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Thread: Long arm time?

  1. #1
    Super Member colleen53's Avatar
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    What is the average amount of time a long arm quilter has your quilt?

  2. #2
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    Most long-arm quilters will give you a turnaround time. It can be very short, or it can be a long time for quilters that are in great demand.

  3. #3
    Senior Member ClairVoyantQuilter's Avatar
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    Two or three weeks usually. I always ask for an estimate . . .and of course it depends on how busy they are . . .some times, during the busiest times of year, the amount of time can be more. I always figure, if I need it for a specific date, I need to plan accordingly :)

  4. #4
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClairVoyantQuilter
    Two or three weeks usually. I always ask for an estimate . . .and of course it depends on how busy they are . . .some times, during the busiest times of year, the amount of time can be more. I always figure, if I need it for a specific date, I need to plan accordingly :)
    This is true, but I know some long-armers that do custom quilting and it can be as much 6 months. It just depends. If you choose a long armer that does simple panto work, E2E, and all over quilting with computers like the LQS here you can get them back really quickly.

  5. #5
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    how much do they ususally charge. I have a quilt to go to a long arm quilter but have no idea what is the going rate to charge

  6. #6
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    It can vary by the area where you live and the type of quilting you want. I would call several quiters in your area. Ask what their turnaround time is, what their cost is, and whether you supply your own batting, etc... It can be fairly inexpesive for E2E, allover panto, etc... It can be quite expensive if you want custom quilting.

  7. #7
    Senior Member nellebelles's Avatar
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    One time when I took my quilt to a LA to get it quilted, I was told it would take 5 weeks to get it back. I was very patient, and at the end of the 5 weeks, I went in to ask how much longer it would be. I was really upset when she took her stack of orders to see where my quilt was in the line-up--and my quilt order was on the very bottom of the stack! She told me it would be another 2 to 3 weeks longer. Needless to say, I didn't go back to that person again. In her defense, the quilting was beautiful and exactly what I wanted, but moving my order to the bottom of the list was not right... :evil:
    My sister sends the quilts we do together to a LA in another state, and the LA will ask if it is for a special occasion. She will do everything she can to get the quilt back to us in time to do the binding. It usually takes her a couple of weeks to get the quilt back to us, but if we tell her there is no time crunch, then she will get it back to us in about a month or so.

  8. #8
    Super Member colleen53's Avatar
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    thank you everyone for all your information..

  9. #9
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    Back log ( the amount of time it will take to do the projects scheduled ahead of your) time is differerent for each LongArm person.
    I always ask before I send or drop off what the back log is. I ask when they want the quilt top . Once they get it typically no more than 3 weeks.
    They should not be accepting your top if there is a long back log. Yes put you on the project list .. but no need to have the top "in house" till they are close to working on it. Most will call or e- mail that is time for you to get the top to them.
    IF it is a highly custom piece I will send a photo so they can start to get ideas of how to best quilt the top.
    I have had a "space" reserved for October with one Long Arm pro , since March.

  10. #10
    Super Member thequilteddove's Avatar
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    Depends on how busy your LA'r is. My average turn around is now 4-6wks.

  11. #11
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    I agree, it depends on busy the longarmer is. For awhile I was out 4-5 months, at present it is 6-8 weeks.
    I do the quilts as they come in and always ask if they need by a certain date. All longarmers are quite busy I hear, so be patient they will get it done.

    .
    Quote Originally Posted by thequilteddove
    Depends on how busy your LA'r is. My average turn around is now 4-6wks.

  12. #12
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    One of the longarmers I know has a waiting list a year long. She won't take your quilt though until about a week before it's your turn. You call her and get your name on the list and then when it's close to your turn she'll call you and you go drop off your quilt. After she has your quilt the wait time is only about two weeks at the most. I have a couple of friends that just make appointments for twice a year just so they have a slot available.

  13. #13
    Super Member StitchinJoy's Avatar
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    It definitely depends on the longarmer and also on the time of year. I find that I am crazy busy in April, May and June, and from September until Christmas. During these busy times I am booked solid for months.

    Quilters are a generous bunch, always making their beautiful quilts and then giving them away as gifts. My clients keep me hopping, quilting bride and graduation quilts in the second quarter, and holiday quilts in the fourth quarter! I've already started getting in quilt orders for Christmas gifts. Usually my queue is filled by September.

    I see no excuse for a work order to be on the bottom of any pile. That's an organizational issue.

    I have been quilting for 40 years and I'm well aware of the time, energy, effort, and decisions that go into making each quilt. I consider taking in these quilts to be like taking care of someone's child. It's a huge responsibility and shouldn't be treated lightly.

    When a client brings me her quilt, I add the quilt to my project plan as soon as I take it in. I can look and see what I have here, on paper, in one glance. I always have a current printed copy of that project plan on view in my workroom.

    I also print out 2 work orders for each quilt with all the details. One goes home with the client so she knows what we agreed to (thread, design, price, due date, all my conatct information). The other work order gets pinned to her quilt top. That's what I use to tell me what to quilt on it and what thread to use!

    The top and backing get folded neatly over an extra-wide padded drapery hanger and put in my workroom closet in the order it will be done. I can look in that closet and see what I have here, in reality, in one glance.

    Not rocket science. But it works for me.

  14. #14
    Super Member seamstome's Avatar
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    I set up an appointment time with my LA when I want it done ASAP. I email her when I start a project and tell her the week I think I will have it done. For example, the one I am working on now, I told her will be ready after Labor Day. It is slotted in her schedule for Wednesday September 15. Then I get it back in 1-2 weeks, depending on the size of the project. I have never missed a deadline and neither has she. It has been close though.

    The other way I do it is that I drop something off that I dont care when she finishes it. She may have it months and just works it into her slower times. No deadline.

  15. #15

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    My long armer can usually finish something in a few weeks if you're on a tight deadline, but it can take months if she's really busy. I love her work, so I try to accomodate her, too. If I'm not in a rush to get something back, I tell her so, and only give her a deadline if I'm on a deadline for a gift or special occaision.


    Mattee

  16. #16
    Senior Member newestnana's Avatar
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    I just got one back after a 7 month wait. Ugh. In the meantime, my tastes changed somewhat and if I could start over I would have requested a different design.

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