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Thread: Knit Fabric

  1. #1
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    Knit Fabric

    Is there any way that you can use knit fabric in a quilt. I have yards and yards of top quality knit fabric that I wanted to donate to the Linus Project but I was told that they don't accept it. I don't know what to do with it. I don't want it because I have had it for a while and have reached an age where I no longer sew clothing but concentrate on quilting. I would appreciate any suggestions. Thank you ladies. Busy Lizzie

  2. #2
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    Absolutely you can; I was in my 20's before I realized that quilts could be made of materials other than heavy polyester knits and old jeans.

    It is trickier to work with knits, so I would keep the pattern simple. I've never tried it, but I don't imagine the corners working out nicely on half square triangles, so I would stick with squares and rectangles. Since you have experience with garment sewing, I don't think it would be beyond your abilities.

    Good luck!

  3. #3
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    I sewed squares of polyester double knit into a quilt more then 40 years ago. It is the quilt that went camping, to ball games and picnics. You just can't wear them out. It has a polyester batt in it and I just quilted down the seams with my regular sewing machine foot. I did use larger 1/2 seam construction instead of 1/4 inch.

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    What kind of knit fabric do you have?

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    I get a lot of knit fabric given to me. I just recycle it to the local thrift shop. I believe such fabric is more trouble to work with than worth. I have serged some and made receiving type blankets that went overseas. Think about the aggravation in working with it.

  6. #6
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    Cotton doublknit makes wonderful receiving blankets.

  7. #7
    Power Poster oksewglad's Avatar
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    I was wondering if it could be used as backing...it's usually 54-60" wide and usually has a soft feel to it. I am going to try it for some charity kids quilts.
    Don't worry spider.
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    About 40 years ao, I made 2 quilts out of a single knit fabric, polyester batting in both and a flannel for the backing. One of them has been on my bed every winter since. I have had to replace the backing and the batting on it once. I tied both of these quilts, Oh, the pieces were 4 inch squares, that I bought by the pound at that time. This is one of the warmest quilts I have. I had no idea what I was doing at the time, but it worked out.

  9. #9
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    Fleece is a knit, and I have used that several times. With fleece, I found that using batting with the fleece makes it quilt/look much better. I have used a thick cotton knit as backing on one quilt as well.

    It was quilted on a long arm/frame. I found that I had to place the backing on the frame so that my machine would be primarily sewing in the least stretchy direction. It seems to me that a very thin knit would be difficult to work with, though.

    I wonder how those knits would work as a batting? The top and the backing would secure it once it is quilted.
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

  10. #10
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    If it seems stretchy just use pins to sew the seams, use 1/2". I would probably make larger squares, about 8" - 12".
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  11. #11
    Power Poster oksewglad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cathyvv View Post
    Fleece is a knit, and I have used that several times. With fleece, I found that using batting with the fleece makes it quilt/look much better. I have used a thick cotton knit as backing on one quilt as well.

    It was quilted on a long arm/frame. I found that I had to place the backing on the frame so that my machine would be primarily sewing in the least stretchy direction. It seems to me that a very thin knit would be difficult to work with, though.

    I wonder how those knits would work as a batting? The top and the backing would secure it once it is quilted.
    I used fleece on a baby quilt a couple of weeks ago and put the back on as you suggested. I had very little stretching. I used no batting and could tell that it would have benefited from something in between, but it was what I call a utility quilt. Maybe I should have used a piece of single knit in between.
    Don't worry spider.
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  12. #12
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    T shirt quilts are knits, and there are tons of those being made. I agree with cutting square or rectangular shapes only, and back the knit with the appropriate interfacing... such as French Fuse tricot interfacing is used for T shirts.

    Using it for a backing sounds like a good idea, as the quilt front will help stabilize it. I'd spray baste it well, to forego the need for interfacing in this application.

    I've made many receiving blankets from simple big squares of knits, sewn around the edges and then "birthed" right side out. Then I topstitch about 1/4" from the edges, all around. Just two layers of knits makes a nice, stretchy blanket, great for swaddling.
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  13. #13
    Super Member QuiltingNinaSue's Avatar
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    I inherited a bunch of knit blocks, sewn in a nine patch and four patch. Our neighbor has a grandchild with MS learning to sew, so I donated them to her. Knits are fun to sew, no fraying or unraveling of threads andand the 1/4 seam works great. Yes, they stretch on a bias cut and a slight zig zag stitch will work then. Love to work with them. they tend to 'stick' to one another like cotton when sewing two together. Or you can serge them together for a quick throw quilt. You have a great treasure to work with in knits. Of course, I am of the older generation that appreciates them and loves them.

  14. #14
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    I just finished 7 lap quilts made with 6 inch polyester squares that were headed to the dumpster. Someone gave me the box full. I used some knit fabric that I had for the backs and they turned out great. A local church makes lots of quilts and uses anything they are given. I've given them lots of large pieces of knit that someone brought to our group sew. They were all headed to the dumpster if I didn't take them.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  15. #15
    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
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    I am keeping mine and want someday to make rugs out of the knit. I don't know how to do this?
    Suzanne
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