots of pins )and still have one of the ends come out longer. Still can't figure out why it keeps happening. May give this a try.

  9. #34
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    12,237
    Blog Entries
    1
    I would definitely use it only for sewing strips together, not for adding borders. Borders really need to be pinned.

    I'm thinking the method would work great for Jelly Roll Race Quilts. Just not sure how well it will work once the pieces get wide.

  10. #35
    QM
    QM is offline
    Power Poster QM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Northern California mountains
    Posts
    12,541
    I generally don't pin long straight seams. Often, I gently align the 2 pieces with the bottom one resting on my middle finger, the top on my pointer, keeping barely taut, not pulling.

  11. #36
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Madison, Ohio
    Posts
    226
    Blog Entries
    1
    I've been doing this for years and wouldn't think of using pins!! Yes, it is a great method!! I've never had a problem with stretching. .....Now....."with pins" - I have lots of problems so that's why I don't use pins anymore.

  12. #37
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    6,763
    I saw this technique on one of the quilting shows we USED TO get (but can't get anymore). I'm not sure who showed it -- perhaps Clothilde or Mary Ellen Hopkins. I've tried it, but I've got "two left hands" -- if you know what I mean. So I'm a pinner/slight stretcher and it usually works out.
    One step at a time, always forward.

  13. #38
    Super Member MaryStoaks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    La Quinta, CA
    Posts
    3,925
    Quote Originally Posted by moreland View Post
    I attended a class at a retreat this week and the lady told us how to keep the edges of long seams together. Why hadn't I heard this before in the 69 years that I have been sewing?????
    Anyway she told us to hold the bottom fabric with our right hand and to hold the top fabric with our left hand as you match up the edges and then feed the fabric into the sewing machine. I can't believe how easy it is to have edges perfectly matched! Thought maybe I wasn't the only "old timer" or new sewer for that matter, that had not heard of this tip.
    I seldom attend a class but what some tip or technique is taught that is new to me. Isn't learning new things great! I love it.
    This is how I do it, I never really thought about it before.
    Mary

  14. #39
    Super Member Pat G's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Western Arizona
    Posts
    1,913
    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider View Post
    Sounds too easy to stretch the edges that way to me. I'm glad you're so happy with it, but I'll stick with pinning for ease and acuracy.
    I remember hearing this a long time ago but haven't remembered to use it. As for stretch, I think you have to hold enough fabric in ea. hand to avoid a stretch.

  15. #40
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,661
    Blog Entries
    2
    The way I was taught to sew long strips is to hold the top strip up off the bottom strip until it goes under the needle. This feeds the top strip the same as the bottom and keeps the edges matched almost automatically. If the strip is long enough I toss it over my shoulder (jelly roll race quilt sewing).
    Got fabric?

  16. #41
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Leamington, Ontario
    Posts
    46
    I will keep pinning as well.

  17. #42
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Southern Ky
    Posts
    217
    That is the way we held our long seams at the sewing factory.

  18. #43
    Super Member Kitsie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Ridgefield WA
    Posts
    6,661
    Blog Entries
    41
    I totally agree with you! Especially when sewing the binding to the top. I only pin a foot at a time as I go. It lays completely flat and I've never had a pucker or wrinkle that way.

    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    I don't pin when sewing long strips together, but I do stop about every 10 inches or so to re-position. Next time I have long strips to sew together, I will try the two-hand method! Since the strips are cut on-grain, stretching shouldn't be a problem as long as I am careful to simply guide the strips and not place stress on them.
    http://s1248.photobucket.com/albums/hh485/KitsieH/
    Never regret growing older, its a privilege denied to many.
    Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle.

    Kitsie

  19. #44
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    s.cal
    Posts
    2,071
    Blog Entries
    1
    i go both ways on this too, pin or not, but thank you for sharing this tip will try it soon
    we can make our plans but the out come is in god,s hands nellie diaz

  20. #45
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    12,237
    Blog Entries
    1
    To some extent, I think it depends on the specific sewing machine also. I have seen machines that seem to feed very unevenly, with the feed dogs pushing through much more fabric than the presser foot allows. My Bernina, even though it does not have the accufeed feature (built-in walking foot), seems to feed very evenly. That may be why I've never had much of a problem with uneven feeding of strips or "bending" of long strips from stretched fabric.

    So, the two-handed strip feed may work better on some machines than others. It may not all be user-dependent!

  21. #46
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Here and there
    Posts
    1,661
    I haven't pinned a long seam for more than 30 years. Never stretched any fabric cut on the grain and I haven't bled on any fabric for a long time. Knock on wood. froggyintexas
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    I pull mine taut but not enough to stretch the fabric...been doing this for 20 yrs and never a stretching problem

  22. #47
    Super Member jeanharville's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Saratoga, Arkansas
    Posts
    1,898
    I found this demo on how to do this, but you have to watch closely what she does with her right hand.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=KB6QUWcOcOY
    jean

  23. #48
    Super Member moreland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Manhattan, Kansas
    Posts
    2,167
    I have enjoyed reading all the comments this has brought. It was interesting to find out this is an "industrial" way of sewing long pieces together.
    The lady who told us about this just off handedly said "you should be doing all your seams like this"--that's when I realized I wanted to update my methods.
    God Bless,
    Rachel

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.