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Thread: Kid friendly Machine???

  1. #26
    Super Member Kathy N's Avatar
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    I bought my grandaughter the Hello Kitty machine. She is 7. She has had no problem at all with it. I have the equivalent in the Janome Gem and it works beautifully too. Very light weight and easy to handle. You can buy on ebay for a very reasonable price. However, if you buy through your local dealer, you can get free lessons for her.

  2. #27
    Super Member Carol W's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CloverPatch
    I sat her down on my machine this afternoon. That took some prodding, thankyou! Don't know what scares me more her breaking my machine or her fingers! That was till I was reminded of speed control!

    She is doing Okay, and loving it. Telling her little sister who is 6. "I can't play I must go quilt now"

    We are putting together 4.5" blocks 10 strips of 8
    I looked online at the janome, thinking about going to our shop here in town, then maybe also to sears. I agree with yall, a full size would probally be best. I only like to buy something once!
    When you go to your LQS, you might ask about trade - ins or refurbished machines that they might have.

  3. #28
    Senior Member CompulsiveQuilter's Avatar
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    Don't even BOTHER with a "kid machine" - I bought the Hello Kitty machine for my 3 - yes 3 - year old grandaughter and it doesn't even have a bobbin or a foot pedal! And threading the needle required a magnifier and a pair of tweezers (I'm not kidding)> I bought her a Singer "easy stitch" from target for 25 bucks (same price as Hello Kitty) and preached about keeping her finger from the needle. She's sewing happily and safely.

  4. #29
    Super Member girlsfour's Avatar
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    You could buy a Janome Sew Mini. Adults even use these small machines. Watch Hancock Fabrics as they are on sale quite often for $49.99, even a couple of times a year they are $39.99. There are some other Janome's at Hancock Fabrics for roughly $89. on sale. They thread easy and are great for young sewers. Stay away from the more inexpensive Brother machines unless you try them. I have compared them, they are difficult to thread and don't run the smoothest.

    And like someone else said, Janome makes Sears so they may have a comparable model...

  5. #30
    Senior Member patsyo56721's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CloverPatch
    My eldest daughter(Anna 13) uses my maching an ellure plus.
    I have a soon to be 8 yr old (Eimly) that is interested in what Im doing. I waited till Anna was 12 before I let her sew, and it was on a Singer from the 70's.

    My old Singer, has issues.
    I have read on here about how some of you are letting your girls about Emilys age sew already and that they do well.
    She wants to sew, and I am attaching her "quilt" that she taped together from my scraps.
    My question is there a kid friendly machine that works well?
    I have seen the Hello Kitty ones, but I worry that I am paying for the license on the character and not getting a quality machine.
    Part of me is scared to death to let her quilt. What if she loses a finger! LOL I know, overbearing. But I don't want to miss this oppurtunity to catch her while she is really interested in this hobby.
    I got each of my grandaughters a Baby Lock BL9 for Christmas 2009. It was on sale for $99. and has several stitches. Again this Christmas 2010 it was again on sale. I believe the regular price is $129.00. It is also a good machine to take to sewing classes...

  6. #31
    Member I Herd Ewe's Avatar
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    Please get her a nice quality real machine. I bought a cheap sewing machine when I was in college and made a few things but I hated sewing with the machine. I loved hand sewing but nothing worked well for me on the machine. I thought it was me and gave up machine sewing for the next 20 years. Then, when my youngest daughter started sewing in 4-H (age 5), I took her to a 4-H meeting with the old machine and the instructor told me "Let her use my machine. She will hate sewing if she tries to learn on your machine." I went and bought a good machine for her and now, not only does she love sewing (now age 16), I also love sewing on that machine! We often start out on a new craft buying cheap poor quality equipment because we want to save money in case we don't continue in the craft. Having no experience with good equipment, we are frustrated trying to learn and give up because we don't enjoy it. Start her with good equipment even if you have to borrow it. (My daughter borrowed a machine from that wonderful 4-H leader for those first couple years while I saved money to buy the machine we now use.)

  7. #32
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    My daughter about had a stroke when I allowed my grandaughter who was about 9 to sew on my new Bernina. I had an old Singer but it was tempermental and wanted her to have a good experience. I supervised closely at first and then when she had a good feel for the machine and how to use it safely, turned her loose. She was very creative and was so proud when she'd come upstairs with a bag she'd designed in hand or some other project. Also gave her free rein on a box of scraps an inexpensive material. She sews now and I eventually gave her my old Bernina when I got a new one. I agree that you should let them sew when they are interested.

  8. #33
    Super Member GladGrams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DawnMarie
    Since she is 8, I would start her on a full-size machine. It won't be long and she'll out grow the little one. Since she is enthusiastic about it, she should catch on quickly.
    I agree wholeheartedly. My grandsons (10 & 7) were given full size "used machines" and they had no problems at all. In fact, being mechanically inclined they picked up the whole "thread a machine" without being taught.

  9. #34
    Junior Member QuiltingrandmafromMi's Avatar
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    I think she should sew if she is showing interest. I was taking a sewing class when I was 7. Amazon.com has a Brother LS2125 for $59.99 plus free shipping. I would go with something like that! I would have killed for a machine of my own when I was 8. Go for it!
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  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by CloverPatch
    My eldest daughter(Anna 13) uses my maching an ellure plus.
    I have a soon to be 8 yr old (Eimly) that is interested in what Im doing. I waited till Anna was 12 before I let her sew, and it was on a Singer from the 70's.

    My old Singer, has issues.
    I have read on here about how some of you are letting your girls about Emilys age sew already and that they do well.
    She wants to sew, and I am attaching her "quilt" that she taped together from my scraps.
    My question is there a kid friendly machine that works well?

    I just bought my granddaughter a janome mini off Craig's list. She is 7 years old. I think this machine will last her for quite awhile. When she graduates to a larger machine, I can still use this one for piecing
    I have seen the Hello Kitty ones, but I worry that I am paying for the license on the character and not getting a quality machine.
    Part of me is scared to death to let her quilt. What if she loses a finger! LOL I know, overbearing. But I don't want to miss this oppurtunity to catch her while she is really interested in this hobby.

  11. #36
    mjorgenson's Avatar
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    Don't get an old used machine. A new cheaper one is better because you won't have as many issues with it. That is the quickest way to turn a kid off from sewing is to have to fight a machine. A Janome Jem Platinum is a good way to start in on a computer machine at a good price,

  12. #37

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    My granddaughter got introduced to sewing machines early. At about 4 she would sit on my lap and sew. By 6 she was running my Kenmore. When I bought my Janome 6600P I took her with me and she prefers that now. She is 11 and loved the decorative stitches and thread painting and knows when she needs to rip out stitches. I say go as good as you can afford. I heard about a Brother recently that you can usually buy at Walmart or on Amazon.com for just under 200.00. Unfortunately I don't have the model number but it got great reviews. It has alot of decorative stitches, letters for monograming (she made a collar with a name on it for a stuffed animal). It has needle up/down option! I looked at local Walmart and they had it! I will be getting this for her 12th birthday as they are moving away. The kids today are way more tech saavy. I am going to go through some mending with her and a few more projects so when she moves she can take off and do what she wants. The one thing I did was tell her. If you have a question about how it is working ask me. And if it is not doing what it is suppose to - stop.
    Diane/Wyoming
    PS I have a Janome Jem and I am getting rid of it because none of us like to use it. I have it sold. It sews awesome but there is no 'creative' stitching as the stitches are preset. If they are working on a thread painting project there is not much room because of the harp space.

  13. #38

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    When teaching my GD to sew I told her to keep her fingers out of the feed plate area to begin with. I was always nearby but locked my lips. A couple of small projects and it is more about her learning to trust her knowledge base. Teach her how to clean her machine. I used beginner color book pages (printed off the internet). for her to follow with out thread. There are a couple of good books out there for assistance. She even did an awesome job on a pillowcase.
    Diane/Wyoming

  14. #39
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    Four of my GD's made doll quilts wile I was in NC over Christmas and they used my Janome that I took with me. If they are going to sew may as well learn it right. However. If I had an inexpesive machine I would probably have used that instead. Unlike many of you I only have the one. I will post pictures just as soon as I locate them.

  15. #40
    Super Member Leota's Avatar
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    If you can find a good feather weight machine it will last her forever and it sew slow enough for a young child. I would emphasize hand placement when sewing to decrease the chance of finger sewing ... I taught my granddaughter to sew when she was 4 years old on the sewing machine... she learned the safety rules first...
    Has not sewn her fingers yet and she's 12.

  16. #41
    Power Poster Annaquilts's Avatar
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    Janome Gem I have 14 children and about as many machines (many vintage) but this little machine is what I teach them on. I assume you are teaching them quilting. My youngest is currently just nine. The youngest I taught was 3 and she is now an excellent quilter at 13.

    The Janome Gem is a 3/4 size machine but you can free motion on it, use a walking foot, piece with a quarter inch foot. I have 5 friends that use the Janome Gem as their main machine for quilting and they never bought a full size machine because they feel they do not need it. They made beautiful quilts on it up to Queen size.

  17. #42
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    WHAT you start her on really isn't that critical as long as it is simple and reliable. Nothing will turn her off faster than birds nests or machine problems when she is "getting into" it. I recommend a featherweight or other basic machine with simple forward/reverse. There is not much she can do wrong on a good OLD singer.

  18. #43
    Senior Member Sharonsews's Avatar
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    My 9 year old friend sews on my Brother Project Runway without any problems.

  19. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by CloverPatch
    My eldest daughter(Anna 13) uses my maching an ellure plus.
    I have a soon to be 8 yr old (Eimly) that is interested in what Im doing. I waited till Anna was 12 before I let her sew, and it was on a Singer from the 70's.

    My old Singer, has issues.
    I have read on here about how some of you are letting your girls about Emilys age sew already and that they do well.
    She wants to sew, and I am attaching her "quilt" that she taped together from my scraps.
    My question is there a kid friendly machine that works well?
    I have seen the Hello Kitty ones, but I worry that I am paying for the license on the character and not getting a quality machine.
    Part of me is scared to death to let her quilt. What if she loses a finger! LOL I know, overbearing. But I don't want to miss this oppurtunity to catch her while she is really interested in this hobby.
    PLEASE LET US KNOW WHAT YOU DECIDE.
    Diane/Wyoming

  20. #45
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    I would find a used decent machine for your gd to sew on. I bought a Singer 99 for $25.00 which had been a trade in. I made a stopper pad to keep the machine at a lower speed. (This machine was built in the 30's when there was no adjustable speed other than your foot.) Both of the girls are now married and have much newer faster machines. I keep the old Singer and teach girl scouts how to sew using the old machine. It has sure been a "Keeper"

  21. #46
    Bev
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    Quote Originally Posted by CloverPatch
    I forgot about speed control. My Babylock has it. I don't use it, LOL, it is set to FAST FAST FAST.

    I know she could use my machine, BUT I already share my machine with Anna. I so hate having to wait my turn! Then change out the thread, yada yada yada. I figured it would be easier on everybody if there was a second machine, primarily for the kids.
    Speed control is definitly a feature I need to look for. Thank you I would have never thought to check on that.
    My granddaughter, age 8, just finished her very first quilt, a one-patch, very simple. I taught her how to use my Janome Jem Platinum 760. I also have a Jem Gold which she has used. The reason I switched her to the 760 is that it has the speed control. Without that she has a bit of a problem controlling her speed, she says her foot is too heavy;). If you can get a machine that is uncomplicated and has a speed control, AND doesn't cost a whole lot, she'd be better off.

  22. #47
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    I have let my 7year old GD sew on an old Bernina sport that we bought at a school auction. It is a very simple, easy to use machine with only a few extra stitches. It was well made, easy to thread, and sews nicely. She is cautious about getting her fingers close to the needle, which is very important. I don't let her use the rotary cutter yet, I do all her cutting for the blocks. We started on pot holders, coasters, and lastly a doll quilt. She loved doing the machine quilting because she could go a little faster than I allowed on the quarter inch seams. If a child is interested, I'd let them do some sewing, with you very close and watching. Don't let them loose interest by putting them off for too long. My GD doesn't sew for a long period of time when she does sew, she says she get tired and needs a break, so it will take a while to complete a project, but I encourage her and she thinks she is great stuff! The young ones need a lot of patience and supervision from us, but they will carry on the art and pleasure of quilting.

  23. #48
    Super Member Quiltbeagle's Avatar
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    You can buy the 'adult' version of the Hello Kitty machine and just put removable Hello Kitty stickers on it.

  24. #49
    Senior Member Quilter Day-by-Day's Avatar
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    My SIL just got her daughter a Janome it has a daffadil on the front dont remember the #. She is twelve though but had never sewn before and is doing good.

  25. #50
    Junior Member Quilted Nana's Avatar
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    One of the inexpensive Brothers from Walmart will be good and last her a while. I use one I bought to take to classes because they are light to tote around. It can be a good starter to keep for the up and coming new sewers.

    My 4 yr old GGson is already interested in sewing. I plan to get him started on this one.

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